Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism PDF ·

Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism [PDF] ✅ Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism ✈ Elizabeth A. Povinelli – Thomashillier.co.uk In Geontologies Elizabeth A Povinelli continues her project of mapping the current conditions of late liberalism by offering a bold retheorization of power Finding Foucauldian biopolitics unable to ad In Geontologies Elizabeth A Povinelli Requiem to PDF/EPUB Á continues her project of mapping the current conditions of late liberalism by offering a bold retheorization of power Finding Foucauldian Geontologies: A MOBI :↠ biopolitics unable to adequately reveal contemporary mechanisms of power and governance, Povinelli describes a mode of power she calls geontopower, which operates through the regulation of A Requiem to eBook ☆ the distinction between Life and Nonlife and the figures of the Desert, the Animist, and the Virus Geontologies examines this formation of power from the perspective of Indigenous Australian maneuvers against the settler state And it probes how our contemporary critical languages anthropogenic climate change, plasticity, new materialism, antinormativity often unwittingly transform their struggles against geontopower into a deeper entwinement within it A woman who became a river, a snakelike entity who spawns the fog, plesiosaurus fossils and vast networks of rock weirs in asking how these different forms of existence refuse incorporation into the vocabularies of Western theory Povinelli provides a revelatory new way to understand a form of power long self evident in certain regimes of settler late liberalism but now becoming visible much further beyond.


10 thoughts on “Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism

  1. vi macdonald vi macdonald says:

    This is really incredible work As we enter the later phases of integrated world capitalism, the contemporary discourse becomes increasingly resource obsessed especially in the particularly unsettling resurrection of Malthus and Hobbes in certain spheres Povinelli brilliantly highlights that the ways power manifests at a geologic level has always been integral to the current economic system It isn t some emergent trend unique to the anthropocene, it s just now reaching a wider awareness The This is really incredible work As we enter the later phases of integrated world capitalism, the contemporary discourse becomes increasingly resource obsessed especially in the particularly unsettling resurrection of Malthus and Hobbes in certain spheres Povinelli brilliantly highlights that the ways power manifests at a geologic level has always been integral to the current economic system It isn t some emergent trend unique to the anthropocene, it s just now reaching a wider awareness The fact her research is rooted in Australia also made it all hit particularly close to home for me, with many sections bringing to mind childhood memories of the millennium drought and my parents involvement anti uranium mining groups A really brilliant read, can t recommend it highly enough Update I ve been drawn to re read selections from this over the past couple of weeks I was initially inspired to return to this when reading Kathryn Yusoff s brilliant A Billion Black Anthropocene s or None which explores a lot of similar territory about the politicised distinctions between life and non nife under liberal capitalism , but things came even closer to home when the inherent violence of the settler colonial state reasserted itself It s been one thing after another all year I mean, it always is, but this year has felt particularly impossible to ignore The reinvigoration international Black Lives Matter movement due to recent unspeakable tragedies has been a stark reminder of the weaponisation of the distinction between life and non life by the state


  2. Anna Anna says:

    Having read Geontologies and thought on it for a few days, I remain uncertain of its central thesis Povinelli makes it clear that she is trying to go beyond Foucault s famous idea of biopower to some newer concept of power that apparently ties in with object oriented ontology However I couldn t quite grasp it As I m a dilettante of theory reading, perhaps that is not surprising Still, I found the examples of practise engaging Povinelli is an anthropologist who spent a great deal of time l Having read Geontologies and thought on it for a few days, I remain uncertain of its central thesis Povinelli makes it clear that she is trying to go beyond Foucault s famous idea of biopower to some newer concept of power that apparently ties in with object oriented ontology However I couldn t quite grasp it As I m a dilettante of theory reading, perhaps that is not surprising Still, I found the examples of practise engaging Povinelli is an anthropologist who spent a great deal of time living with indigenous Australian people Her accounts of their interactions with the Australian government and use of technology to record their cultural history are readable and vivid The philosophical sections, on the other hand, made me wonder at times, Isn t this what Andreas Malm warned you about in The Progress of This Storm Nature and Society in a Warming World In that book, he confronts the recent philosophical turn to considering natural resources as actors Povinelli does not claim this as such, rather she questions how different things would be if places important to indigenous Australian culture were viewed in this way, as having some level of personhood While this is undoubtedly an interesting thought experiment, the fact is that in the dominant logic of capitalism they are not Australian law has scant respect for the personhood and rights of indigenous people, it seems, let alone their lands Povinelli consistently acknowledges this, despite it seemingly undermining the purposefulness of much of her philosophical material Not many politicians and capitalists are likely to consider Two Women Sitting Down, tjelbak snakes, or any of the other Nonlife existents that this book discusses capable of smelling humans, of having intentionally based actions, or of actively interpreting their environments I would wager that for most non Indigeneous manganese is not thought capable of uttering groans or cries expressing suffering, hunger, or anger in a factual sense When pushed they would probably admit that they thought Two Women Sitting Down, durlgmo, Old Man Rock, Tjipel, and tjelbak are fictional existences, narrative overlays to underlying real phenomena My hope when reading theory is always that it will better explain the world as it is and how it could be Geontologies does introduces a new perspective via vignettes of indigenous Australian life However it didn t quite coalesce for me into something I could explain to someone else my test of whether I understand The discussion of how life and nonlife can be distinguished, and whether they should be, was thought provoking Less promisingly, the chapters tend to end with questions to which the instinctive answer is either No or a shrug, such as these After all, the question is not whether these meterological and geological forms of existence are playing a part in the current government of the demos Clearly they already do, economically, politically, and socially The question is what role has been assigned to them as they emerge from a low background hum to making a demand on the political order As the drama of climate change accelerates and the concept of the Anthropocene consolidates, will existents such as the tjelbak be absorbed into the policing of Life and Nonlife, markets and difference, Logos and phonos Or will they disrupt the material and discursive orders that prop up these forms of governance The style and content of Geontologies reminded me somewhat of Donna Haraway s Staying with the Trouble Making Kin in the Chthulucene, although I found Povinelli s practical examplesappealing and meaningful While my philosophical understanding does not seem further advanced, I liked the accounts of indigenous Australian culture very much The subtitle A requiem to late liberalism appears unwarranted, as the book is not about late liberalism to any great extent Povinelli does however summarise the carbon economy rather effectively The key to the massive expansion of capital was the discovery of a force of life in dead matter, or life in the remainders of life namely, in coal and petroleum Living fuel human labour was exponentially supplemented and often replaced by dead fuel the carbon remainders of previously alive entities even as the ethical problems of extracting life from life have been mitigated Capitalism is an enormous smelter, shovelling into its furnace the living and the dead


