Paperback Ù Metrófago Epub ↠


Metrófago [Download] ➵ Metrófago ➾ Richard Kadrey – Thomashillier.co.uk Bienvenidos a Los ngeles , donde imperan la furia, el hambre y la enfermedad, y la vida y la esperanza se hallan estrictamente racionadas ste es el hogar de Jonny Qabbala, ex miembro del comit para el Bienvenidos a Los ngeles , donde imperan la furia, el hambre y la enfermedad, y la vida y la esperanza se hallan estrictamente racionadas ste es el hogar de Jonny Qabbala, ex miembro del comit para el Bienestar P blico, la polic a paralela que impone la ley a su manera, traficante de drogas y medicamentos y eterno perdedor Su reino es la calle su mercanc a, las drogas que curan el cuerpo y enfr an la mente su nica ambici n sobrevivirPero las cosas est n dif ciles en un mundo que se descompone, en unos Estados Unidos convertidos en una provincia econ mica de Jap n, en una sociedad enfrentada a las nuevas potencias rabes y con unas alien genas Ratas de Alfa gravitando sobre nuestras cabezas, desde la Luna, como una nueva Espada de DamoclesPero nada es lo que parece entre las ruinas del antiguo esplendor norteamericano Y Jonny no tardar en descubrirlo.

    Paperback Ù Metrófago Epub ↠ nueva Espada de DamoclesPero nada es lo que parece entre las ruinas del antiguo esplendor norteamericano Y Jonny no tardar en descubrirlo."/>
  • Paperback
  • 247 pages
  • Metrófago
  • Richard Kadrey
  • Spanish
  • 15 July 2019
  • 8433440470

About the Author: Richard Kadrey

Richard Kadrey is a writer and freelance photographer living in San Francisco, best known for his Sandman Slim novels His newest novels are The Everything Box, released April , and The Perdition Score Sandman Slim, , released on June , .



10 thoughts on “Metrófago

  1. Josiah Hawkins Josiah Hawkins says:

    Technology surrounds us everywhere, as I write this review there are two other laptops in the room, a television, a tablet, and a smart phone If we leave this room and expand to the whole house you ll find threeTVs, another computer, another tablet, two other smart phones, a Blu Ray player, a PlayStation 3 and 4, and three iPod s This is the head space that we live in now, a world so steeped in technology that it permeates our entire life and will only continue to do so as we relentlessl Technology surrounds us everywhere, as I write this review there are two other laptops in the room, a television, a tablet, and a smart phone If we leave this room and expand to the whole house you ll find threeTVs, another computer, another tablet, two other smart phones, a Blu Ray player, a PlayStation 3 and 4, and three iPod s This is the head space that we live in now, a world so steeped in technology that it permeates our entire life and will only continue to do so as we relentlessly move forward It is an advanced version of our world that Metrophage lives in, a world of virtual reality and pleasure, of instant gratification, of ultra violence, ultra drugs, augmented bodies, and a ruined government It is a result of this tireless world building that elevates Metrophage beyond that of your average Science Fiction or Cyberpunk novel, but the world building alone cant make up for its short comings I do want to stress that Mr Kadrey has done an exceptional job crafting the world that Metrophage lives in The governmental climate was very interesting, the history of The Committee and it s war on the drug trade in Los Angeles, the various drug lords, and all of the technology and inventions that Mr Kadrey brings into the world The biggest problem that this book has is its characters, outside of the main character, Johnny, no one really has much substance, they all seem to exist just to fill roles in the life of our protagonist No one really gets enough time to develop because the plot is always moving, we see some really great outlines that get developed for our characters but they are never really fleshed out enough to make me care about them In particular I didn t feel anything for the sense of longing that Johnny had over the two women in his life, we hear about the conflict they had with one another and their problems but none of it is explained why I dont know why Johnny loves Sumi and Ice so much and I dont know why they need to be near one another, and these characterization issues are present among almost everyone in the novel except for the protagonist The other problem is a lack of focus, Mr Kadrey has so many plot threads running that I really dont understand what is going on sometimes The novel starts out simply enough with Johnny being tasked to bring a drug lord in to the Committee, but then we hear about a group of aliens that have taken over the moon, a revolution to dethrone the Committee and release the death grip it has on Los Angeles, and it isn t until really far into the novel that the main conflict is even introduced By the time that conflict comes to the forefront so much else is going on that it can be very hard to understand just what is presented in front of you and how it all fits together Even as I write this review I m not entirely sure what actually happened, how different groups fit together, and just how the conflict came to be These are really glaring issues and the way the book ends gives me no actual resolution, it was just disappointing and made me feel terrible Don t get me wrong, those kinds of endings can be fantastic, just look at Gone Girl for example But the difference here is that Metrophage s ending is hollow, it has no real resolution of any kind, nothing was solved, nothing was gained, all that exists at the books finale is loss seemingly for the sake of loss I give this book two stars because the setting is amazing, and the things that fill it are incredible My writing mentor once told me that a book is like a snow globe, the setting is the glass sphere, the buildings and politics and technology are the buildings, and the people are the statues inside This snow globe is beautiful to look at but a rapture has happened, and someone has taken all of the people

