Teuflisch gutes Webdesign: Wie Sie Ihre Kunden in

Teuflisch gutes Webdesign: Wie Sie Ihre Kunden in Versuchung führen [Reading] ➿ Teuflisch gutes Webdesign: Wie Sie Ihre Kunden in Versuchung führen By Chris Nodder – Thomashillier.co.uk Ihre Kunden sollen Ihre Website lieben Sich dort so richtig wohlf hlen und dabei das tun, was Sie m chten In einer furiosen Mischung aus Psychologie, Marketing und Design zeigt Ihnen Chris Nodder, wie Ihre Kunden sollen Ihre Website lieben Sich dort Webdesign: Wie PDF Å so richtig wohlf hlen und dabei das tun, was Sie m chten In einer furiosen Mischung aus Psychologie, Marketing und Design zeigt Ihnen Chris Nodder, wie Teuflisch gutes Epub / es geht Er spricht aus, was wir alle wissen Wir haben kleine Schw chen Wir m chten dazugeh ren, Dinge umsonst bekommen, uns nicht allzu sehr anstrengen, nicht Nein sagen m ssen und vieles andere gutes Webdesign: Wie PDF Ê mehr Auf diesen kleinen Schw chen aufbauend gibt er Ihnen einfach umzusetzende Designmuster an die Hand, mit denen Sie die Benutzung Ihrer Website f r Ihre Kunden besonders angenehm gestalten k nnen oder zumindest die T tigkeiten, die Sie sich von Ihren Kunden w nschen Die unz hligen Beispiele aus allen Schlupfwinkeln des Internets machen die Erkl rungen dabei noch anschaulicher Danach liegt es an Ihnen Lassen Sie sich in Versuchung f hren und wechseln mit Ihrem neuen Wissen auf die dunkle Seite der Macht oder setzen Sie es zum Wohle der Menschheit ein.


10 thoughts on “Teuflisch gutes Webdesign: Wie Sie Ihre Kunden in Versuchung führen

  1. Ahmad hosseini Ahmad hosseini says:

    Sloth, pride, envy, greed, lust, anger, gluttony The list of seven deadly sins provides a nice, tidy statement of fundamental human behavior Each chapter in this book addresses one of these sins, pointing out the human characteristics that enable software designer to create persuasive interfaces that appeal to each weakness.The 57 patterns described in this book are strong mechanisms for persuasion They can be used in digital and physical products to increase customer loyalty or to attract ne Sloth, pride, envy, greed, lust, anger, gluttony The list of seven deadly sins provides a nice, tidy statement of fundamental human behavior Each chapter in this book addresses one of these sins, pointing out the human characteristics that enable software designer to create persuasive interfaces that appeal to each weakness.The 57 patterns described in this book are strong mechanisms for persuasion They can be used in digital and physical products to increase customer loyalty or to attract new customers In addition, you can use this information to recognize and avoid being personally persuaded by these principles when they appear in sites you use.But why should design be based on evil Simple starting with evil means starting with real human behavior This doesn t mean that the result is evil It means that understanding what each sin represents ads to an understanding of people and good design results from good understanding


  2. Ben Rogers Ben Rogers says:

    An excellent book on evil design Is evil design to the benefit of the corporation done on purpose, or by accident Some of the examples of this book really uncovered the underlying motives and seedy practices of design I learned a lot, and it was really fascinating how much influence you can have on someone by these little nudges Great information to know as a digital marketer Oh, and Chris is amazing on LiL.4.3 5


  3. Karen Mardahl Karen Mardahl says:

    This book was not what I thought it was It was a selection for my UX book club, and it sounded like a fun title Without reading that much about it and knowing the context, I thought it would hold some concrete tips for design It did It didn t What this book really was, in my opinion, was a look at behaviour of people using our products and services and taking some lessons from those behaviours Coincidentally, I am reading Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman just now I am reading This book was not what I thought it was It was a selection for my UX book club, and it sounded like a fun title Without reading that much about it and knowing the context, I thought it would hold some concrete tips for design It did It didn t What this book really was, in my opinion, was a look at behaviour of people using our products and services and taking some lessons from those behaviours Coincidentally, I am reading Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman just now I am reading it at a slower pace for a reading group at work I sensed some echoes from Kahneman while reading what Nodder had to say Perhaps this book isof a behavioural economics 101 for UX people I am fine with that I also thought of another book while reading this one Machiavelli s The Prince Low and behold, this is no spoiler , Nodder opens the last section of the book with a mention of Machiavelli and what he put into The Prince I could only smile Machiavelli merely presented some data on how to survive as a merchant prince 500 years ago Nodder is not a Machiavelli in the sense that we usually toss that name about But Nodder does point out various behaviours the behaviour of designers and businesses and the behaviour of users and what the consequences of this and that can be I look forward to finishing Kahneman s book and then coming back to skim this book onceI did have a few issues which I did not mark so I cannot go back to them where I found it hard to see why that exact example was a part of that specific sin There were very few of those issues All in all, it was a clever way to discuss what I would call persuasive design or nudging with only a peripheral knowledge of those areas I would that think that if you are serious about the topics in this book, you will move on to books like Cialdini s Influence The Psychology of Persuasion, mentioned in the reference section.In short, this is a thinking book What I mean is, there are no concrete work tips like use drop down lists for this or use a chat bot for that It s about thinking about what you are trying to achieve If you are willing to make room for the user which I argue you should be , then it s getting inside the user s head and finding out what makes them tick and what can make them content and happy It s the abstract side of work that is sometimes neglected in the rush to use the latest design trick on a website or in an app It s about stopping up to think what is going on and what experience or journey is about to unfold We do not know all the answers Like Don Norman writes in his blurb on the cover of my paperback, The seven sins are all around us, easy to spot But the designs that apply the underlying behavioral forces that underpin the sins are harder to discern That s why we need this book Do like Don Norman did Read the book and learn


  4. Wendelle Wendelle says:

    This is an edifying book that shows how online advertising or site design can make use of psychological techniques to prey on our fallibility to pride, greed, sloth, lust, gluttony, anger and wrath and to keep us buying and patronizing a product.


  5. Chris Branch Chris Branch says:

    Why would software designers and developers intentionally create software that is unethical This book, provides, perhaps inadvertently, a telling explanation Nodder presents and describes the variety of methods used by software producers to persuade software consumers to behave in ways that benefit the designer He frames the discussion in terms of the Biblical seven deadly sins as a way of linking modern uses of technology to aspects of psychology that have existed throughout human history Why would software designers and developers intentionally create software that is unethical This book, provides, perhaps inadvertently, a telling explanation Nodder presents and describes the variety of methods used by software producers to persuade software consumers to behave in ways that benefit the designer He frames the discussion in terms of the Biblical seven deadly sins as a way of linking modern uses of technology to aspects of psychology that have existed throughout human history While the book is engagingly written and informative if a bit dated in its web site references , Nodder avoids taking an ethical stand against the use of these techniques He leaves it largely up to the reader as to how this information is to be used, and has no qualms against explicitly providing advice to designers that could objectively be considered unethical For example, in the chapter on Pride, he suggests that designers Persuade your users to give you access to post to their social media accounts You probably don t have to be deceptive and in the chapter on Greed, he recommends Artificially inflate the cost of your secondary object or reduce its feature set desirability to make the primary object appear as a comparatively good value for money, even though it isexpensive In a summarizing chapter at the end of the book, readers are given justifications for using persuasive techniques The author points out that There is a continuum from persuasion to deception and provides several anecdotes, including the use of an anti monster spray for scared children and the use of a fake bus stop near a facility for Alzheimer s patients to give them a sense of agency First, it should be noted that these chosen cases involve precisely examples of vulnerable populations children and those with mental illness whose members should _not_ be subjected to potentially unethical tactics Second, these are undeniably exceptional cases, so even if these situations do justify the ethical use of deception, this does not make it valid for a software producer to conclude by extension that the use of persuasion or deception is ethical in the particular case they are concerned with Nodder even pushes back against the Golden Rule of persuasion proposed by Berdichevsky and Neuenschwander in their 1999 paper As an argument against the idea that The creators of a persuasive technology should never seek to persuade anyone of something they themselves would not consent to be persuaded of , Nodder asks, for example Is it okay for a smoker to make an iPhone app to help others quit smoking and concludes that even deception and coercion can be very practically applied toward positive ends Further, he reminds the reader that it s okay to make money, suggesting that software producers will need to discover for themselves the boundary that distinguishes good business practice from evil design It s certainly true that software developers are not being intentionally evil rather, they are driven by the same long standing incentives, financial and otherwise, that affect all of us But given the amount of persuasion taking place today via technology that many of us have become dependent on, it s worth asking if we want to live in a world in which developers are encouraged to use such tactics


  6. Kit Sunde Kit Sunde says:

    It s an okay book on creating incentives and getting users to perform the actions you want As the name suggests quite a lot of it gives examples of morally questionable tricks that would be difficult to blanked apply to any website, especially if you re seeking to retain users and trust Which is not a criticism of the book, if anything it makes it perfectly clear what the expected consequences and result would be.The author does give references, if sometimes anecdotally and sometimes on studie It s an okay book on creating incentives and getting users to perform the actions you want As the name suggests quite a lot of it gives examples of morally questionable tricks that would be difficult to blanked apply to any website, especially if you re seeking to retain users and trust Which is not a criticism of the book, if anything it makes it perfectly clear what the expected consequences and result would be.The author does give references, if sometimes anecdotally and sometimes on studies done in industries in the real world I m unconvinced that grouping the lessons by the 7 sins is useful or will help me recall any of the lessons in the future.All in all, the book wasinformative than I thought it would be


  7. Elvi Nissen Elvi Nissen says:

    I read this for a bookclub meeting The evening s discussion mostly revolved around the feeling that it was a somewhat forced book.The idea of manipulating directing the user by appealing to our inclination towards the seven deathly sins is fun But the execution fell somewhat short Many of the examples in the seven first chapters one for each sin seemed a little sought, and the author seemed to struggle a bit a distinguishing, for example, Greed and Lust Lust becamecuriosity.The I read this for a bookclub meeting The evening s discussion mostly revolved around the feeling that it was a somewhat forced book.The idea of manipulating directing the user by appealing to our inclination towards the seven deathly sins is fun But the execution fell somewhat short Many of the examples in the seven first chapters one for each sin seemed a little sought, and the author seemed to struggle a bit a distinguishing, for example, Greed and Lust Lust becamecuriosity.The book was also clearly directed at an American audience For example, free is not a plus in Denmark we have a natural skepticism when stuff is free Cheap on the other hand We ll take the plunge anytime Some reflections on cultural differences would have suited the book The sins may be universal, but they manifest themselves differently depending on the congregation.We also missed examples of where our sinning could be used positively It would probably go against the title of the book, however But positive friction is somewhatuseful in our minds.That being said, the last chapters of ethics when using this the of manipulation and the overview of the 57 tricks were actually good They gave food for thought and were not as annoying as the rest of the book


  8. Julia Kulgavchuk Julia Kulgavchuk says:

    The book uses religious categories to structure dark patterns in design Natural inclinations and curiosities of humans are archaically labelled as deadly sins and that terminology is used throughout the book I see it as a categorical mistake Is the use of sin ironic If it is, Nodder fails to communicate the irony.


  9. Joona Joona says:

    An easy to read book that points out many tactics used by websites to steer and manipulate their users Most of the insights aren t anything complex, pretty common sense stuff but interesting nevertheless thanks to many real world examples provided.


  10. Marcus Cramer Marcus Cramer says:

    If you have read books on bias, heuristics and behavioral economics, you will be familiar with most of the ideas It is still a great collection and a great read for people involved in product ux design.


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