  3. hami hami says:

    The first chapter of the book is a cartography of western philosophies and schools of thought, in relation to Foucault s biopower only to start unpacking the identified problems throughout the rest of the book She is attempting to move from the inadequate term biopower and biopolitics to Gerontology and what she calls Geontopower Unfortunately, I have not been patient enough to finish the book and left it off on page 45 Povinelli Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia Uni The first chapter of the book is a cartography of western philosophies and schools of thought, in relation to Foucault s biopower only to start unpacking the identified problems throughout the rest of the book She is attempting to move from the inadequate term biopower and biopolitics to Gerontology and what she calls Geontopower Unfortunately, I have not been patient enough to finish the book and left it off on page 45 Povinelli Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University is trying to describe the contemporary condition of late liberalism settler late liberalism not of capitalism, because probably that has been done many times through the perspective of indigenous Australian peoples A task that seems to become complicated by her Eurocentric philosophical discourse and language She acknowledges the fact that the construction of our life is built upon the destruction of others However, she fails to produce a practical decolonial methodology She rarely mentions colonialism or decolonialism In chapter 2, the account of her activism on Two Women Sitting Down case against a mining company in Australia could be helpful for those unfamiliar with indigenous peoples right to self determination Overall, maybe this book can be a helpful tool as an introduction for the majority of white academics who are interested in ontology, object oriented ontology, Anthropocene, plant consciousness, new materialism, antinormativity, etc to start thinking about indigenous epistemology, cultural studies or even post colonialism and border imperialism


  4. Bill Brydon Bill Brydon says:

    As the future of human life or a human way of life is put under pressure from the heating of the planet, ontology has reemerged as a central problem in philosophy, anthropology, literary and cultural studies, and in science and technology studies Increasingly not only can critical theorists not demonstrate the superiority of the human to other forms of life thus the rise of posthumanist politics and theory but they also struggle to maintain a difference that makes a difference between all forms As the future of human life or a human way of life is put under pressure from the heating of the planet, ontology has reemerged as a central problem in philosophy, anthropology, literary and cultural studies, and in science and technology studies Increasingly not only can critical theorists not demonstrate the superiority of the human to other forms of life thus the rise of posthumanist politics and theory but they also struggle to maintain a difference that makes a difference between all forms of Life and the category of Nonlife Critical theory has increasingly put pressure on the ontological distinctions among biological, geological, and meteorological existents, and a posthuman critique is giving way to a post life critique, being to assemblage, and biopower to geontopower What status should objects have in various Western ontologies


  5. Riar Riar says:

    Sometimes baffled by its many erratic terminologies, I find the concept of geontopower really intriguing Povinelli traces the relation between late liberalism though I m still not sure what is the difference between late liberalism and neoliberalism and of course the good old fashion capitalism and the Anthropocene based on the ontological case studies of indigenous Australian with a diverse range of theoretical background, which sometimes I feel quite hard to grasp I like the stories that Sometimes baffled by its many erratic terminologies, I find the concept of geontopower really intriguing Povinelli traces the relation between late liberalism though I m still not sure what is the difference between late liberalism and neoliberalism and of course the good old fashion capitalism and the Anthropocene based on the ontological case studies of indigenous Australian with a diverse range of theoretical background, which sometimes I feel quite hard to grasp I like the stories that relate to the Karrabing Film Collective, though the last chapter on the digital app and how she theorises it was pulled too far to the level I don t find any coherence of that chapter to the whole thesis on the book One passage that really memorable in this book, which when Povinelli argues that capitalism is the purest form of animism Brilliant


  6. Ebiamary Ebiamary says:

    I read this in a seminar, which is probably the right setting for a book this dense It made for some fun discussions, but I think Povinelli could have used a good editor a fewdrafts before publishing If you are interested in ontology epistemology, constructions of nature, and or indigenous issues, this is worth reading.


  7. Roger Green Roger Green says:

    Excellent and current analysis of late liberalism with erudite and interdisciplinary theoretical knowledge Povinelli is able to draw on her work with Karrabing Film Collective to give discussion to distinctions between life and non life that maneuver discussions beyond post humanism while also critically examining anthropocentricism.


  8. Nathaniel Nathaniel says:

    Life is merely a moment in the greater dynamic unfolding of Nonlife And thus Life is devoured from a geological perspective under the pressure of the Anthropocene and the Meteorocene Life is merely another internal organ of a planet that will still be here when it is not, when we are not, undergoing its unfolding, creating who knows what Will Life be a relevant concept there


  9. Lette Hass Lette Hass says:

    I just finished reading, highlyrecommended Povinelli describes a mode of power she calls geontopower, which operates through the regulation of the distinction between Life and Nonlife and the figures of the Desert, the Animist, and the Virus


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