The Bull and the Spear eBook É and the PDF ↠


The Bull and the Spear ❮Read❯ ➭ The Bull and the Spear Author Michael Moorcock – Thomashillier.co.uk Fantastic, Moorcock makes it work DAILY EXPRESSThe rich dark time of the Sword Rulers is over Prince Corum Jhaelen Irsei, Prince of the Scarlet Robe, sits alone, mourning his mortal wife, Rhalina Stra Fantastic, Moorcock makes it and the PDF ↠ work DAILY EXPRESSThe rich dark time of the Sword Rulers is over Prince Corum Jhaelen Irsei, Prince of the Scarlet Robe, sits alone, mourning his mortal wife, Rhalina Strange voices haunt his dreams, craving his help In The Bull PDF \ answer to their prayers, e travels the Planes to where Rhalina s descendants face annihilation by the awful gods of the Cold Folk, led by the giant Kerenos and his savage phantom houndsOnly the Black Bull of Crinanass can overcome these icy Bull and the eBook ✓ demons But Corum s quest must take him first to the enchanted isle of Hy Breasail to find the Spear called Bryionak For only with the Spear can Corum master the great Black BullDrawn straight from the natural well of fantasythe stuff of dreams GUARDIANLike TolkienMoorcock has the ability to create a wholly imaginative world landscaped with vivid and sometimes frightening realitya glittering story THE TIMESCover Illustration Rodney Matthews.

    The Bull and the Spear eBook É and the PDF ↠ of dreams GUARDIANLike TolkienMoorcock has the ability to create a wholly imaginative world landscaped with vivid and sometimes frightening realitya glittering story THE TIMESCover Illustration Rodney Matthews."/>
  • Paperback
  • 150 pages
  • The Bull and the Spear
  • Michael Moorcock
  • English
  • 09 November 2019
  • 0583129846

About the Author: Michael Moorcock

Michael John Moorcock is and the PDF ↠ an English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels Moorcock has mentioned The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Apple Cart by George Bernard Shaw and The Bull PDF \ The Constable of St Nicholas by Edward Lester Arnold as the first three books which captured his imagination He became editor of Tarzan Adventures in , at the age of sixteen, and later moved on to edit Sexton Blake Library As editor Bull and the eBook ✓ of the controversial British science fiction magazine New Worlds, from May until March and then again from to , Moorcock fostered the development of the science fiction New Wave in the UK and indirectly in the United States His serialization of Norman Spinrad s Bug Jack Barron was notorious for causing British MPs to condemn in Parliament the Arts Council s funding of the magazineDuring this time, he occasionally wrote under the pseudonym of James Colvin, a house pseudonym used by other critics on New Worlds A spoof obituary of Colvin appeared in New Worlds January , written by William Barclay another Moorcock pseudonym Moorcock, indeed, makes much use of the initials JC , and not entirely coincidentally these are also the initials of Jesus Christ, the subject of his Nebula award winning novella Behold the Man, which tells the story of Karl Glogauer, a time traveller who takes on the role of Christ They are also the initials of various Eternal Champion Moorcock characters such as Jerry Cornelius, Jerry Cornell and Jherek Carnelian Inrecent years, Moorcock has taken to using Warwick Colvin, Jr as yet another pseudonym, particularly in his Second Ether fiction.