  2. Simon Mcleish Simon Mcleish says:

    The problem with cyberpunk as a subgenre of science fiction is that there were too few top class writers involved Apart from William Gibson and Bruce Sterling and perhaps K.W Jeter , it would be hard now to name another cyberpunk writer from its heyday, the mid eighties The influence of the genre which is considerable is really the influence of Gibson and Sterling, together with that of the film Bladerunner.Kadrey s first novel is one of the forgotten cyberpunk also rans It is told from The problem with cyberpunk as a subgenre of science fiction is that there were too few top class writers involved Apart from William Gibson and Bruce Sterling and perhaps K.W Jeter , it would be hard now to name another cyberpunk writer from its heyday, the mid eighties The influence of the genre which is considerable is really the influence of Gibson and Sterling, together with that of the film Bladerunner.Kadrey s first novel is one of the forgotten cyberpunk also rans It is told from the point of view of a drug dealer in decaying Los Angeles, who gets caught up in the events which surround an epidemic of a new virus rather like leprosy which is decimating the city There are naturally clear parallels with the AIDS scare, at its height at the time of writing, but Kadrey doesn t really have anything of interest to say about contemporary events, something which prevents his novel being first class.Like many first novels, Metrophage wears its influences on its sleeve, and it is actually quite interesting to catalogue them as you read it The principal immediate influence is of course William Gibson, and the earlier writers who helped form Gibson are many of them clearly direct influences as well, from William S Burroughs to Raymond Chandler The whole coverage of AIDS and especially suspicions that it originated in a laboratory is the one thing without which the novel could not have been written, though earlier plague themed science fiction such as The Andromeda Strain probably plays a part.Metrophage is not a great novel, but for the unsqueamish it is an enjoyable read

  3. Sara Lastine Sara Lastine says:

    The cyberpunk novel, Metrophage, by Richard Kadrey shows the life of Jonny, the cliche bounty hunter street punk that seems to roam every street in a cyberpunk world He finds himself wrapped up in the affairs of the organization he used to work for, the Committee for Public Health, and finds himself torn from his mundane bounty hunter life to a spiraling adventure Despite this being the main focus, it is almost drowned out by a backdrop of gangs and cartels, aliens and drug lords Even in the The cyberpunk novel, Metrophage, by Richard Kadrey shows the life of Jonny, the cliche bounty hunter street punk that seems to roam every street in a cyberpunk world He finds himself wrapped up in the affairs of the organization he used to work for, the Committee for Public Health, and finds himself torn from his mundane bounty hunter life to a spiraling adventure Despite this being the main focus, it is almost drowned out by a backdrop of gangs and cartels, aliens and drug lords Even in the early chapters, we hear talk of the alpha rats and the zombies This is quite common in cyberpunk literature Street culture is, of course, as shown by the name, a major part of this genre The best way to describe a Metrophage would be, confusing It tells of so many street cultures, gangs and cartels and alien colonies and past wars It brings up plot points, only to forget about them It is an entertaining read, but the backdrop draws away from the story itself In cyberpunk, there is a fine line between immersing the reader in your world, and drowning them with so many obscure details that they don t know who the main character is Metrophage leaped off this balance beam with a running start It explained opso many minute details that I felt to be reading a history book A badly written history book that doesn t explain anything s significance Metrophage is a good read, but many times I had to reread a page because I was so focused on what this gang is up to that I forgot what Jonny was doing The cyberpunk novel Metrophage by Richard Kadrey tells a great story with plenty of twists and turns, but the story he was trying to tell is drowned out by the world he is trying to weave

