Paperback Ø The Love-Artist eBook ↠

The Love-Artist [Epub] ➣ The Love-Artist ➤ Jane Alison – Thomashillier.co.uk Why was Ovid, the most popular poet of his day, banished from Rome Why do only two lines survive of his play Medea, reputedly his most passionate, most accomplished work Between the known details of O Why was Ovid, the most popular poet of his day, banished from Rome Why do only two lines survive of his play Medea, reputedly his most passionate, most accomplished work Between the known details of Ovid s life and these enigmas, Jane Alison has created a haunting drama of psychological manipulation, and an ingenious meditation on love, art and immortality When Ovid e.


About the Author: Jane Alison

Jane Alison was born in Canberra, Australia, and grew up in the Australian and US foreign services She attended public schools in Washington, DC and earned a BA in classics from Princeton University Before writing fiction, she worked as an administrator for the National Endowment for the Humanities, as a production artist for the Washington City Paper, as an editor for the Miami New Times, and as a proposal and speechwriter for Tulane University She also worked as a freelance editor and illustrator before attending Columbia University to study creative writing Her first novel, The Love Artist, was published in by Farrar, Straus Giroux and has been translated into seven languages It was followed by The Marriage of the Sea, a New York Times Notable Book of Her novel, Natives and Exotics, appeared in and was one of that summer s recommended readings by Alan Cheuse of National Public Radio Her short fiction and critical writing have recently appeared in Seed Five Points Postscript Essays on Film and the Humanities and The Germanic Review She has also written several biographies for children and co edited with Harold Bloom a critical series on women writers She has taught writing and literature at Columbia, Barnard, Bryn Mawr, and for writers groups in Geneva, Switzerland Jane Alison s most recent book, Nine Island, is an autobiographical novel forthcoming from Catapult in Sept She is currently Professor and Director of Creative Writing at the University of Virginia, and lives in Charlottesville, VA.



10 thoughts on “The Love-Artist

  1. Scribble Orca Scribble Orca says:

    Why was Ovid, the most popular writer of his era, banished to the remote town of Tomis in the Black Sea from the seat of the Empire s power, Rome, and the side of his patron, Augustus Why are merely two lines of Medea, widely touted as his most ardent and accomplished work, the only surviving remnant of this play Between the historical facts of Ovid s life, his admission that a poem and a mistake were the pillars of his ruin, and these tantalising enigmas, Jane Alison has wrought a hauntingly r Why was Ovid, the most popular writer of his era, banished to the remote town of Tomis in the Black Sea from the seat of the Empire s power, Rome, and the side of his patron, Augustus Why are merely two lines of Medea, widely touted as his most ardent and accomplished work, the only surviving remnant of this play Between the historical facts of Ovid s life, his admission that a poem and a mistake were the pillars of his ruin, and these tantalising enigmas, Jane Alison has wrought a hauntingly romantic drama of psychological manipulation and sensual intrigue.Holidaying in the Black Sea on the outskirts of the Roman Empire and avoiding the potential displeasure of Augustus, Ovid chances upon an almost unearthly woman who epitomises the fantastical elements of his about to be published Metamorphoses A delectable, desirable, alluring combination of mystic and witch, Xenia seems myth translated into life Ovid is enchanted, obsessed, almost as a virgin youth experiencing his first love, he is brimming with inspiration Xenia will be the muse for his pi ce de r sistance But this time, he renders his subject seductively dark and twisted.When autumn arrives, Ovid tempts Xenia from her home on the coast of the Black Sea to Rome with the promise of immortality only an artist can bequeath The ineluctable noose of ambition lures Ovid and he enters a Faustian contract, deceiving his muse and hurling them both towards a retribution he never imagined As Ovid and Xenia become entangled in his art inspiring life conspiracy and the schemes of his patrons, so the reader is ensnared in this chilling yet enthralling re telling of the events leading to Ovid s banishment.The Love Artist is an exotic, brilliant and utterly compelling meditation on love, genius, and the artist s and his or her muse unswerving quest for immortality Ms Alison s prose is as bewitching as Xenia is described, as sensual and steamy as Ovid s The Art of Love, and as flawlessly complex and evocative of Ancient Rome as any cinematic poem scribed by the classical poets.Ms Alison foreshadows the events that will eventually engulf Ovid by opening her story with the journey of his exile to Tomis, but the story proper commences in the light and heat and smells of summer and the joy of the first stirrings of unexpected, overwhelming, infatuation As the seasons fade into winter, so the menace of Ovid s plotting and the machinations of shadowy puppeteers shroud the protagonists until each is propelled along a path that can only result in a terrifying, profoundly disturbing conclusion.Readers of lusciously written character driven prose, who enjoy fictional history of the ancient world, with breath taking twists of plot and consequence, will not be disappointed with The Love Artist


