10 thoughts on “Edward VI: The Lost King of England

  1. says:

    The boy king Edward VI was a Tudor King and yet due to his short reign, was overshadowed by the other Tudor monarchs In every history book you will read, they briefly graze upon Edward and his over bearing concillors Edward Seymour and John Dudley Yet, those threads and facts are merely presented to demonstrate how they effected upon the lives of Mary and Elizabeth Skid delightfully presents an ENTIRE book dedicated to the young boy who changed England forever by pushing Protestantism and also changing Henry VIII s will by creating his own Device to the Sucession and implementing Jane Grey s mother and ultimately Jane Skid provides an open look into how controlled poor Edward...


  2. says:

    Edward VI is little known most people, if they remember him, would recall him being the boy king who preceded his charismatic and dynamic sisters And yet, this boy king reigned for 9 years, upon which there was a general shift in religious attitudes towards a rigid Protestantism, away from the pseudo Protestantism his father championed and the Catholic Church of old I picked up this book out of genuine curiosity Edward, like previously remarked, is generally given a few mentions before historians and writers move on to Mary and Elizabeth Dare I suggest there may be interest towards Jane than Edward There s a lot to learn about the boy, and this book promised an introduction to the mysterious King Skid did an excellent job in introducing and emphasizing the intricacies of the court during Edward s reign Being a minor, the King relied on his court to guide him, and any Tudorphile is aware of the deception, trickery and Machiavellian tactics that permeated the royal retinue Perhaps a slight downside, but I expected there to be of a focus on Edward himself rather, a substantial part of the book was dedicated to developing characters such as Somerset and Northumberland Understandable, but slightly disappointing A slight detour the diary passages used by Skid were brilliant, and they allowed a greater underst...


  3. says:

    You don t hear a lot about Edward VI The poor boy didn t rule very long and he was sandwiched between his father, the overbearing, gouty pig Henry VIII and his sisters, the overbearing gouty pig Mary I and the desperately insecure and petty yet brilliant feminist icon, Elizabeth I I found this to be a very interesting foray into his brief life and even briefer rule His relationship with his Seymour uncles ended in at least one death, I believe , his rigid Protestant beliefs and the political machinations behind his need to keep a Protestant on the throne are all discussed in depth When he realized he was going to die, he skipped over his sisters Mary was an avowed Catholic just as rigid as he was and Elizabeth was shrewdly refusing to take sides and sealed poor Jane Grey s Nine days queen fate And it all failed anyway, leading to Bloody Mary s rei...


  4. says:

    This is an interesting and very readable book covering a little known king in English history Although Edward VI died young and never truly reigned in his own right there is enough political in fighting, rebellions and source material about the boy king himself to tell a fascinating story.In fact because this history is so limited in it s scope due to Edward s early death it provides a good opportunity for us to have an insight into how a king is educated and prepared for his future role rather than most histories which deal predominantly with adult monarchs.It is true that the book spends as much time covering the two main political actors of the period Somerset and Northumberland as it does Edward himself, however I think this is both necessary and unavoidable in order to understand events of the period.As other reviews have mentioned, perhaps one failing of the book is that it doesn t ask the question of how influential Edward s short rei...


  5. says:

    This was a little bit of a drag for me in the middle The beginning close to Henry VIII s reign and the end the start of Mary s rule were easier to follow Between, when everyone is scheming for power while Edward VI is a minor, were a little hard to follow It s difficult to keep track of who s who when they have a name and also a title and the two seem to be used interchangeably, with titles sometimes changing as well But Skid seems to be very thorough, incorporating tons of primary sou...


  6. says:

    Skid suffers of clumsy writing occasionally I struggled with three or four stars as the material is good, the delivery lacks a bit Some silly mistakes in wording that even an amateur like me picked off but a good add...