  4. Mark Mark says:

    I ve been reading and enjoying Kadrey s Sandman Slim novels recently, but I wasn t familiar with any of his earlier books To my surprise, this book was sitting on a shelf in my office I must have bought it years ago with several other New Ace Science Fiction Specials Published in 1988, Metrophage is set in a hellish 21st century Los Angeles With Japanese, Mexican and Middle Eastern corporations and oil cartels in control of a drug addicted, modified populace, nearly every character is thinki I ve been reading and enjoying Kadrey s Sandman Slim novels recently, but I wasn t familiar with any of his earlier books To my surprise, this book was sitting on a shelf in my office I must have bought it years ago with several other New Ace Science Fiction Specials Published in 1988, Metrophage is set in a hellish 21st century Los Angeles With Japanese, Mexican and Middle Eastern corporations and oil cartels in control of a drug addicted, modified populace, nearly every character is thinking about survival and little else It s a bleak look our future, with an unsettling ending, in that nearly all the characters we might want to care about are dead and Jonny, who s been drifting with the tide, trying to make sense of what s happened around him, has been picked up by another wave and is heading out of town Kadrey s story got me thinking Are we almost in his hell

  5. Karissa Karissa says:

    I got a copy of this novel to review through NetGalley This was a well done and gritty cyberpunk novel Previously I have read a variety of cyberpunk, mostly books by William Gibson and some of Neal Stephenson s earlier works Diamond Age and Snow Crash I didn t like this book quite as much as those books, but I still thought it was a fun read.The story is set in future a Los Angeles where everything has pretty much gone to the dogs Our hero actuallyof an anti hero is Johnny He s I got a copy of this novel to review through NetGalley This was a well done and gritty cyberpunk novel Previously I have read a variety of cyberpunk, mostly books by William Gibson and some of Neal Stephenson s earlier works Diamond Age and Snow Crash I didn t like this book quite as much as those books, but I still thought it was a fun read.The story is set in future a Los Angeles where everything has pretty much gone to the dogs Our hero actuallyof an anti hero is Johnny He s hustler that sells drugs to those who need them on the streets He used to be part of a government organization that loosely enforced the law in Los Angeles, but he gave that up to avoid being burned out by all the stimulants the government feeds their agents However Johnny s past comes back to haunt him when the government hears rumors that Johnny is involved with the Alpha Rats The whole conspiracy is news to Johnny, but his involvement gets deeper when he one of his friends gets sick with the strange leprosy like disease that is plaguing the streets Now Johnny is on a mission to help cure this disease.This book is full of Kadrey s gritty style, one liners and over the top dialogue For those who have read and loved his Sandman Slim series, the writing style of this book is similar is a bit less refined.Johnny is a typical anti hero He is mostly out for himself but somehow ends up trying to save humanity through a series of chance encounters and mishaps He is self destructive to a fault, but also has a canny ability to survive almost everything If Johnny has a super power it is survivaland maybe fast talking.I enjoyed a lot of the side characters as well They are all quirky and I wish we had gotten to get to know them a bit better Johnny s housemates are two woman named Ice and Sumi Each of them are very intriguing and have their own quirky set of abilities The strange good guy bad guy Conovan is another interesting character he has lived for a very long time due to a life extending drug that is basically rotting his body from the inside out.The story is a bit of a mish mash of topics There is some government conspiracy, potential alien invasion, discussion on drug trafficking, a commentary on the medical community, as well as a dissolute community s response to plague The book is fast paced and honestly a bit crazy at points.I ended up really enjoying it It s a very dark story but there are crazy new things around each corneryou just never know what the next page is going to hold It reminds a bit of Simon Green s The Nightside series from that aspect You never know what strangely deviant and decadent atrocity you are going to be reading about next.There is a ton of over the top violence here and it is truly a thing of beauty There s even a whole cult of people in here who practice violence as beauty Not necessarily a book for the faint of heart, but if you have read Kadrey s other books you already know that There are also some very explicit sex scenes between Johnny and the two women he loves Overall this was a crazy and fun read It s a very dark and gritty tale and at times has a bit of ADD going on However I enjoyed all the crazy people and things we meet throughout the story, you really never know what you are going to be reading about from page to page I also enjoyed all the action Like the Sandman Slim series this book is not for the faint of heart It is also not quite as good as other cyberpunk novels out there While I would recommend reading William Gibson or early Neal Stephenson books first if you want to check out the cyberpunk genre, I would say if you have read those and wantcyberpunk this book is a decent option It s crazily creative and definitely entertaining

