[EPUB] ✰ Les Centurions By Jean Lartéguy – Thomashillier.co.uk

Les Centurions This Is Jean Larteguy S Most Famous Book That Garnered International Acclaim And Sold Millions Of Copies It Was Also The Basis For The Movie, The Lost Command, Starring Anthony Quinn In His Autobiography, Larteguy Writes That He Got The Name Of The Book From When He Was Traveling With The Foreign Legion In The Sahara And Came Across An Old Roman Column At An Oasis Inscribed On The Column From 2000 Years Before Was Titus Caius Germanicus, Centurion Of The Xth Legion And Underneath It From A Recent Time, Friedrich Germanicus, Of The 1st R.E.P French Paratroop Regiment The Story Begins In May 1954 With The Defeat Of The French Army At Dien Bien Phu The Vietnamese Victors March Their French Prisoners Into Communist Re Education Camps During Their Time In Captivity, The French Paratroop Officers Who Survive The Ordeal To Be Repatriated, Bond Together And Try To Utilize Communist Revolutionary War Tactics In Order To Win Their Next War In Algeria The Book Ends With The French Centurions Fighting The Battle Of Algiers With Propaganda, Torture, Terror And Any Tactic In Order To Win So That The Last Remnants Of Their Empire Could Survive.


10 thoughts on “Les Centurions

  1. says:

    How many times has the story recounted in this classic novel about war been writ in the history of mankind Ask our soldiers to find a way to save the nation and they do, only to be blamed for their actions in the end The thing about violence is that it destroys the actor and the acted upon There is no safe place.Penguin Classics has just reissued this title with a Foreword by Robert D Kaplan, revised from a 2007 article in The Atlantic called Rereading Vietnam In his Foreword, Kaplan brings Lart guy s work up to date, relating it to Iraq Inextreme and difficult situations like Iraq, cynics may actually serve a purpose Lart guy immortalizes such soldiers The longest and most lavishly described section of the novel focuses on Vietnam and a group of paratroopers imprisoned there We learn what makes up their natures just as they do, undergoing the hardships, failed escape attempts, sickness, and final release back to France We chart their crisscrossing and overlapping lives as they try to put themselves back together on home soil and lament with them the changes to their c...


  2. says:

    Engaging and psychologically tense depiction of French soldiers, centurions, from the prison camps after Dien Bien Phu to the guerrilla wars of Algeria One reason this book is so interesting is because of its attention from the contemporary American military because of the similarity of the struggles Vietnam still looms large, of course, but also the bonds between combat troops, the separation of a warrior culture from civilians, and the long grinding struggle of military occupation, which to them demands exemptions from the law view spoiler The climax of the book is the ticking time bomb scenario for the use of torture would you torture a person if they re the only one who has information about bombs set to go off that is, out of expediency In 24 and the legal opinions of the late Antonin Scalia, torture is used immediate...


  3. says:

    According to Wikipedia The Centurions was one of the most popular novels in France in the 1960s, and its author partly responsible for a revival of novel reading in France where, at the time 38% of adults had never read a book I d never heard of it, until prompted by Thomas Powers 2013 essay on Warrior Petraeus in The New York Review of Books, I tried to find a used copy and found the few copies available priced in the low hundreds So I was very happy to see Penguin reissue the book in its original translation by Xan Fielding, an author and soldier as colorful as Lart guy himself.I ll limit my review to a few comments because I don t want to spoil the story itself And if you don t want to know anything, stop here Focused on a small group of French paratroopers, the tale unfolds in three acts the first in Vietnam after the fall of Dien Bien Phu when the soldiers are prisoners of the Vi t Minh the second set back in France where they endure the corruption and incomprehension of the civilization they were fighting for and the third in Algeria during the Suez Crisis and the Battle of Algie...


  4. says:

    I do not recommend books very often Having read all my life I am difficult to please As an author, I am also a harsh critic, however this book demands that it is recommended to readers.The writing, its style, the content and psychological explanations of character are excellent.T...