10 thoughts on “The Bull and the Spear

  1. Mark Lawrence Mark Lawrence says:

    This book was published in 1973, my copy dates from 1976, and I acquired it from a second hand book shop in 1979.This is a slim book that makes my own relatively short debut seem positively bulky I estimate it at 50 60,000 words, and given that Moorcock could write 15,000 words in a day, I can well believe his claim to have written many of these eternal champion books in a couple of weeks.The Corum books, along with Elric Hawkmoon, are highlights of my early fantasy reading and I ve avoided r This book was published in 1973, my copy dates from 1976, and I acquired it from a second hand book shop in 1979.This is a slim book that makes my own relatively short debut seem positively bulky I estimate it at 50 60,000 words, and given that Moorcock could write 15,000 words in a day, I can well believe his claim to have written many of these eternal champion books in a couple of weeks.The Corum books, along with Elric Hawkmoon, are highlights of my early fantasy reading and I ve avoided returning to them for 30 years partly because I was afraid they wouldn t live up to those early memories.I failed to bring any of my current reads with me to this stay at the hospice and so I started this one again I picked it up last night and finished this morning It s the first book of the second trilogy, with an 80 year gap and change of worlds between them, so it s pretty much a new trilogy for all that it s called 4.And so, the verdict It s a mixed bag Very obviously Moorcock can write It s clear in many of the lines that he has a great way with words He has focused prose with a poet s touches For example a grey wind of course the wind wasn t grey, but in context you know exactly what this means and it paints the picture with great economy I suspect my own style owes a lot to early readings of Moorcock s work.The Bull and The Spear trilogy echo a lot of celtic mythology and are written with a mythic feel to them, that strengthens rapidly toward the end of the book For example, spoiler the bull runs across the land and renews it with its blood, where the blood falls the Fhoi Myore s winter is reversed Now this is the sort of thing that s written in Norse sagas or celtic legend If you think about the mechanics of how long it would take to run _everywhere_ and how much blood it would take etc it all sounds a bit silly But the mythic style supports it, though ramping up uncomfortably quickly The bull s activity contrasting to the start where there s considerable realism with Corum fighting competently but subject to all the limitations of a normal man and running out of steam quickly in any prolonged combat.The book is short and somewhat crowded, especially toward the end where characters like Hew Argtec and Prince Gaynor are thrown very briefly into the mix.The relationships such as they are are fairly unconvincing and supported by minimal and fairly wooden dialogue Corum s affair with the king s daughter being the prime example However, the imagination and feel and swiftness of the book all carry you through it and at the end it left me not regretting my decision to re read, but with this icon of my youth very definitely shrunk to human dimensions I ll give this book 4 and one of those is for old time s sake Join my 3 emails a year newsletter prizes

  2. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    The second Corum trilogy begins with our aging one eyed, one handed hero being summoned into a future world which looks a lot like ancient Ireland to battle seven powerful interlopers from another plane Echoes of old Gaelic mythology abound, and as usual the writing is brisk, the tone is brooding, and the world view pessimistic and complex.

  3. Bookwraiths Bookwraiths says:

    Loved everything about this story The continuation of Corum s saga is well thought out, consistent, and fitting Moorcock doing a wonderful job setting up our champion s emotional state at the beginning of the tale the seamlessly inserting him into a new environment with shadowy villains, who are evencompelling than the Chaos Lords from the first trilogy Definitely, the book is quite short, yet it is powerful, has its far share of philosophical interludes and is just damn entertaining T Loved everything about this story The continuation of Corum s saga is well thought out, consistent, and fitting Moorcock doing a wonderful job setting up our champion s emotional state at the beginning of the tale the seamlessly inserting him into a new environment with shadowy villains, who are evencompelling than the Chaos Lords from the first trilogy Definitely, the book is quite short, yet it is powerful, has its far share of philosophical interludes and is just damn entertaining This novel proving to still be one of the best sword and sorcery stories out there

  4. Tony Tony says:

    Much as I love Moorcock, this does seem a little like the tale has been stretched rather thin A little transparent Good, butof the same when the opportunity existed to develop the character further than this.

  5. Craig Craig says:

    The Bull and the Spear is the fourth book in the Corum series and the first book in the second trilogy The news of a second trilogy came as a surprise to readers of the first three volumes because The King of the Swords, the concluding book of the trilogy, ended with This ends the third and final Book of Corum The second trilogy is a bit darker and feels a bit rushed in comparison with the first The plots are fairly similar in structure and theme, and don t really cover any ground that the The Bull and the Spear is the fourth book in the Corum series and the first book in the second trilogy The news of a second trilogy came as a surprise to readers of the first three volumes because The King of the Swords, the concluding book of the trilogy, ended with This ends the third and final Book of Corum The second trilogy is a bit darker and feels a bit rushed in comparison with the first The plots are fairly similar in structure and theme, and don t really cover any ground that the first ones didn t It sfirmly grounded in familiar aspects of mythologies such as Norse and particularly Irish Corum Jhaelen Irsei, the Prince in the Scarlet Robe, is an integral aspect of The Eternal Champion in Moorcock s multiverse tapestry of conflict featuring the Balance and Law and Chaos The books are quite entertaining and fast, fun reads for heroic fantasy fans, but I wouldn t rank this second set as crucial parts of the puzzle I preferred the conclusion to The Rulers trilogy to the one reached here

  6. Kostas Kostas says:

    6 10 The Bull and the Spear continues with the second chronicles of Corum, but his adventures, yet again, are only just beginninig as he will have to travel through a, much, changed world in a quest for the magical Spear.The story picks up a few decades after The King of the Swords with Corum starting his new adventures, but this time it didn t hold me as much as the previous books in the series It felt a lot like Moorcock was telling the same and same things again, only with a different ene 6 10 The Bull and the Spear continues with the second chronicles of Corum, but his adventures, yet again, are only just beginninig as he will have to travel through a, much, changed world in a quest for the magical Spear.The story picks up a few decades after The King of the Swords with Corum starting his new adventures, but this time it didn t hold me as much as the previous books in the series It felt a lot like Moorcock was telling the same and same things again, only with a different enemy and it somewhat left me with mixed feelings in the end.Also, while I could put aside most of Moorcock s flaws in the previous books, in this book his writing has, perhaps, a bitsilliness than the others and that was one of the things that bothered me, even though the story passes quite quickly.Overall, I wouldn t say it was a bad book, as the previous books had some stuff too, but it is definitely my least favorite so far

