Hippias Minor Epub ↠ Paperback


    Free Unlimited eBook was equally false and true and so was Achilles b Socrates proposes, possibly for the sheer dialectical fun of it, that it is better to do evil voluntarily than involuntarily His case rests largely on the analogy with athletic skills, such as running and wrestling He says that a runner or wrestler who deliberately sandbags is better than the one who plods along because he can do no better."/>
  • Paperback
  • 34 pages
  • Hippias Minor
  • Plato
  • 06 January 2019
  • 1515146111

10 thoughts on “Hippias Minor

  1. David Sarkies David Sarkies says:

    A Question of Lies7 February 2020 There are a few things that are explored here, one of them being the question of whether somebody can do wrong willingly This is one of those things that Plato has explored previously, in that bad people are only bad due to their ignorance though this is not necessarily something that I would agree with However, the question that is asked in this dialogue is who is the better liar Achilles or Odysseus Well, that is an interesting question because nobody w A Question of Lies7 February 2020 There are a few things that are explored here, one of them being the question of whether somebody can do wrong willingly This is one of those things that Plato has explored previously, in that bad people are only bad due to their ignorance though this is not necessarily something that I would agree with However, the question that is asked in this dialogue is who is the better liar Achilles or Odysseus Well, that is an interesting question because nobody would expect Achillies to lie, particularly since most, if not all, of the time he is portrayed as a straight shooter Well, there is one instance where he tells one thing to Odysseus, and another to Ajax, but Socrates refutes this because Achillies never actually carries out his threat The thing was that Achillies said that he was going to leave the war and sail away, and in my mind, this isn t a lie, but rather one of Achillies spats that he was throwing because he wasn t getting his own way As for Odysseus, well, we all know that he is a perpetual liar, though one commentary that I read or rather watched on Youtube claims that he was actually set apart from the rest of the Greek warriors because he survived purely through cunning The thing with the Greek warrior was that Achillies was intended to be portrayed as the best type of warrior, since he would stand against his enemies and fight them, well, as a proper warrior would Odysseus was different in that he used cunning to survive, and Paris was also different in that he was an archer, something that reeked of cowardice back in those days which differentiated him from his brother Hector, who was a warrior in the same style of Achillies The thing is that as we follow Odysseus in his journeys, both in Troy and elsewhere, we see that he is always looking for cunning ways to defeat his enemy, and the wooden horse is a case in point One interesting thing that Socrates points out is that to be an effective liar, one needs to be an expert in the subject that they are lying about Well, that is sort of true, but I would say that an expert liar would need to have a godlike memory because once you start contradicting yourself, your craftily constructed lies start to unravel In fact, I always seem to find myself looking for holes in things that people tell me,likely out of force of habit than anything else Yet, the biggest question, one that isn t necessarily answered here, is whether somebody who truly believes something to be true and claims that it is true, is actually lying Take holocaust deniers for instance We all know that the evidence points to the holocaust taking place, but there are too many people out there who believe otherwise Or how about the moon landing Is somebody who truly believes that the moon landing was faked a liar Sure, these two types of people no doubt will reject evidence to the contrary, but does a sincere belief in a falsehood make somebody a liar In a way I guess this is something that Socrates may have been touching upon, because of the way that he is exploring the idea that a liar has to be an expert in the topic that they are lying about Yet, it seems that ignorance plays a significant part as well but is ignorance and lying the same thing Also, if I was an expert in, well, say computers, why would I lie about the way a computer functions Yet in a way there is also the case that there are people that play upon other people s ignorance the financial industry is rife with them This is an interesting concept though, because there are lies that we tell ourselves, there are lies that people tell so that they get out of trouble, and then there are lies that people tell to get people to support their ideas Then, and Benjamin Disraeli famously said there are also statistics though that could also be a lie