  7. says:

    Chris Skid makes courageous choices addressing topics challenging due to limited popular appeal his later book, Death And The Virgin, I thoroughly enjoyed Edward VI s reign we see through the prism of important religious development than being drawn to the boy king s persona That s understandable, this being a short reign.The obvious question is why this short reign is so eclipsed by Bloody Mary I s even shorter one immediately following it Answer Mary was the first queen regnant, a mature and tormented woman with a dramatic personal history, a Catholic zealot who burnt heretics for better or worse, a colourful character to grasp.Edward might have become a fascinating figure, but his meagre measure of life allowed little opportunity for noteworthy character building Formidably well educated, he was also the first English monarch raised a Protestant Intensely conscious of his status as God s anointed, he was pompous for his years, even castigating his much older intransigent half sister Mary for flaunting her staunch Catholicism He conversely favoured his other half sister Elizabeth, Mary s junior, who soundly rejected Catholicism.He was similarly fond of his widowed stepmother Queen Catherine Parr, herself a keener reformist than her husband Henry VIII had been and who, in her early widowhood, married Edward s uncle Thomas Seymour, scheming brother of Lord Protector So...


  8. says:

    3.5Like most books that focus on a historical figure that has very little written about them see Edward s mother, for instance it can be lacking in rich detail and tends to focus on people around the person the biography is about And, like most books, this falls into that trap for about half the book Since Edward was so young when he took the throne, it wasn t him who was in charge, it were those around it.That s my main complaint about this book It focused a lot on Northumberland, Somerset, and the Lord Admiral Respectively John Dudley, Edward Seymour, and Thomas Seymour I ll use their titles mostly since that s typically how they re referenced throughout the book It s understandable with all the coups and factions that arose as in Henry VI s time as the last child king of England that they would focus there for the bulk of Edward s reign Still, it got a bit annoying when there was a full chapter on the Lord Admiral s thing with Elizabeth, when it didn t even give Edward s reaction to it Or, the last chapter I could have done without a whole chapter about Mary rising up and fighting Jane s rule.However, about 50 60% through the book, Edward was old enough to start making decisions for himself And, it showed I loved how much his diary was used throughout that section as a primary resource It wanted of it I wanted of Edward By the end, Skid had convinced me about how important Edward VI was to the English Reformation If he had lived, what would have happened Tha...


  9. says:

    Believe it or not, this is the first book I have read that focuses solely on Edward VI, the longed for male heir of Henry VIII and younger half brother to Mary I and Elizabeth I I found the book informative but it still raised long asked questions about Edward s reign How in control was he during his reign Was he just the Duke of Somerset s AKA the Lord Protector AKA Edward Seymour, Edward s uncle puppet and then later, the Duke of Northumberland s John Dudley Author Chris Skid raises these questions and provides plenty of contemporary evidence of Edward s role in the administration of his Court I think Skid does a fine job of gathering evidence and presenting it clearly in an engaging way throughout the book Through Skid s words, the reader learns that Edward was a prodigy of sorts, readily learning languages and theology, as well as taking great interest in the government of his country as he grew older and what child would not, who has such power at his fingertips and who is eager to wield it There are conflicting contemporary accounts of Edward s reign throughout the book which of course, is no fault of the author s Naturally, those clinging to the Catholic faith and those close to Mary, such as the Imperial Ambass...


  10. says:

    The only son of Henry VIII, Edward VI was a boy king who didn t reign long enough to live up to his full potential Upon his ascension to the throne, Edward s monarchy was initially the Seymour show His Uncle Edward Seymour, having acquired the role of Lord Protector, was basically ruling the country by proxy Thomas Seymour, jealous of his brother s power, attempted to kidnap Edward, which resulted in his beheading I can t imagine a boy sentencing his own uncle to death, but Thomas did kill Edward s dog in the failed coup That wouldn t be the first of his Seymour uncles to lose his head eventually the elder Seymour would end up on the scaffold John Dudley was then next in line to dominate Edward s minority With so many ambitions men jockeying for power during Edward s minority, it s a wonder England di...


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