In the Shadow of Liberty: The Hidden History of Slavery,

In the Shadow of Liberty: The Hidden History of Slavery, Four Presidents, and Five Black Lives ☄ [PDF / Epub] ☃ In the Shadow of Liberty: The Hidden History of Slavery, Four Presidents, and Five Black Lives By Kenneth C. Davis ✓ – Thomashillier.co.uk Did you know that many of America s Founding Fathers who fought for liberty and justice for all were slave owners Through the powerful stories of five enslaved people who were owned by four of our gre Did you know that Shadow of PDF Ë many of America s Founding Fathers who fought for liberty and justice for all were slave owners Through the powerful stories of five enslaved people who were owned by four of our greatest presidents, this book helps set the record straight about the In the ePUB ½ role slavery played in the founding of America From Billy Lee, valet to George Washington, to Alfred Jackson, faithful servant of Andrew Jackson, these dramatic narratives explore our country s great tragedy that a nation conceived in liberty was also born in shacklesThese stories help us know the the Shadow of PDF/EPUB » real people who were essential to the birth of this nation but traditionally have been left out of the history books Their stories are true and they should be heardThis thoroughly researched and documented book can be worked into multiple aspects of the common core curriculum.


About the Author: Kenneth C. Davis

Kenneth C Davis is Shadow of PDF Ë the New York Times bestselling author of the Don t Know Much About series of books and audios for adults and children The first title in the series, Don t Know Much About History became a New York Times bestseller in and In the ePUB ½ remained on the paperback list for consecutive weeks It has since been revised several times and now hasthan million copies in print He is, according to Publishers Weekly, a go to guy for historical insight and analysis AMERICA S HIDDEN HISTORY also became a New York the Shadow of PDF/EPUB » Times bestseller on publication A NATION RISING also uses dramatic narratives to tell the stories your textbooks left out His book, THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF AMERICA AT WAR May , was called searing analysis by Publishers Weekly Kenneth C Davis success aptly makes the case that Americans don t hate history, just the dull version they slept through in class But many of them want to know now because their kids are asking them questions they can t answer Davis s approach is to refresh us on the subjects we should have learned in school He does it by busting myths, setting the record straight and always remembering that fun is not a four word letter wordHis recent book, IN THE SHADOW OF LIBERTY THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF SLAVERY, FOUR PRESIDENTS, AND FIVE BLACK LIVES looks at the lives of five people enslaved by four of America s most famous Presidents and the role of slavery in American history and the presidency In May , his book MORE DEADLY THAN WAR The Hidden History of the Spanish Flu and the First World War was published In October , his book STRONGMAN The Rise of Five Dictators and the Fall of Democracy will be published by Holt.



10 thoughts on “In the Shadow of Liberty: The Hidden History of Slavery, Four Presidents, and Five Black Lives

  1. Kelly Kelly says:

    This should be required reading about American history and slavery Set well before the Civil War, this is an account of five black people who were enslaved to some of American history s greatest men Compelling and horrifying and frustrating lacking in complete stories, Davis offers up the lives of those who history has otherwise selected not to mention Davis s commentary, especially in the afterword, is particularly important He pulls no punches in noting that while many of the enslaved pe This should be required reading about American history and slavery Set well before the Civil War, this is an account of five black people who were enslaved to some of American history s greatest men Compelling and horrifying and frustrating lacking in complete stories, Davis offers up the lives of those who history has otherwise selected not to mention Davis s commentary, especially in the afterword, is particularly important He pulls no punches in noting that while many of the enslaved people in this collection spoke of their work in pleasant enough language, the truth is that it s likely they told only the stories that the white people recording them wanted to hear Likewise, I really appreciated how Davis took the time to not call these people slaves, but enslaved people and expresses precisely why that choice in terminology matters


  2. Ed Ed says:

    Although this is a YA history, I enjoyed reading the factual information in it The lives of the enslaved people serving the four presidents is interesting, much of it new to me I haven t read too many YA books, so I can t really speak to that part The broader issue of slavery is also dealt with, and the timelines are helpful All in all, I was left a satisfied reader.


