Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a


10 thoughts on “Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner

  1. Miranda Reads Miranda Reads says:

    Not for the faint of heartWhile I was on my people who work with dead bodies kick Stiff, Good Mourning , I stumbled upon this gem This book wasn t as research heavy as Stiff nor was it as focused as Good Mourning but I certainly enjoyed listening it This one was able to give a fascinating medical examiner s perspective on the deceased.As described in the title, this book covers the bodies Judy Melinek tacked throughout her residency in a New York morgue She starts with the natural causes Not for the faint of heartWhile I was on my people who work with dead bodies kick Stiff, Good Mourning , I stumbled upon this gem This book wasn t as research heavy as Stiff nor was it as focused as Good Mourning but I certainly enjoyed listening it This one was able to give a fascinating medical examiner s perspective on the deceased.As described in the title, this book covers the bodies Judy Melinek tacked throughout her residency in a New York morgue She starts with the natural causes, meanders through a few murders and a couple of heart wrenching cases All the while she keeps an upbeat tone Gallows humor, if you will But, about halfway through the book, all trace of that lightness disappears.9 11 happens and Judy Melinek is in the city With no one else to turn to, she and the rest of the morgue team has the nearly unimaginable task of processing the twin towers bodies She was completely overwhelmed and distraught and yet manages to hold her own despite the mountains of bodies in freezers for her to categorize and identify I felt overwhelmed just reading this I hadn t read the back of the book before reading this, so I was completely blindsided by the 9 11 tie in This is certainly a riveting read though you may want to read it on an empty stomach if you are squeamish.YouTube Blog Instagram Twitter Snapchat miranda.reads Happy Reading


  2. j e w e l s j e w e l s says:

    FIVE STARS Dear Fiction Writers,If you are looking for story ideas, read this non fiction book It s chock full of interesting deaths and fascinating details on the science of the human body.I was gripped from the first page as Dr Melinek begins her journey of training to be a medical examiner in New York City, 2001 She obviously found time who knows how to record in her daily journal for two years Little did she realize she was about to play a crucial part as one of the investigators in FIVE STARS Dear Fiction Writers,If you are looking for story ideas, read this non fiction book It s chock full of interesting deaths and fascinating details on the science of the human body.I was gripped from the first page as Dr Melinek begins her journey of training to be a medical examiner in New York City, 2001 She obviously found time who knows how to record in her daily journal for two years Little did she realize she was about to play a crucial part as one of the investigators in America s greatest human tragedy As a new trainee, she was thrown into 9 11 to sift through semi truck trailers full of body parts, jet fuel and ash She relates this horrific experience with humbleness and gratitude for the first responders It is a sobering, deeply touching account for the reader The 9 11 section is basically only one chapter of this terrific book Mostly, the author relays the various stupid things humans do to themselves and each other that cause death She has strong opinions against suicide her own father hung himself when she was 13 and I found her candor on the subject profound and endearing She never comes across as preachy.If you have the stomach for forensic science, I think you will love this book as much as I did Truly one of the most compelling books I ve read in awhile