  6. Danigerous Danigerous says:

    I started this with a little bit of apprehension It said it was the first published novel of Richard Kadrey s Not that there is anything bad about it, and I m not implying that being the first one it s supposed to be bad, but sometimes when you have read some of thefamous works of a certain author, the earlier not so popular ones somehow pale in comparison.It s interesting how all the earlier pre Sandman Slim novels all seem to be evolutionary steps towards the development of the James S I started this with a little bit of apprehension It said it was the first published novel of Richard Kadrey s Not that there is anything bad about it, and I m not implying that being the first one it s supposed to be bad, but sometimes when you have read some of thefamous works of a certain author, the earlier not so popular ones somehow pale in comparison.It s interesting how all the earlier pre Sandman Slim novels all seem to be evolutionary steps towards the development of the James Stark character Jonny seems like the original prototype and then Spyder Lee goes one step further in the direction towards the final image of Stark And this one is also based in post apocalyptic dystopian L.A or Last Ass as it is dubbed as in the Sandman Slim series Also I couldn t help but make some sort of a parallel Ice Candy and Sumi Alice, but that maybe is me overdoing it a little It also had some parts that were similar to Johnny Mnemonic with its references to Yakuza and the overall Japanese themed references Whereas his later novels, namely Butcherbird and the Sandman Slim series areurban fantasy, Metrophage ishigh tech, therefore closer to the cyberpunk genre It, definitely, is not lacking in action and plot twists All in all, I d say it was a pretty good first novel for Kadrey

  7. John John says:

    I got about halfway through and found myself begrudging the idea of carrying on, so I decided to call it quits It had some good ideas but ultimately the lack of characters that stuck around long enough to get invested in really hurt its chances of making an impact

  8. Grace Grace says:

    A very enjoyable read.

  9. Aricia Gavriel Aricia Gavriel says:

    Cyberpunk is field I never got into decades ago, when it was fresh and pertinent, and now, alas, as an SF sub genre is seems rather pass I did read some cyberpunk, just as I ve read some steampunk, but it would be fair to say these arts never spoke to me so I m probably able to see the wood for the trees with a littleclarity than readers who re steeped in these genres Metrophage struck me as very much a first work from a writer who d eventually go on to great things It s a short Cyberpunk is field I never got into decades ago, when it was fresh and pertinent, and now, alas, as an SF sub genre is seems rather pass I did read some cyberpunk, just as I ve read some steampunk, but it would be fair to say these arts never spoke to me so I m probably able to see the wood for the trees with a littleclarity than readers who re steeped in these genres Metrophage struck me as very much a first work from a writer who d eventually go on to great things It s a short ish novel that certainly shows much potential, so it s not surprising that Richard Kadrey went on to hit the NYT best seller list, with at least one novel filmed I guess everyone needs to start somewhere, and Metrophage is a debut somewhat shaky, but promising.Perhaps it s cyberpunk as a genre that s tired by now by 2018, we couldn t exist without our tech The only thing we don t do yet is plug in our brains That s about tenyears away, along with the holographic displays you see in the Iron Man films Metrophage dates from 88, and at the time was out there on the cutting edge of tech, but but It s too much punk, not enough cyber The backgrounding for the anarchistic story is wall to wall grunge, in a thoroughly despoiled Los Angeles Everything is corroding Everything stinks, including the people Everything is trash, including yep Halfway through, the reader is simply tired of grime, filth and weirdness for the sake of weirdness The anarchistic storyline itself is extremely simple, overlaid by a wealth of embellishment, a world of creativity If Kadrey had staged his story against less fetid and weird backdrops, I wonder if the plot might have be able to stand on its own, robbed of its ornament Perhaps it would have been stronger, if the reader were not so put off by non stop description of trash Or perhaps the grunge is actually a major player in the piece, and without it, Metrophage might till be languishing in a desk drawer Good question The book is hampered by fundamentally iffy writing, which only time and experience can cure but which a good editor could have straightened out in 1988, if s he had wanted to Example I ve never understood why writers must hammer constantly on a character s name, stating it scores of times, when there is no other character in the scene Kadrey will quote Jonny four times in a single paragraph, while Jonny is alone After a while, it s irritating He s not alone in this habit, nor the worst A terrible offender was Ernest Hemingway, whose Islands in the Stream makes me want so scream, with its use of Thomas Hudson, every single time Tom s name is quoted throughout 435pp Take out every unnecessary Hudson or Thomas , the book would have been 100pp shorter Kadrey s plot isn t bad but it s a grasshopper story, as our Jonny travels from place to place, group to group, too briefly meeting people, leaving them behind, in a kind of quest Strip away the set dressing, this is what you re left with quest fiction, which is fair enough, though the novel is so brief at 90k words, short shrift is given to each group of characters, leaving the reader dangerously uninvolved.This has been described as one of the quintessential 1980s cyberpunk novels, and this does surprise me I have to say, William Gibson did the cyber part better Neuromancer, in 1984 Punk is a genre I ve read, but didn t keep the paperbacks and honestly can t recall any of them, after thirty years In order words, I wasn t terribly impressed In fact, the cyberpunk that did make a huge impression on me was Mel Keegan s Mindspace, which lived on its cyber, and didn t overdo the punk The last remark I ll make on Metrophage is, if this is your kind of thing buy a copy The freebie epub is such a mess of typos and assorted typesetting gaffes, the sheer volume of errors jeopardizes the reading experience Pay a few bucks, maybe pick it up used not thatis a great place to shop for used books now 1.29 for the book, sure plus 3.99 for shipping Ouch Two stars or three I m hovering around 2.5, because Metrophage is inventive, fast paced, and in its day must have been quite visionary I don t not recommend it, but know what you re getting into