  2. Savvy Savvy says:

    Poetic JusticeThis intriguing, tightly woven tale grabbed me from the la prima pagina with its lush evocative prose and mercurial movement.Ovid was exiled from Rome we know from history, but scholars continue to ponder and argue the reasons for and nature of this bitterly harsh banishment The play that was to be his masterpiece Medea remains forever only a few lines of enigmatic prose Springing from this enigma, the story of the magical Xenia Xenia, a foreigner, a baby left adrift, onl Poetic JusticeThis intriguing, tightly woven tale grabbed me from the la prima pagina with its lush evocative prose and mercurial movement.Ovid was exiled from Rome we know from history, but scholars continue to ponder and argue the reasons for and nature of this bitterly harsh banishment The play that was to be his masterpiece Medea remains forever only a few lines of enigmatic prose Springing from this enigma, the story of the magical Xenia Xenia, a foreigner, a baby left adrift, only to blossom into a very powerful enchanting female force, ablaze, untamable and capable of magical forces Exotic and erotic, she yearns to acquire the quinta essentia, the substance of life Possessing an ineffable feminine jouissance, Xenia s character is strongly sensual, yet softly childlike.The back story that Ms Allison weaves is a deeply wrought, yet finely tuned instrument icy hot mythically mad and passionately portrayed Within this duality of human nature, sex and power converge to excite and entice the reader to travel with Xenia and Ovid over the wild animals housed beneath the stones of Rome while feeling the electricity flowing between their very souls.I walked the stone streets and felt the marble statues inhaled the fragrant herbs and felt the warmth of Roman baths wash over me the prose was so radiantly rendered My heart knew the twist that would close this journey, but it takes careful attention to the movement in this cleverly crafted novel to fully realize what Ms Allison ultimately offers up I hope to readfrom this enchanting author I d especially love to follow Xenia deeper into the Black Sea over the pebbles and back into that water where she came crashing up through the bubbles into the fresh air Exhilarating Highly recommended


  3. Sharon Sharon says:

    Had this book not been assigned to me for a course, I most likely would not have picked it up And that, my friends, would be a sorrow and a pity I would have missed out on something brilliant.Author Jane Alison has created one of the most lyrical novels I ve ever read Her book imagines Ovid as he writes his Medea only two lines of which survive , inspired by two women in his life Xenia and Julia.One of the things I found most interesting about this book is how little dialogue was used Al Had this book not been assigned to me for a course, I most likely would not have picked it up And that, my friends, would be a sorrow and a pity I would have missed out on something brilliant.Author Jane Alison has created one of the most lyrical novels I ve ever read Her book imagines Ovid as he writes his Medea only two lines of which survive , inspired by two women in his life Xenia and Julia.One of the things I found most interesting about this book is how little dialogue was used Alison shows us what the three main characters are thinking and feeling, while creating an impression that they seldom speak about those feelings or the decisions that result from them From the moment Ovid meets Xenia in the Caucasus to the time that they part company, we have a picture of Ovid s Rome and Xenia s disturbing visions of its future , with all of the politics and violence that were at play during his time We also see three people steeped in their own needs and not caring that they use others around them as pawns.The prose in this book is nothing short of gorgeous Fans of literary and historical fiction will both find much to like here


  4. Jane Polese Jane Polese says:

    I read this book for the Coursera course Plagues, Witches, and War, The Worlds of Historical Fiction I generally enjoy historical fiction and consider myself a historian Perhaps I would have enjoyed this bookif I knewabout Ovid, his writing and Imperial Rome It was fineincluded some magical realism However, I admit I was lost for a good amount of the story.