  3. Cathy Cathy says:

    I didn t realize when I bought this book that it was written for young adults It is a terribly interesting account of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Jackson, four presidents who were also slaveholders, and one each of their slaves An easy read, it also is full of facts and lays out the conflicting views of our founding fathers regarding liberty and slavery Without trying to turn our founding fathers into villains, Davis shows the conflict between what these men said, and what they practi I didn t realize when I bought this book that it was written for young adults It is a terribly interesting account of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Jackson, four presidents who were also slaveholders, and one each of their slaves An easy read, it also is full of facts and lays out the conflicting views of our founding fathers regarding liberty and slavery Without trying to turn our founding fathers into villains, Davis shows the conflict between what these men said, and what they practiced Interesting read


  4. Sarah Hannah Sarah Hannah says:

    This is good, but I don t see it as quite as revolutionary and amazing as so many others seem to That may be a result of the fact that, as a black person and a lifetime avid reader, even untold histories of black people are less astonishing and less likely to have been unencountered to me than they would to a white reader of any age Davis makes a point at the beginning of the book of noting that he strove use the word enslaved over slaves in order to draw attention to the fact that the This is good, but I don t see it as quite as revolutionary and amazing as so many others seem to That may be a result of the fact that, as a black person and a lifetime avid reader, even untold histories of black people are less astonishing and less likely to have been unencountered to me than they would to a white reader of any age Davis makes a point at the beginning of the book of noting that he strove use the word enslaved over slaves in order to draw attention to the fact that these were people, not items, and to drive home how horrifying the institution of slavery was, which is all well and good, except that he s not all that consistent with it Further, he uses servants indiscriminately, and whilethan once he points out that white people called slaves their servants and that is incredibly problematic, but he also does so himself, so I don t think it s really going to drive the point home We all know from the Rue problem and others that white readers need racialized things yelled at them in print a million times before they actually see them.You can read the full review at my blog


  5. Don Don says:

    I am not sure why Kenneth C Davis wrote this as a young adult book Maybe, perhaps, so he can appeal to any reader who hasn t already retreated into an intractable position on the conservative progressive spectrum That s got to be it.OK, the short sentences get annoying, the limited vocabulary and the overexplaining at times feels condescending, but the research is first rate and the context is everything.The Slavery in America Timeline with each chapter is worth the price of admission The st I am not sure why Kenneth C Davis wrote this as a young adult book Maybe, perhaps, so he can appeal to any reader who hasn t already retreated into an intractable position on the conservative progressive spectrum That s got to be it.OK, the short sentences get annoying, the limited vocabulary and the overexplaining at times feels condescending, but the research is first rate and the context is everything.The Slavery in America Timeline with each chapter is worth the price of admission The stories of Ona Judge and Billy Lee and Paul Jennings are not new But they are forever relegated to an occasional paragraph or anecdote in biographies of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and the rest This book offers a very different perspective, which turns these enslaved people into REAL people.Still, I question whether middle school aged kids have the clarity to understand the nuance required for such complex history It seems as though the target audience is 12 14, an age which remains rooted in concrete thinking I d like to think, though, that deeper thinkers of that age group will find this fascinating and find enigmas like George Washington and TJ to be flawed but still brilliant.That s certainly part of the main idea Davis gets across or is it, brilliant but still flawed Either way, this is an important book we don t have to be footnote consuming historians to absorb this very human history Each of the seven chapters tells its own story, and in fact left me wantingI d love to read a similar book featuring freedom fighters like Nat Turner, Olaudah Equiano, William Harvey Carney, Joseph Cinque, and a few others.But in a way, the ordinariness of the protagonists in this collection are what makes it special Each one left me sad and angry And in awe at the same time How in the hell did they live through this, and how did anybody much less our Founding Fathers actually think it was OK Ona Judge s story of escape from the Washingtons, and George s long quest to retrieve her, is probably the most chilling Unless, course, it s Alfred Jackson even enslaved people need last names responding late in life to the ridiculous notion that in heaven, skin color won t matter and he should just bide his time How would you like to be a slave Well, I wouldn t And neither would George Washington and the others It brings to mind one of my favorite Lincoln quotes As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master It s too bad the previous generations of Americans were unable to think and live that deeply


  6. Lois Lois says:

    Meh.This is chattel slavery apologist in tone I d reccomend Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X Kedi, The American Slave Coast by Ned Sublette, The Half Has Never Been Told by Edward E Baptist, Master of the Mountain and An Imperfect God by Henry Wiencek.This is really bad and I m sick that it s being marketed to children.