  10. Bruce Baugh Bruce Baugh says:

    This is a story about Los Angeles in the middle of the 21st century, about a young man s search for some justice or at least some revenge as everyone with authority busily screws over everyone they can reach, and about keeping the spirit alive in spite of everything Jonny Qabbala is at the center of things here, a street guy drifting and dealing his way as best he can, doing a bit of good sometimes, trying to care for the people he loves, and out to avenge a friend s execution.His LA is not qui This is a story about Los Angeles in the middle of the 21st century, about a young man s search for some justice or at least some revenge as everyone with authority busily screws over everyone they can reach, and about keeping the spirit alive in spite of everything Jonny Qabbala is at the center of things here, a street guy drifting and dealing his way as best he can, doing a bit of good sometimes, trying to care for the people he loves, and out to avenge a friend s execution.His LA is not quite an anarchy the government s pretty well given up on it, with the police ineffectual as well as brutal and real power in the hands of the Committee for Public Health Jonny s ex Committee himself, and that s part of what makes him a target now.Alongside Jonny s personal quest, we have the Committee looking for a way to break the power of the smuggler lords who hold most of LA s wealth, a smuggler lord whom Jonny s worked for with in the past and his elaborate schemes for survival, escape, and control, the growing calamity of a viral leprosy, the anarchist doctors trying to treat it, andIt s a very busy kaleidoscope, but I never felt lost in it Kadrey has a real talent for succinctly anchoring new and returning elements with descriptions connecting them to the rest Inevitably, of course, everything and everybody runs into everyone else The final chapters are an epic study in just how many people can fail to get what they want.I wasn t much older than Jonny is in the book when I first read it, in a year during which I developed brand new complications from a very rare illness that d take another decade to diagnose I never really thought about that element of connection until listening to the audiobook version of this novel s re release No doubt that s part of why it s haunted my sub consciousthan a lot of other really good books from the same era But it is haunting worthy even without that.One thing that strikes me, too, on re reading it now is how depressingly relevant it feels all over again There were a lot of dystopic futures from the 80s that felt on their way to obsolescence com the 90s better societies not perfect, just better would offset or even rein in the concentrations of economic power that drove the social misery befalling most of their inhabitants A quarter century later, though, we ve got whole towns quite willing to turn off significant fractions of their street lights rather than risk any tax increases and a major political party whose leaders publicly call for increased suffering for the poor The ultra rich aren t going to pay for the massive city domes found in Gibson s Sprawl, because they simply don t care enough about the world outside their own little orbit But the enclaves like New Hope and the smuggler lords willingness to let LA just crumble The parents and grandparents of the smuggler lords are out preaching doctrines just like that now I wish I could say that it all felt as obsolete as it did a decade after this book s publication, but reality isn t so obliging Metrophage isn t a perfect book In particular, it makes somewhat ham handed use of surrealist imagery and allusions I suppose it paid off, in that mentions in this book drove me to look up Max Ernst s collage novels and Situationist essays later But I d have liked someexplanation in the novel Jonny would be a good argument for a quick guide to some of the recurring slogans In fairness, there s a passage where Jonny compares the LA of his experience to a surrealist gallery and finds a lot of direct parallels that just really shines The audiobook version, read by Peter Ganim, is a delight Gaming does Southern California accents from various socio economic levels way I had some major nostalgia rushes listening to him it s been a long time since I lived there, but memories came back strong, and the nuances helped ground the story well Ganim also narrates sex scenes well, in a straightforward style that lets the text do its thing on the reader s imagination Deeply satisfying, highly recommended I am very glad this book is readily accessible again

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