  5. Jane Jane says:

    Ovid, the Roman poet, was exiled to Tomis on the Black Sea for what he says in his Tristia Carmen et error A poem and a mistakethis ambiguity, scholars and historians through the years have tried to puzzle out why he was exiled Alison presents us with her speculation, giving us a lush, sensuous tale of Ovid and a mysterious witch , Xenia, he meets at the Black Sea area asalubrious part than his final home They fall in love and he ta Ovid, the Roman poet, was exiled to Tomis on the Black Sea for what he says in his Tristia Carmen et error A poem and a mistakethis ambiguity, scholars and historians through the years have tried to puzzle out why he was exiled Alison presents us with her speculation, giving us a lush, sensuous tale of Ovid and a mysterious witch , Xenia, he meets at the Black Sea area asalubrious part than his final home They fall in love and he takes her to Rome returning to Rome in the midst of his exile sounded incredible He begins writing a tragedy of Medea with her as muse and model for the priestess Xenia feels he has betrayed her with another woman Jealous of his patroness, Julia, of the imperial family, she exacts a horrible vengeance on him I could SEE all scenes before me vividly, despite the author s sometimes purple prose Besides the jealousy and betrayal, a main theme is the permanence of art and the artist in this case Ovid Will he always be remembered through the years As Xenia has the gift of seeing into the future he keeps asking Xenia This is an obsession with him The novel took awhile to pick up steam, but finally rolled on swiftly to its inexorable conclusion With not much dialogue, this contemplative novel expresses the inner life of its characters and may be too slow moving for some readers.Recommended On rereading in November 2016, I lowered my rating to a 3 This time around I felt it compared unfavorably with the other speculations on Ovid in exile I have read by not adheringclosely to what might have been from what we know and this iteration being too unbelievable.There was no mention of his writings from that time The Tristia of Ovid orTristium Libri V Et Epistolae Ex Ponto Libri IV,


  6. Wendelah1 Wendelah1 says:

    I read this book for a class on historical fiction Why it was chosen is beyond me There is almost no dialogue, the characters are underdeveloped at best, one dimensional stereotypes at worst The poet Ovid is presented as a creative fraud, which I m presuming was because it was an easier choice than trying to imagine what it s like to think like a poet when you lack imagination yourself The lack of dialogue Maybe she doesn t know how to write it I can t believe this is being used in class a I read this book for a class on historical fiction Why it was chosen is beyond me There is almost no dialogue, the characters are underdeveloped at best, one dimensional stereotypes at worst The poet Ovid is presented as a creative fraud, which I m presuming was because it was an easier choice than trying to imagine what it s like to think like a poet when you lack imagination yourself The lack of dialogue Maybe she doesn t know how to write it I can t believe this is being used in class as an example of a good historical novel


  7. Kim Kim says:

    Let me start off with two confessions 1 Yeah, I bought this book in part because of the cover art it s gorgeous Wish I looked like that and 2 I m kind of scared to read historical fiction, particularly ancient history That s because I m this close to getting my PhD in ancient history, and most of the time when I read historical novels, I spend so much time looking for errors that I can t enjoy the story However, with The Love Artist I was able to avoid this problem, partly because the a Let me start off with two confessions 1 Yeah, I bought this book in part because of the cover art it s gorgeous Wish I looked like that and 2 I m kind of scared to read historical fiction, particularly ancient history That s because I m this close to getting my PhD in ancient history, and most of the time when I read historical novels, I spend so much time looking for errors that I can t enjoy the story However, with The Love Artist I was able to avoid this problem, partly because the author is a classicist and partly because the story she tells fills in the gaps in known history rather than retelling a story for which there is already plenty of evidence The Roman poet Ovid, one of the most popular of his day, was exiled by the emperor Augustus for, he says a poem and an error We don t know what the error was, although there are plenty of theories, many involving the emperor s granddaughter Julia, who was exiled around the same time In The Love Artist, Alison provides a possible explanation, writing of Ovid s obsession with the witch Xenia whom he meets on holiday in Tomis on the Black Sea Ovid, Xenia, and Julia all come alive as believable characters, if not always likable ones, and Alison s prose style is elegant and sparse I was impressed that her writing was not overly expository or salacious, a problem I ve had with historical novels in the past The ending did feel a little rushed to me, and I d be interested in hearing how this novel was received by someone who had closely studied the mystery of Ovid s exile and, contrarily, someone with little to no knowledge of ancient Roman history I enjoyed it, and was caught up in Alison s fictional world