  3. Matt Matt says:

    While the world of medicine is likely beyond the comprehension of many, there is always an interest in some of thebizarre cases that make their way onto the public s radar These types of medical situations are anomalies, according to Dr Judy Melinek, MD and TJ Mitchell, citing that the vast majority of medical cases are not worthy of a script on prime time television After leaving her surgical residency, Melinek leapt at the chance to enrol in one focussed on pathology, with significant While the world of medicine is likely beyond the comprehension of many, there is always an interest in some of thebizarre cases that make their way onto the public s radar These types of medical situations are anomalies, according to Dr Judy Melinek, MD and TJ Mitchell, citing that the vast majority of medical cases are not worthy of a script on prime time television After leaving her surgical residency, Melinek leapt at the chance to enrol in one focussed on pathology, with significant interest in the forensic arm of the field This led to a two year fellowship in the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New York, where Melinek was able to see some of her most exciting and interesting cases, described throughout the book While many think of a medical examiner as being one who deals in homicides, Melinek explains that there are many types of life ending situations that ended up before her Some were quite serious, including the man who leapt five storeys to his death and fractured numerous bones, while others were overly comical, like the man who died from complications with his metal penile implant Not only does the job require an examination of the body to determine the matter of death, but can be quite contentious if the family disagrees or the matter makes its way to court Melinek explains that her job can be quite stressful, especially as the body is not always forthcoming with evidence of what has happened and witnesses can inject their own bias surrounding the events leading to the end of life Melinek may have a humours side, but her work also subjects her to numerous cases of horrible death or suffering, not the least of which was the fallout of the September 11, 2001 disaster, where she and her team alongside many others were tasked with identifying remains and trying to bring closure for many Full of oddities that many readers will likely feel must be real as this stuff could never be made up the book will education as well as entertain the curious reader Perfect for those who have an affinity for all things medical and enjoy some of the funnier predicaments in which people can find themselves at the point of death A lighter read for those who want to absorb rather than construct strong opinions Melinek and Mitchell have created an interesting piece here, serving to dispel the myths of television dramatization of the former s job as well as presenting some of theinteresting parts of work as a medical examiner The authors do a masterful job of explaining the medical nuances of the work and injecting a less than intensely serious aspect, which can sometimes help to make the vignettesalluring At no time should the reader feel that the profession is anything but serious, though there are so many interesting files that must cross the desk of a medical examiner that they are forced to find some of the lighter sides to get through the day I can only suspect that many of the names and some facts have been fudged, as the authors freely offer names and situations to help the reader feel as though they are in the middle of the situation at hand Told in a straightforward manner with some medical jargon which is fully explained , the reader is given a decent dose of the profession without drowning in the minutiae Melinek and Mitchell divide the book s chapter s up to discuss a specific theme and choose a central case, whose narrative builds throughout, as well as some minor side vignettes to exemplify some of the arguments being presented This not only allows the reader to have a better handle on the topic, but see it from multiple perspectives As I am a big fan of forensic medicine, this book was right up my alley and served as a wonderful way to sit back and relax after some high intensity reading of late.Kudos, Dr Melinek and Mr Mitchell, for this wonderful piece, that served the purpose I needed I will keep my eyes open for anything else you may write, though will steer clear of any medical journals, even though some of the findings would surely be eye opening Love hate the review An ever growing collection of others appears at Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge


  4. Barbara Barbara says:

    4.5 starsThe work of a medical examiner ME is endlessly fascinating to the public, as evidenced by the many TV shows that feature forensic pathologists like Quincy Law and Order CSI NCIS Rizzoli and Isles Hawaii Five O and others In fiction, pathologists often resolve their cases quickly making lightning fast determinations, intuiting what happened, and often nabbing the culprit themselves.This is very different from real life, where toxicology and DNA tests take months to process, 4.5 starsThe work of a medical examiner ME is endlessly fascinating to the public, as evidenced by the many TV shows that feature forensic pathologists like Quincy Law and Order CSI NCIS Rizzoli and Isles Hawaii Five O and others In fiction, pathologists often resolve their cases quickly making lightning fast determinations, intuiting what happened, and often nabbing the culprit themselves.This is very different from real life, where toxicology and DNA tests take months to process, coroners findings are relayed to police detectives, and the cops hopefully nab the perp Moreover, in reality, most deaths are due to natural causes, disease, accidents, undetected anatomical defects, mental illness, and so on and no crimes are involved.In this enlightening and entertaining book, Dr Judy Melinek describes her two years as a forensic pathology fellow at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner OCME in New York, where she honed her chops as an ME Dr Judy MelinekThe ME s job is to determine the cause and manner of death in cases where the deceased dies suddenly, violently, unexpectedly, in suspicious circumstances, etc.When Melinek graduated from UCLA Medical School in 1996, she wanted to be a surgeon The surgical residency was grueling, however, and Melinek feared making a mistake that would kill a patient Thus, Melinek switched her specialty to forensic pathology Melinek s interest in the field may have stemmed, in part, from the suicide of her father at age 38, when she was 13 years old an event she discusses extensively in the book.Melinek, her husband J.T Mitchell the co author of this book , and their baby Daniel settled down in New York in 2001.Dr Judy Melinek and her husband J.T Mitchell There, Melinek began work at the OCME under the tutelage of Dr Charles Hirsch whom she describes as a pipe smoking, avuncular doctor out of a Norman Rockwell painting Dr Charles HirschAmong other things, Hirsch held morning rounds and afternoon rounds, at which the medical examiners presented their findings and discussed what to write on death certificates about the cause and manner of death These determinations were made using a variety of means, such as the autopsy visiting the death scene reviewing medical records speaking to witnesses consulting detectives and so on..all while collecting evidence that might be used in court.When assigned a body to autopsy, the first thing an ME does is examine the person s external characteristics, and make a record of bruises, cuts, scrapes, scars, tattoos, burns, needle marks, and so on The ME then goes on to probe the inside of the body, and these procedures are thoroughly described in the book.Medical examiner noting a body s external characteristicsDuring her two years at the OCME Melinek worked on a wide variety of cases, including victims of the World Trade Center disaster people who contracted anthrax from a bioterrorism scare and bodies from American Airlines Flight 587 which crashed in NYC To provide a feel for Melinek s job, I ll give examples of some of the cases she worked on or observed.Cable GuyA man dubbed Cable Guy smoked crystal meth before walking his dogs, and accidentally locked himself out of his 9th floor apartment Instead of calling a locksmith, Cable Guy tied his dogs to the doorknob, went up to the roof, tied a cable around his chest, and tried to rappel down to his open window one floor down The cable broke and the man fell to his death Melinek s autopsy showed a fractured skull and shattered ribs that cut through the victim s lungs, esophagus, aorta, and pulmonary artery The death was ruled accidental The dogs were fine.Grisly Industrial AccidentAn egg roll factory has a combination shredder mixer that fills a whole room The shredder in a Manhattan plant blew apart while spinning, and sent the central drum and blade flying The blade amputated the arm of one worker, and shrapnel injured two other employees The metal cylinder landed on the upper chest and neck of a fourth worker, who was pinned to the floor and crushed Melinek found that the man s head was uninjured and he was fully conscious until he died of suffocation The unfortunate victim s death was ruled accidental.AlcoholismMelinek performed scores of autopsies on people who died of acute or chronic alcohol intoxication Melinek s last autopsy in New York was on a victim who died of acute AND chronic alcohol poisoning A man s dead body was found on the steps of a church in winter After getting the results of toxicological tests, Melinek determined that the deceased a chronic alcoholic who had lived on the streets for 30 years was fall down drunk when he fell asleep and died of hypothermia The death was ruled an accident.Drug OverdoseDeaths from a drug overdose are fairly common, the typical victim being young and otherwise healthy To fill out the death certificate, Melinek would usually just wait for the toxicology report and write in the cause of death Drug overdose autopsies were usually quick and easy..unless the family of the victim couldn t accept the truth.Robert Ward was a 28 year old white man with a history of alcoholism and drug abuse One day Robert went out with friends, and was later found dead in his apartment His mom, Mrs Ward, didn t want her son autopsied Don t touch my baby An autopsy was required by law, however, and the toxicology report took four months to reach Melinek s office.During that time Mrs Ward called Melinek at least twice a week, insisting Bobby didn t do drugs , and offering other theories for his death These included bad sushi, poisonous beer, misuse of a friend s asthma medication, anthrax, Nyquil, and dust mites.When the toxicology report was finally completed, it showed a lethal concoction of heroin, cocaine, and the sedative diazepam..and Melinek ruled Ward s death an accident However Mrs Ward couldn t let it go, and now insisted that Bobby s death was a homicide, the fault of the dealer who sold him the drugs.The Bucket BugabooA police officer brought the OCME a goop filled bucket that looked like it might contain a dead fetus An ME carefully emptied the pail, which contained a statuette of kissing angels, maraschino cherries, and a couple of two foot long donkey dongs No fetus The consensus was that this was probably a Santeria love potion..not a case for the OCME LOL SuicidesMelinek saw many suicides These cases were fairly easy to diagnose, especially when they required premeditation and planning like suicide by hanging, which causes ligature marks on the neck and purple hands and feet Other suicides during Melinek s tenure at the OCME included people who jumped into the East River, and victims who leapt from the balcony of the Marriott Marquis Hotel in Times Square The hotel jumpers might have expected a smooth fall to the ground, but they generally pinballed and bumped into structures, severing their limbs and scattering their brains all over.Sometimes apparent suicides were actually homicides or accidents, and the ME s final determination depended on investigation of the death scene information provided by families and police detectives a suicide note and so on.Attack on the World Trade CenterOn September 11, 2001 nine weeks after Melinek started work at the OCME two planes collided with the World Trade Center, causing thousands of deaths The bodies of the victims came to the OCME, and Melinek was one of 30 doctors who worked to identify the remains and assemble evidence of mass murder Many of the victims had been smashed to bits, and the MEs had to treat each specimen be it a hand, a toe, a scrap of tissue, etc as if it were an entire body..the goal being to identify the deceased.The bodies and body parts arrived by the truckload, and after DNA was collected, each specimen was assigned to an ME Melinek s first body was a smashed head and torso limbs gone, body missing below the naval which was burned black and smelled of jet fuel The MEs sole task was identification, so each doctor tried to use fingerprints, distinguishing marks, personal possessions whatever they could find to ID the victims This was a daunting task that took eight months, during which ordinary autopsies also had to be done Needless to say, Melinek and her colleagues were overwhelmed.Anthrax ScareThe World Trade Center situation was exacerbated by the anthrax scare, which began a week after 9 11 Someone started sending letters containing anthrax germs to news agencies in New York and Florida, and to politicians in Washington DC Several people died, and the OCME began to get myriad phone calls from frightened citizens Moreover, the OCME s technicians were too scared to assist with autopsies, so Melinek and the other MEs had to work alone or assist each other.Plane CrashAs if 9 11 and the anthrax scare weren t bad enough, New York experienced a major plane wreck in November, 2001 American Airlines Flight 587 crashed soon after taking off from JFK International Airport, killing all 261 souls aboard, as well as five people on the ground Again the victims remains were taken to the OCME, where the mauled, twisted, charred, kerosene contaminated body parts were identified The cause of the crash at first thought to be terrorism was determined to be pilot error.In spite of it all, Melinek enjoyed her job and the trial by fire she endured while working at the OCME During her time there, Melinek performed 262 autopsies, made 13 court appearances, and had another baby After completing her two year fellowship in forensic pathology in 2002, Melinek did a one year fellowship in neuropathology, then took a job in San Jose, California Since then Melinek has performed thousandsautopsies.In summary, Melinek notes that she loves the work, the medicine, and the science she also loves the non medical aspects of the job, including counseling families, collaborating with detectives, and testifying in court Sounds good to me I enjoyed the book, which contains numerous compelling stories about Melinek s and her colleagues work, as well as amusing tidbits about the authors personal lives I d recommend this memoir to everyone interested in forensic pathology.You can follow my reviews at