  7. R. G. Nairam R. G. Nairam says:

    I just wish this was better than it actually is Maybe I m just not the audience the author apparently writes a series called don t know much about history and I have a degree in history but even so, I don t think any audience deserves to be this condescended to.I mentioned in an update that it is very didactic More than once when talking about Washington it mentions that we re taught that false story about the cherry tree but not this terrible contradiction It also asks tons of boring, o I just wish this was better than it actually is Maybe I m just not the audience the author apparently writes a series called don t know much about history and I have a degree in history but even so, I don t think any audience deserves to be this condescended to.I mentioned in an update that it is very didactic More than once when talking about Washington it mentions that we re taught that false story about the cherry tree but not this terrible contradiction It also asks tons of boring, obvious rhetorical questions Davis frequently makes up inner thoughts for the presidents that certainly could be true but are NOT the kind of thing we can accurately guess about.There s a disturbing richness to the difference between what these men SAID both about liberty generally and often about slavery in particular and their ACTIONS THAT is what you should focus on, not making up inner thought processes that make it all obviously evil It s a common aspect of human nature to live in contradiction, especially when the contradiction supports our way of life Whether we realize the contradiction or not is beside the point, and is not something you can just guess about Read their work See their actions That s history.Further, this book is just not really what the title suggests it is There s still a lot of focus on the presidents and their life histories and the nation s history , delivered hurriedly and generically, especially if you already know about the period I assumed that Davis had done a lot of research and found interesting things about the enslaved people he focused on Andhe didn t I definitely believe he included all that he found, and it is unfortunate that it is so hard to see these lives But the book is still not really about them It s about the presidents Ona Judge is the one person who stands out in the detail given her story.Then there s this whole hidden history angle, and with the exception of a few details for example, Washington s unrelenting attempt to retrieve Ona or Andrew Jackson s horrific newspaper ad there s nothing here that really surprised me or I think is generally unknown to the current generation There s a lot of awareness of the fact that the men who set up our country and talked eloquently about freedom also participated in slavery That s not shocking on its own, but Davis expects it to be.Is this an important thing to talk about Absolutely, yes The reason I kept reading this book despite finding it a poor exploration of the topic is because I wanted to learnabout the history even if the communication was poor.But is this book a good discussion of this topic Ehhh


  8. Brandy Painter Brandy Painter says:

    This is an excellent, engaging book about four presidents and people they enslaved It is a well sourced and documented work of non fiction that explains necessary background details important for the targeted audience.


  9. Laura Laura says:

    Note This book was selected from genre based list, and is being reviewed as part of online course work the review may reference other books from that genre based list which I did not choose to read, or books read for previous weeks This was a very sobering book about the often glossed over history of some of our country s first leaders I opted for the audiobook version because like with It s Kind of a Funny Story , I wasn t sure if I would have the d Note This book was selected from genre based list, and is being reviewed as part of online course work the review may reference other books from that genre based list which I did not choose to read, or books read for previous weeks This was a very sobering book about the often glossed over history of some of our country s first leaders I opted for the audiobook version because like with It s Kind of a Funny Story , I wasn t sure if I would have the drive to finish it I was pleasantly surprised that unlike It s Kind of a Funny Story , this book did not feel like a chore to complete Though the topic is heavy, the writing style makes this book feel very appropriate for junior high students, or perhaps even late elementary schoolers This books gives aaccurate picture of what slavery was like for persons owned by well off Northerners though it frequently mentions the deep south, all personal accounts take place in Northern states colonies than many other texts Two very recent picture books, A Birthday Cake for George Washington 2016 and A Fine Dessert 2015 , stirred up quite a bit of controversy over the accuracy of smiling slaves in what could be a child s first introduction to the topic But it s not just children s books which attempt to sugar coat slavery, also in 2015 it was discovered that a McGraw Hill World Geography textbook being used in Texas classrooms included a caption on a Patterns of Immigration map which referred to slaves as millions of workers from Africa In the Shadow of Liberty gives some of the most authentic accounts enslavement I have read yet, and clearly it s a literary topic in desperate need of such authentic accounts On the audiobook, I have to note that I really enjoyed that there were several narrators, eight including the author, which made the stories of each of the five featured enslaved African Americans feelpersonal, and easier to separate from one another


  10. Ann Smorado Ann Smorado says:

    I thought this was a very good read The history was interesting He provided enough detail without getting bogged down in details He gave us a good look at the early presidents and their stories with the enslaved people who worked closest to them We tend to glorify these men because they are American heroes they still are and, here, we see the contradiction in which they lived He gave us that look without totally tearing them down either Very balanced I thought Ona Judge s story was the I thought this was a very good read The history was interesting He provided enough detail without getting bogged down in details He gave us a good look at the early presidents and their stories with the enslaved people who worked closest to them We tend to glorify these men because they are American heroes they still are and, here, we see the contradiction in which they lived He gave us that look without totally tearing them down either Very balanced I thought Ona Judge s story was the most interesting She walked away from according to the book was a relatively good life for an African American woman in that time to live and grow old very poor BUT she had the one thing she wantedthan anything and that was FREEDOM She spoke volumes with her story


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