  2. Duffy Pratt Duffy Pratt says:

    Socrates questions Hippias about whether its better for someone to be bad voluntarily, or to be bad involuntarily Hippias takes the conventional view that intentional wrongdoing is worse than unintentional wrongdoing Socrates argues against this position.This is a pretty bad dialogue The writing is much weaker than in other dialogues, and the arguments contain obvious equivocations and thus its easy to poke holes in them Of course, Hippias doesn t do that I think the way to appreciate this Socrates questions Hippias about whether its better for someone to be bad voluntarily, or to be bad involuntarily Hippias takes the conventional view that intentional wrongdoing is worse than unintentional wrongdoing Socrates argues against this position.This is a pretty bad dialogue The writing is much weaker than in other dialogues, and the arguments contain obvious equivocations and thus its easy to poke holes in them Of course, Hippias doesn t do that I think the way to appreciate this dialogue is to see Plato, the ironist, having a little joke Socrates, who argues that it is better to be deliberately bad, make deliberately bad arguments to support his position Hippias doesn t know any better, and he involuntarily makes bad arguments for his position Thus, we see that Socrates, who is intentionally bad in his arguments, is a better dialectician than Hippias So far as that goes, its pretty clever But I suspect Plato went the extra mile Plato, the brilliant writer of dialogues, deliberately wrote this lame dialogue to further support, in an ironic way, the position that its better to be deliberately bad than to be unintentionally bad This is phenomenally clever, but I still want to say that its just better to be good in the first place, and much better than drawing nice distinctions about which is the better turd


  3. S S says:

    Another very short dialogue which concludes in aporia I m still left wondering exactly why I m supposed to think someone who s using an oar wrong on purpose, and hence is a tit, is better or worse than someone who is using it wrong and is simply ignorant they re both still using it wrong maybe this is just my inner consequentialist striking out Apparently Socrates and Hippias didn t seem to know either If you really wanted to define and draw out worth the way that Plato via Socrates and Another very short dialogue which concludes in aporia I m still left wondering exactly why I m supposed to think someone who s using an oar wrong on purpose, and hence is a tit, is better or worse than someone who is using it wrong and is simply ignorant they re both still using it wrong maybe this is just my inner consequentialist striking out Apparently Socrates and Hippias didn t seem to know either If you really wanted to define and draw out worth the way that Plato via Socrates and Hippias is using the term, it seems like the only way to really square it solidly and here I ll show my own ignorance by not leaning on some metaphysical potentiality vs actuality argument or alluding to Plato s own Forms is by factoring in what it would take to correct the issue With someone who knew how to do something and was doing it wrong on purpose, you would simply need to catch them doing it and correct them With someone who was doing it wrong out of ignorance, you would presumably need to teach them how to do that thing There is a higher input of effort needed in the latter case to correct the issue, and so it represents a scenario which costs the community , in time and effort, regardless of the consequence of the action itself this matter seems to turn the whole thing on its head Instead of being context regardless a nonissue , it becomes intensely context specific as a deceitful hedge fund manager or head of government or CFO can do muchdamage than a janitor lying about where he put the Windex Two separate but closely related issues, and a distinction that was untouched here


  4. Illiterate Illiterate says:

    On lying Plato ties virtue to knowledge Perhaps he also shows his ideal of the ordered soul conflicts with moral norms.


  5. Patrycja Patrycja says:

    Really short dialogue with at least two major questionable transitions between meanings of used words which enabled Socrates to achieve aporia But it is still really enjoyable to read and smile at the amount of irony used by philosopher in his statements uttered toward Hippias.


  6. adrix merricat adrix merricat says:

    El nico logro real de mi vida es haber traducido este di logo del griego cl sico as que voy a contarlo aca porque s.


  7. Kuba Kuba says:

    Sokrates zn w imponuje sw b yskotliwo ci.


  8. Alex Robertson Alex Robertson says:

    I really love the parts where Socrates explains why he does what he does Sorta touching.