  8. Rachel Rachel says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Probably a 2.5 star rating, really I gotta say, I started Metamorphoses by Ovid over the summer and put it down, but if I ever manage to pick it back up again, I am definitely going to see him in a different light She did manage to find those buttons and push The writing was beautiful, but I also got a whiff of trying too hard, which is always pretty fatal It slowed down the narrative and seemed to be trying to mask some of the deficiencies of the rest of the novel One of my main issues wit Probably a 2.5 star rating, really I gotta say, I started Metamorphoses by Ovid over the summer and put it down, but if I ever manage to pick it back up again, I am definitely going to see him in a different light She did manage to find those buttons and push The writing was beautiful, but I also got a whiff of trying too hard, which is always pretty fatal It slowed down the narrative and seemed to be trying to mask some of the deficiencies of the rest of the novel One of my main issues with the novel was the repetitious nature of it, how many times am I going to hear about her gazing at him, him gazing at her I thought maybe he should see somebody about those sweaty wrists of his The jump from loving couple to jealous and suspicious lovers was a little too steep for me as well Really, their first time in public he goes off with another woman His logic seemed completely screwed up, i.e not believable, for such a smart guy, and his end goal was kind of ridiculous Julia seemed an add on as well Barely mentioned at first and then plays a pivotal role Eh, didn t believe it, and didn t really believe her story, as her backstory was not enough to show her motivations It would definitely be a cool project to go through and find all the myths that she interspersed throughout and analyze the myth that it becomes, out of the truth of the story


  9. Kelley Kelley says:

    This book was not horrible I give 2 stars to books I think are okay Maybe it deserves 3 stars A lot of people would probably love it I just don t enjoy this kind of book I need an interesting, well executed plot Sorry, I just do Unless you re Cormac McCarthy or other master of prose, you know what I mean Then you can get away with it The author does have some beautiful moments here and there Unfortunately, the writing is overwrought, and mostly, painful to read each sentence torture This book was not horrible I give 2 stars to books I think are okay Maybe it deserves 3 stars A lot of people would probably love it I just don t enjoy this kind of book I need an interesting, well executed plot Sorry, I just do Unless you re Cormac McCarthy or other master of prose, you know what I mean Then you can get away with it The author does have some beautiful moments here and there Unfortunately, the writing is overwrought, and mostly, painful to read each sentence tortured out, barely The pacing is excruciating and the dialogue nearly non existent Some lovely, lyrical moments there though


  10. Carole B Carole B says:

    This book reminds me of some of the books I read for the fiction writing class in Greece, perhaps because it is set in ancient circumstances, but maybe because it blendsof the fantastic into the fabric of the historical setting Giving Xenia the ability to see into the future gives the story acomprehensive chronological sense, which is interesting as a reader aware of the variety of distances between here and Rome The decision to spend so much time in Ovid and Xenia s consciousness This book reminds me of some of the books I read for the fiction writing class in Greece, perhaps because it is set in ancient circumstances, but maybe because it blendsof the fantastic into the fabric of the historical setting Giving Xenia the ability to see into the future gives the story acomprehensive chronological sense, which is interesting as a reader aware of the variety of distances between here and Rome The decision to spend so much time in Ovid and Xenia s consciousness was a bit exhausting as a reader, and I would have preferredaction and dialogue But as an authorial choice it made sense with the true topic of the story, because though framed as the story of their relationship, this is just the story of their independent characters, fiercely separated despite their intense temporary collision


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *