Free-Range Knitter: The Yarn Harlot Writes Again Kindle


10 thoughts on “Free-Range Knitter: The Yarn Harlot Writes Again

  1. SaraJane SaraJane says:

    Page 8 It is my considered belief that the number one reason knitters knit is because they are so smart that they need knitting to make boring things interesting Knitters are so compellingly clever that they simply can t tolerate boredom It takesto engage and entertain this kind of human, and they need an outlet or they get into trouble Knitting probably prevents arson, prison, theft, and certainly mischief I think knitters just can t watch TV without doing something else Page 22 I Page 8 It is my considered belief that the number one reason knitters knit is because they are so smart that they need knitting to make boring things interesting Knitters are so compellingly clever that they simply can t tolerate boredom It takesto engage and entertain this kind of human, and they need an outlet or they get into trouble Knitting probably prevents arson, prison, theft, and certainly mischief I think knitters just can t watch TV without doing something else Page 22 I love beginnings, when all is possible and everything could be fantastic and nothing has stepped up to the plate to disappoint me Page 46 Knitting is what I do to reassure myself that I m not an absolutely inadequate moron, and I don t have a lot of coping skills for abject knitting failure Page 77 Parenting is really odd racket It encourages a human being to become flexible, quick thinking, strong, and resilient, even under the worse or most challenging circumstances We will pause now and silently reflect that this is also the goal of the Navy SEALs Each moment could bring utter delight, a test of your patience, or an engulfing house fire Page 83 At four you were a good reader and a decent knitter and frequently defeated adults with your keen intellect By the time you were five, my little prodigy, my life with you was sort of like a game of Survivor since there was almost nobody alive, adult or child, who could outwit, outlast, or outplay you Your teen years turned into me following you around trying to tell you all the things I had learned the hard way, desperately trying to save you an kind of pain at all, with you starting at me like I was an idiot who didn t know anything and proceeding to learn everything the hard, painful way anyway I don t know about you but I think those years sucked I have spent the last eighteen years being awestruck by the wonder that is you, someone I made in my spare time, and trying desperately to deal best with your epic personality and qualities Tenacity Intelligence Constructive discontent Persistence Sensitivity A fantastic sense of humor Independence Mercy Faithfulness Kindness Equity Kids who fight back and challenge you, say no, and think for themselves are hard to raise and not thought well of at all We all talk about how good an obedient child is, and it struck me at some point while I was raising you that I really couldn t have a child who did as she was told all the time and then expect you to suddenly turn into an adult who was assertive, independent, and free thinking I realized you couldn t tell a kid, Do what I tell you, praise her for obedience, and then turn right around when she becomes a grownup and suddenly say, Think for yourself and condemn adults who are still compliant You re an adult A beautiful legal adult who at least on paper doesn t need her mother You can vote You can move across the country You can start a business or join the Peace Corps or mercy, my child, you can do whatever wonderful thing you want, and you can do it all without my permission I am scared to death Motherhood is the only occupation I can think of where your eventual goal is to put yourself out of business and make it so your customers don t need you any, and I have swung back and forth these last few years, hoping one moment that you will leave and wishing the next moment that you will never leave and I will be allowed to try to keep you safe and with me forever While I am not sure that I am entirely okay with this growing up thing, I know now that I have to at least start letting you go a little bit I need to worry less about you and send youout there, and I will Not all at once, though The world is freakin huge Please try to be patient with me it s so hard for me to let go of my job Try to remember that up until now if something happened to you, it was my fault, and they could put me in prison for it, and in my defense, you are my eldest and the kid I had to practice all of this on These are terrific qualities in an adult Boldly go, my dear heart, boldly go Page 102 You would think male knitting was Brad Pitt in a thong for how much attention it gets Page 118 Human beings are inherently contradictory because our big brains and intellectual selves are in constant conflict with our hearts and emotional selves Page 127 Stereotypes are usually born of a common belief, and common beliefs come about because a majority or at least a bunch of the people that you re forming an idea about fit within your concept Page 135 My inner self is, like most inner selves, a very harsh person who I am not always convinced is on my side I have no idea why I can find something likable about almost everyone I meet, how I can usually find a way to come to them with compassion and understanding when they fail me, but I have the voice inside me be so critical when turned inward


  2. karenbee karenbee says:

    I give up I dutifully read through page 150 of Free Range Knitter and just did not want to pick it up again It s an ARC so I felt I should slog through to the end but I can t make myself do it.Pearl McPhee s writing is fine words are put together nicely, and it s funny in spots, touching in others, but there s no SNAP, no connection I am uninterested in this essay collection and reading it was like homework.The essays with surprise endings are predictable, the description of knitting sty I give up I dutifully read through page 150 of Free Range Knitter and just did not want to pick it up again It s an ARC so I felt I should slog through to the end but I can t make myself do it.Pearl McPhee s writing is fine words are put together nicely, and it s funny in spots, touching in others, but there s no SNAP, no connection I am uninterested in this essay collection and reading it was like homework.The essays with surprise endings are predictable, the description of knitting styles is pretty at first but starts to get snoozy after a while, and the book overall seems to lack a spark.There are a couple of essays I DID like, but I think the best way to explain it is reading Free Range Knitter is like reading a blog It s written well enough that I d add it to my feed at first, but it s one I d mark as read if I missedthan a couple of days, and after a couple of months, I d unsubscribe.It s entirely possible people who dothan dabble in knitting might enjoy this one , and it goes without saying that Yarn Harlot fans definitely would


  3. Maria Elmvang Maria Elmvang says:

    I loved this essay collection It s the first book I ve read by the Yarn Harlot although I ve read some of her blog , but it definitely won t be the last I ve only knitted for real for two years, but already I could see far too much of myself in it, and she gave me a lot of new ideas for how to knit on the go.It s a cozy read whose only fault was that it kept making me want to put down my Kindle and pick up my knitting instead.Reread 2020 Unfortunately I had to downgrade the rating a bit I loved this essay collection It s the first book I ve read by the Yarn Harlot although I ve read some of her blog , but it definitely won t be the last I ve only knitted for real for two years, but already I could see far too much of myself in it, and she gave me a lot of new ideas for how to knit on the go.It s a cozy read whose only fault was that it kept making me want to put down my Kindle and pick up my knitting instead.Reread 2020 Unfortunately I had to downgrade the rating a bit I LOVED the first essay collection, but like her later ones, many of the essays in this one were only tangentially related to knitting and I just don t care as much about those I still loved the ones that were focused on the knitting, but ended up mostly skimming the others


  4. Lynn Lynn says:

    This is another of those 99 cent deals I got on a whim I used to knit quite a bit, but then I started a business and every spare second of my life was pretty much wiped out entirely And the only reason I read books now is as an act of rebellion and escape, somehow I can feelnoble about reading and can launch a better defense about why I m not working armed with a book, instead of a ball of sock yarn I have sorta of known about this writer knitter for awhile now Her first book came out This is another of those 99 cent deals I got on a whim I used to knit quite a bit, but then I started a business and every spare second of my life was pretty much wiped out entirely And the only reason I read books now is as an act of rebellion and escape, somehow I can feelnoble about reading and can launch a better defense about why I m not working armed with a book, instead of a ball of sock yarn I have sorta of known about this writer knitter for awhile now Her first book came out when I was the midst of my yarn frenzy, and I even thought about picking it up, but the idea of short stories about knitting, seemed, even then, a bit tedious But 99 cents is 99 cents, so I purchased it, eager to fill up my e reader.Overall, this feels like a lackluster effort I have not read the first volume, so I can t really compare, but I get the impression that perhaps the first was better, and the publisher ordered a second book, so Pearl McPhee had to take the remnants from the cutting room floor and make a second book It just comes off half hearted I especially dislike when authors are self reverential to the point that they have to talk about writing the very book in which you are reading If you find yourself with the task of a book deadline and you write a chapter about how you have no time or quiet to write your book, well, you re doing it wrong We don t want to hear about it, especially when you haven t impressed us so far.There were a few charming stories, but mostly it was full of very predictable stories, including several that are supposed to have surprise endings, but are so conventional and thinly disguised that you get the premise from the second sentence and spend the rest of the time just waiting for the author to get to the point Not helping this is the author s writing style Her sentences are at times painfully long, and then she will repeat the same sentiment a few sentences later, as if she liked both phrases and couldn t decide which to use, so we have to suffer through both How long are her sentences There were several times, reading this on my iPhone with the text set to small where an entire sentence would span the entire face of the devicesomething that I rarely notice happening And rather than injecting some shorter sentences in there to give the pieces some rhythm, they just seem to get longer and longer If it seems weird for me to remark about the length of the sentences, maybe that gives you an idea of how bored I got reading it I wish I could just pull myself away from books like this, which I suspect are not going to redeem themselves, but I just feel like every book should be finished It s a disease


  5. Hannah Hannah says:

    I enjoyed it Random thoughts Are there really people who walk and knit If so, my weirdness with knitting has not quite hit that point yet I didn t know there were special bags for carrying around your yarn so it doesn t roll around on the bus I promptly went out and bought this Sock Knitting Project Bag Hexipuff Small Crochet Wip Bag Crazy Calaveras so that I can carry around my socks in progress SiP The story of the ball of the yarn in the elevator seriously cracked me up T I enjoyed it Random thoughts Are there really people who walk and knit If so, my weirdness with knitting has not quite hit that point yet I didn t know there were special bags for carrying around your yarn so it doesn t roll around on the bus I promptly went out and bought this Sock Knitting Project Bag Hexipuff Small Crochet Wip Bag Crazy Calaveras so that I can carry around my socks in progress SiP The story of the ball of the yarn in the elevator seriously cracked me up The story of the little girl learning to knit was awesome I no longer feel quite as guilty at the thought of having multiple needles of the same size so I can havesocks going at once There is nothing wrong with my addiction and it s very nice to have it confirmed It was a light hearted, funny book that poked fun at all of the things we do as knitters or things that we think about doing but don t actually do I also really liked Stephanie Pearl McPhee Casts Off The Yarn Harlot s Guide to the Land of Knitting I listened to that one on audio book After all, what s better than reading fun knitting annocdotes than knitting and listening to an audio book about knitting


  6. Margot Margot says:

    Free range knitter contains a collection of personal essays and humorous bits pertaining to her life long obsession with knitting Being one of her later works, this book contains a lot of essays about the latter stages of parental life once most of her kids have reached their teenage years.This is the second book I ve read by Stephanie Pearl McPhee, and I actually found this one a bit disappointing I particularly found most of the essays about parenting and watching other people knit rather d Free range knitter contains a collection of personal essays and humorous bits pertaining to her life long obsession with knitting Being one of her later works, this book contains a lot of essays about the latter stages of parental life once most of her kids have reached their teenage years.This is the second book I ve read by Stephanie Pearl McPhee, and I actually found this one a bit disappointing I particularly found most of the essays about parenting and watching other people knit rather dull and was impatient to get to the next story Yet she hides little gems even in theseboring stories, so I don t feel like I can skip ahead without potentially missing out on something Note to people with kids you probably won t find the parenting essays so dull It s just that I don t have children, let alone teenagers, so it really isn t the kind of thing I can sympathize with yet Free range knitter, as with Pearl McPhee s other works, offered a few very redeeming stories in it as well I particularly enjoyed the essay about how she knits while she walks, and the unfortunate elevator incident that results, and her story on how she taught her daughters to knit through osmosis


  7. Kaitlyn Kaitlyn says:

    Purchased because it was for sale for about 3 for Kindle the other day Definitely worth the impulse buy Cute, light, sweet, funny Her books read much the same way as her blog and that s a good thing I don t think that this was a strong as others of hers that I have read perhaps just Yarn Harlot The Secret Life of a Knitter but I enjoyed particularly the story of her friend struggling with depression Or maybe enjoyed is not the word I thought that and the story of her Aunt Helen wer Purchased because it was for sale for about 3 for Kindle the other day Definitely worth the impulse buy Cute, light, sweet, funny Her books read much the same way as her blog and that s a good thing I don t think that this was a strong as others of hers that I have read perhaps just Yarn Harlot The Secret Life of a Knitter but I enjoyed particularly the story of her friend struggling with depression Or maybe enjoyed is not the word I thought that and the story of her Aunt Helen were particularly poignant Further, there were times when, knitting aside, I felt that she truly understood me which is pretty much any story that ended in embarrassment I can relate And I love the tale of heading up to the cabin to write I believe I remember reading that on her blog years ago so that was especially fun.This is a book for and about knitters I doubt it would be interesting to anyone who didn t at least know love a knitter but it was nice and warm and fuzzy for those who can relate


  8. Donna Donna says:

    If you ve read any of Pearl Mcphee s other books, this one is most similar to Yarn Harlot The Secret Life of a Knitter That s still my favorite of her books.Some of the chapters in Free Range Knitter are full of her great blend of humor and insight Sadly, it feels like she missed the mark in others, and there were a few that felt like pure filler.I didn t really care for the chapters where she talked about her friends and their knitting, because they mostly seemed like personal stories and re If you ve read any of Pearl Mcphee s other books, this one is most similar to Yarn Harlot The Secret Life of a Knitter That s still my favorite of her books.Some of the chapters in Free Range Knitter are full of her great blend of humor and insight Sadly, it feels like she missed the mark in others, and there were a few that felt like pure filler.I didn t really care for the chapters where she talked about her friends and their knitting, because they mostly seemed like personal stories and reflections that I couldn t connect with But there was one big exception One of the standout parts of the book was the chapter about gender roles and the way that people react to her male friend when they see him knitting in public That chapter took one of those friend stories and turned it into a larger,thought provoking point about both knitting and society


  9. MJ MJ says:

    I ve read a few books both fiction and nonfiction on the topic of sentimental knitting musings and found that most of them didn t resonate with me at all A lot of knitting memoirs are simply written by people I don t have a lot in common with, and it s hard to find common ground with various middle aged white mothers who inherited knitting through some family legacy of grandmothers and whose yarn budgets and tastes differ vastly from my own But while Pearl McPhee fits the exact description I ve read a few books both fiction and nonfiction on the topic of sentimental knitting musings and found that most of them didn t resonate with me at all A lot of knitting memoirs are simply written by people I don t have a lot in common with, and it s hard to find common ground with various middle aged white mothers who inherited knitting through some family legacy of grandmothers and whose yarn budgets and tastes differ vastly from my own But while Pearl McPhee fits the exact description above, within the first few pages of the book I had an overwhelming urge to be her friend Somehow, with her mix of sarcasm, blunt charm, and fierce passion, I believed fully that at last, here is a knitter who Gets It Pearl McPhee understands knitting and she understands knitters, and she takes so much joy in writing about it that reading this book feelslike having a conversation with a good friend at the end of a long day Of course I cried at the end, but that just seems to be a thing I do with a lot of books these days


  10. Chris Chris says:

    I received this as an Early Reviewers copy Free Range Knitter is a collection of essays, split into seven parts as if it were a knitting project casting on, knitting two together, yarn overs, left leaning decreases, making one, continuing to knit even, and casting off Each part begins with an essay about how a friend or family member knits, which then leads to deeper insights Pearl McPhee s trademark knitting humour is evident throughout the book, and some of the essays will be familiar to I received this as an Early Reviewers copy Free Range Knitter is a collection of essays, split into seven parts as if it were a knitting project casting on, knitting two together, yarn overs, left leaning decreases, making one, continuing to knit even, and casting off Each part begins with an essay about how a friend or family member knits, which then leads to deeper insights Pearl McPhee s trademark knitting humour is evident throughout the book, and some of the essays will be familiar to regular readers of Pearl McPhee s blog, Yarn Harlot, but rest assured that the book includes plenty of extremely readable and thought provoking new material I found myself repeatedly setting this book aside, taking short breaks so I could savor it and look forward to the next part I also kept trying to figure out what blend of essayists I could use to describe the feel of the book I think Elizabeth Zimmermann meets Aldo Leopold, with a dash of Bill Bryson is probably the best I can do


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Free-Range Knitter: The Yarn Harlot Writes Again [PDF / Epub] ☆ Free-Range Knitter: The Yarn Harlot Writes Again By Stephanie Pearl-McPhee – Thomashillier.co.uk a sort of David Sedaris like take on knitting laugh out loud funny most of the time and poignantly reflective when it s not cracking you up Library Journal on Yarn HarlotStephanie Pearl McPhee returns a sort of David The Yarn eBook ✓ Sedaris like take on knitting laugh out loud funny most of the time and poignantly reflective when it s not cracking you up Library Journal on Yarn HarlotStephanie Pearl McPhee returns to pen another hilarious and poignant collection of essays surrounding her favorite topics knitting, knitters, and what happens when you get those Free-Range Knitter: Epub / two things anywhere near ordinary peopleFor themillion knitters in America, Stephanie Pearl McPhee aka the Yarn Harlot shares stories of knitting horrors and triumphs, knitting successes and defeats, but, mostly, stories about the human condition that ring true for everyone especially if you happen to have a rather large amount of yarn in your housePearl McPhee maintains a Knitter: The Yarn Kindle Ö popular blog at yarnharlot Divided into sections relating to each essay s content, such as women, politics, family, and overcoming boredom, Free Range Knitter will entertain yarnsmiths who enjoy sharing in the collective experiences of the woolen and silky skein.

  • Hardcover
  • 228 pages
  • Free-Range Knitter: The Yarn Harlot Writes Again
  • Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
  • English
  • 06 March 2019
  • 0740769472

About the Author: Stephanie Pearl-McPhee

Stephanie Pearl McPhee better The Yarn eBook ✓ known as the Yarn Harlot is a prolific knitter, writer and blogger known for her humorous but always insightful anecdotes and stories about knitting triumphs and tragedies.