  9. Michael Owen Michael Owen says:

    I listened to an audio version of this from LibreVox, which I just learned about and seems like a great open source project.I was curious about ancient views of Odysseus after learning from Professor Vandiver s Great Course lecture that he was seen by some during antiquity as a bad guy My own take on Odysseus was quite mixed The episode where he lies about his identity to Laertes is perhaps the most upsetting, especially for me as a father Odysseus is one who gives and receives pain indee I listened to an audio version of this from LibreVox, which I just learned about and seems like a great open source project.I was curious about ancient views of Odysseus after learning from Professor Vandiver s Great Course lecture that he was seen by some during antiquity as a bad guy My own take on Odysseus was quite mixed The episode where he lies about his identity to Laertes is perhaps the most upsetting, especially for me as a father Odysseus is one who gives and receives pain indeed I m not sure what to take at face value in the Odyssey Since Odysseus not the narrator bard is the one recounting thefantastic adventures, you have to wonder if he made the whole thing up Perhaps he needed to explain why he lost all of his men and ships and shacked up with 2 other women for 10 years Well, this curiosity lead me to the Lesser Hippias I hadn t read Plato since I was a teen and then, a bit later, in college When I first read Republic, I remember being amazed When I read it again as an undergradwell, less impressed The sillier parts are in full effect here ridiculous arguments by analogy and word thinking This doesn t really shed any light on the question of Odysseus character, but I suppose it is interesting in other ways 1 The wise may not really know, what they think they know, especially if their knowledge is built on ridiculous analogies and word thinking 2 Ultimately certain knowledge really comes down to values Is it better to be a liar or truthful Some people will pick liar and some will pick truthful I m not sure that logic is really going to change anyone s mind, but I would rather not live among the liars It s like Alisdair MacInyre argues in After Virtue at a fundamental level you must have some set of shared values to engage in reasoned debate the alternative is pure emotivism


  10. Nuska Nuska says:

    Este di logo, nuevamente protagonizado y narrado por S crates, empieza con el final de una charla de Hipias acerca de Aquiles y Odiseo, los personajes de Homero Hipias considera a Aquiles mejor porque es inteligente pero ingenuo y a Odiseo m s astuto S crates lo interroga acerca de esto pregunt ndole qui n obra mejor los ingenuos que hacen mal involuntariamente o los inteligentes que mienten o hacen mal de manera voluntaria Concluyendo en casi todas las artes y saberes que los inteligentes q Este di logo, nuevamente protagonizado y narrado por S crates, empieza con el final de una charla de Hipias acerca de Aquiles y Odiseo, los personajes de Homero Hipias considera a Aquiles mejor porque es inteligente pero ingenuo y a Odiseo m s astuto S crates lo interroga acerca de esto pregunt ndole qui n obra mejor los ingenuos que hacen mal involuntariamente o los inteligentes que mienten o hacen mal de manera voluntaria Concluyendo en casi todas las artes y saberes que los inteligentes que hacen mal voluntariamente son preferibles, Hipias no es capaz de asumir esto en cuanto a la bondad del hombre S crates entones, quiz s por el desprecio de Plat n a Hipias, le dice que est bien que l dude pero que los sabios entiendo sabios por sofistas, como el propio Hipias deber an tener m s claros estos conceptos, de modo que ayudaran a los dem s a aclararse con ellos Todo el di logo destila una cr tica a Hipias en particular por contradecirse y fallar en su argumentaci n y a los sofistas en general


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Hippias Minor[Reading] ➾ Hippias Minor Author Plato – Thomashillier.co.uk Hippias Minor, or On Lying, is thought to be one of Plato s early works Socrates matches wits with an arrogant polymath who is also a smug literary critic Hippias believes that Homer can be taken at f Hippias Minor, or On Lying, is thought to be one of Plato s early works Socrates matches wits with an arrogant polymath who is also a smug literary critic Hippias believes that Homer can be taken at face value, and that Achilles may be believed when he says he hates liars, whereas Odysseus resourceful behavior stems from his ability to lie well b Socrates argues that Achilles is a cunning liar who throws people off the scent of his own deceptions, and that cunning liars are actually the best liars Consequently, Odysseus was equally false and true and so was Achilles b Socrates proposes, possibly for the sheer dialectical fun of it, that it is better to do evil voluntarily than involuntarily His case rests largely on the analogy with athletic skills, such as running and wrestling He says that a runner or wrestler who deliberately sandbags is better than the one who plods along because he can do no better.


About the Author: Plato

Greek Arabic Alternate Spelling Platon, Plat n, Platone Plato is a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and sciencePlato is one of the most important Western philosophers, exerting influence on virtually every figure in philosophy after him His dialogue The Republic is known as the first comprehensive work on political philosophy Plato also contributed foundationally to ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology His student, Aristotle, is also an extremely influential philosopher and the tutor of Alexander the Great of Macedonia.