  5. says:

    A complex and cerebral book.It can be viewed as a thinly disguised polemic on counterinsurgency, an anti communist screed, or the wine of sour grapes by an Imperialist bitterly lamenting the loss of his possessions.And there s sex Lots and lots of sex In fact, it seems that part of Larteguy s anger over the loss of Indochina and Algeria is a lament for the loss of exotic fleshpots Larteguy voices several times over the moral superiority of France, as evinced in how its men allow the women of their colonial possessions to be sexually liberated, compared to their oppressive countrymen All the while, continuing to sexually objectify them Apparently the freedoms inherent in Sexual Egalitarianism do not include Feminism But, it was a different time I suppose Regardless of those social s, this is a book about changing the mindset of conventional warriors, and the eternal isolation of the combatant from the civilians he protects Indeed, most of the book justifies the insularity of the military from its country, and beyond that the insularity of elite units from the conventional military An interesting build up to the next installment , The Praetorians, which I m dying to read Larteguy skewers civilians in France, and the Pied Noirs in Algeria He skewers intellectuals and the bloated cowards in the military that are not of the paratrooper community.It s an angry boo...


  6. says:

    This is a book about soldiers, but not so much about war It s a treatise on class, race, communism and colonialism as told through the experience of French paratroopers in Indochina and Algeria Female readers may object some because many the female characters are judged as lusty, unfaithful, or both while the same characteristics in the men is portrayed as simply understandable While the book is a little disjointed in the telling, and the characters at times hard to sort out, it is worth...


  7. says:

    An excellent book which gives a good understanding of the French military mindset during the First Vietnam War I recommend it to my students at Glasgow University as a must read for American History Vietnam studies.I read this book as a young Parachute Regiment officer and have remem...


  8. says:

    This book was ONE of the main books that inspired me to join the Marine Corps and helped me so much in Vietnam I have this book in my library, and consider it a treasure.


  9. says:

    If anyone in the Johnson or Bush administrations had ever read The Centurions by Jean Lart guy, they might never have ventured into Southeast Asia or the Middle East In both cases, France went there first and failed first, before the United States did The intro to the Penguin edition of The Centurions lets us know that by now, you ll find copies of this superb novel on the desks of many prominent soldiers, including Generals David Petraeus and Stanley McChrystal, who showed such competence whatever else happened to them later in their superintendence of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, respectively The Centurions is the middle book of Lart guy s masterful trilogy about the French struggle to keep Vietnam and Algeria in the empire That struggle is doomed and the soldiers know it, whether they let themselves realize it or not Larteguy is a reporter, soldier, and writer who knows his material, knows war, knows history, and cares about people and the meanings of their actions We see some unforgettable characters Captain Philippe Esclavier, brilliant, world weary, and first to see that this is a new kind of war, spearheaded by a new brand of nationalist fervor expressed in guerrilla and terror tactics Colonel Raspeguy, a Basque soldier with a flair fo...


  10. says:

    So this is the book that got Frenchmen reading again Telling A notorious read, if there ever was one Well known for being on the short list of David Petraeus favorite books, as well as providing literary justification for torture, rape and murder by military forces in order to combat against the western world s new enemies In broad strokes, the story surrounds the educational process a group of French officers undergo while held prisoner by communists in Vietnam There they learn that conventional warfare is insufficient for dealing with the new, superior soldier who has jettisoned emotions, traditions and moral conventions Once released, these officers take what they have learned and practice their newly learned lessons in Algeria Through disregard of civilian rights, application of merciless torture, and the occasional rape which transforms victim into lover, these French officers save the day, prevent a series of terrorist bombings, and dismantle an entire nationalist network This book is known for its message that the successful armies of the future will have to conduct battles through surgical strikes, using ideology when available, but always emphasizing focused ruthlessness in achieving the goal of victory Peace is given little thought in this work as being false or repugnant Good dialogue seems to suffer the same fate I do not know if this...