  7. Kate Sherrod Kate Sherrod says:

    It s official I like Corum best of all the Eternal Champions It s fascinating how he s shed so many of the accoutrements of his identity as he s gone along I miss Jhary Whiskers though It s official I like Corum best of all the Eternal Champions It s fascinating how he s shed so many of the accoutrements of his identity as he s gone along I miss Jhary Whiskers though

  8. Andy Wixon Andy Wixon says:

    I read an interview with Michael Moorcock where he revealed the secrets of his art deciding that as he could write 15,000 words a day, it would be lazy not to, he set that as a target and proceeded to knock out two new books a week.For me, this explains the prolific nature of Moorcock s fantasy output, but also something of its tone the vague sense that the author is on some sort of autopilot perhaps in a creative trance would be aflattering way of putting it and the odd insubstantiali I read an interview with Michael Moorcock where he revealed the secrets of his art deciding that as he could write 15,000 words a day, it would be lazy not to, he set that as a target and proceeded to knock out two new books a week.For me, this explains the prolific nature of Moorcock s fantasy output, but also something of its tone the vague sense that the author is on some sort of autopilot perhaps in a creative trance would be aflattering way of putting it and the odd insubstantiality of most of the books All the Corums, the Hawkmoons, and so on start blurring together quite quickly the same even happens to some extent to the Elric stories, the Erekose books and the Jerry Cornelius novels.I hasten to say that if Moorcock s fantasies are hackwork they are hackwork of the highest quality, always well written, occasionally thought provoking, and filled with at least superficially distinctive imagery and twists.The Bull and the Spear kicks off the second Corum trilogy knowledge of the first is not really required and to some extent it stands on its own as a novel It sCeltic inflected than most of Michael Moorcock s work, with various elements of Celtic mythology reworked to suit the story it turns out Corum is vaguely recalled as the God Crom Cruach, the antagonists of the story are sea demons called the Fhoi Myore Fomor , and so on.It s effortlessly readable with a strong atmosphere and an impressive sense of all pervading doom, and to me was slightlyengaging than the other Corum stories I ve read But, like most Michael Moorcock books from this period, how you react to it may depend on your attitude to the man if you ve already got half a dozen orMoorcock novels under your belt this will be another one to add to the tally, standing up on its own merits but perhaps as importantly adding just a little to your knowledge of the Moorcockian multiverse If this is your first exposure, on the other hand, you could be forgiven for wondering exactly what all the fuss is about stripped of its wider context, this is a very competent and slightly unusual old fashioned heroic fantasy, nothingor less

  9. Fredrick Danysh Fredrick Danysh says:

    Corun has greatly out lived his human mate, Rhalina He uses his powers as a god to travel though time to aid the descendants of Rhalina who are being persecuted by giant gods The Black Bull has the powers necessary has the powers to defeat monsters but a epic journey is required to harness those powers.

  10. David A. David A. says:

    This was my favorite so far of the Corum books, partly because it s so thoroughly grounded in Irish mythology, and partly because structurally it felt a littleunified, a little less of a whatever came to mind at the moment pastiche than some of the previous books Moorcock did emo before emo was emo, before emo was cool, and he does it well by keeping it under control an undertone of hopelessness, a hero who s resigned to the callousness of fate and at some points wants literally to jus This was my favorite so far of the Corum books, partly because it s so thoroughly grounded in Irish mythology, and partly because structurally it felt a littleunified, a little less of a whatever came to mind at the moment pastiche than some of the previous books Moorcock did emo before emo was emo, before emo was cool, and he does it well by keeping it under control an undertone of hopelessness, a hero who s resigned to the callousness of fate and at some points wants literally to just lie down and die, but still goes on to fight the fight, not even necessarily because it s the right thing to do, but because that s just what he does The Black Bull here, though its part is limited, is one of my favorite characters in the entire series pure awesomeness.I still confess myself to beTeam Elric than Team Corum, though the sea maze, dragon riding, and black sword with its own evil agenda, all in the possession of a tortured albino, are pretty much an impossible combination to beat It s a good effort, so far, though, Corum Keep at it, and I ll stick it out with you for a couplebooks and see how you measure up

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