  5. Greta G Greta G says:

    A long time ago, I had to attend an autopsy for my work, concerning a case of a fatal accident I wasn t glad with it, because the only time I saw a dead person up until then, was some 15 years earlier, when I was twelve It was my nephew, of the same age, who had died in the bathroom after he fell while bathing and broke his neck I still remember it clearly because we my dad and I had to wait in the hospital for about an hour and I was really nervous by the time we could visit him I ran awa A long time ago, I had to attend an autopsy for my work, concerning a case of a fatal accident I wasn t glad with it, because the only time I saw a dead person up until then, was some 15 years earlier, when I was twelve It was my nephew, of the same age, who had died in the bathroom after he fell while bathing and broke his neck I still remember it clearly because we my dad and I had to wait in the hospital for about an hour and I was really nervous by the time we could visit him I ran away in panic from the morgue in the hospital, horrified by the view of my dead nephew They hadn t succeeded in closing his eyes properly, so one eye was closed and the other eye was still open And it seemed like he was looking at me with this one, lifeless eye So I left the room, shocked with this view When I got in the corridor, there was a man whose half face and neck where covered with a horrible birthmark At that particular moment, it scared the hell out of me So that was my first experience with a dead person, and that really gave me a scare I ended up sending a colleague from the office to attend the autopsy, because at the last moment I was too anxious to go myself The only dead persons I saw later in my life were my parents, after they deceased in the hospital I came acrosscases where unnatural death was involved for my work, but reading about those deaths, and even looking at photographs, however horrific, didn t scare me very much because I was able to objectify all this gruesome stuff and omit the worst details Although I m scared to death about death, I m also attracted to it After all, we all have to die It s not a happy thought, for none of us, but we all hope we will die quietly, without pain and anxiety, in our own bed, while we re sleeping Or just drop dead somewhere and die instantly, in a flash Get it over and done with quickly But that s not always the case As a matter of fact, dying can be very traumatic And probably few people know this better than a Medical Examiner Hospital pathologists perform autopsies only on patients who have died of natural causes A Medical Examiner investigates traumatic deaths, but also natural deaths when they are sudden or unexpected, and they perform autopsies in order to identify the cause of death medical reason and the manner of death, which can be natural, an accident, a homicide, a suicide, an overdose, a therapeutic complication, a medical negligence or of undetermined etiology this translates as fuck if I know Judy Melinek, the author of this book, writes about her experiences during her 2 year fellowship as a forensic pathologist at the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner OCME She didn t start off wanting to be a forensic pathologist She wanted to be a surgeon and heal people But she quitted her surgery residency because she wasn t happy with the highly demanding training She ended up loving her work as a pathologist, as she s happy to learn something new about the human body every day But she also loves the non medical aspects of the job the counseling of families, collaborating with detectives, testifying in court She loves her task of performing the last and most thorough physical exam a person will ever have and figuring out what went wrong in the body This love for her work shines through on every page of this book Her book is a dead honest testimony of her work Each body tells a story, she says, and she shares these stories with us, readers There s the miserable story of a man, freezing to death The story of a man rescued from a fire in his home, only to die three hours later The story of a pregnant woman who died after a hit and run car accident The story of a man with an eggshell skull fracture The sudden death of a schizophrenic woman A young man struck by lightning Stories of drug abuse A floater Several homicides Several suicides A case of anthrax poisoning Unsettling stories of the handling of the remains from the 9 11 victims A couple of cases of death as a result of medical or surgical intervention and a case of medical screwup These stories are engagingly told and are sometimes really witty, for instance the case of the cable guy view spoiler This guy had been smoking crystal meth and took his two dogs on a walk When he returned, he found he had locked himself out of his ninth floor apartment Instead of calling a locksmith, he formulated a plan He tied the dogs to the doorknob, went up to the roof, and pried open the television cable distribution box Then he unplugged a coaxial cable and tied it around his chest He then stepped over to the edge of the roof and began to lower himself down, to his open apartment window The coaxial cable broke under his weight, and he fell eight stories and landed on the sidewalk That was a really bad plan hide spoiler sometimes heartbreaking, but always captivating It s a very unique and personal book, and I highly recommend it 8 10


  6. Petra-X Petra-X says:

    I am so enjoying this book The author has this strangely cheery tone She loves her job and the corpses and loves especially discussing really bad wounds and how the people whom she generally addresses by their first names got them Very odd Maybe this is how professional pathologists and other forensic professionals really are and they are just kind of serious and sad in front of us civilians.


  7. Montzalee Wittmann Montzalee Wittmann says:

    Working Stiff Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek, T.J Mitchell, Tanya Eby Narrator is a terrific audio book I picked up from the library Wow I have been a RN all my life and now retired but those faint of heart may not be able to read this It is a bit detailed at what a medical examiner really does for a living and not the TV version I was fascinated and horrified at some of the things that came through, maybe not at the bodies but what people do Working Stiff Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek, T.J Mitchell, Tanya Eby Narrator is a terrific audio book I picked up from the library Wow I have been a RN all my life and now retired but those faint of heart may not be able to read this It is a bit detailed at what a medical examiner really does for a living and not the TV version I was fascinated and horrified at some of the things that came through, maybe not at the bodies but what people do to people or what people will do to get out of work This only covers the time she is at New York but it is during that time that the World Trade Center is hit The tragic and gruesome chapters there were jarring This is a book I am glad I came across None of the details of the work bothered me having seen so much in my life as a nurse but just want to warn those with stomachs weaker than mine to be warned Great book, hope everyone that can read it, will It is the audio version and the narrator was perfect for this book, spot on


  8. Carole Carole says:

    Working Stiff Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek and T.J Mitchell is a fascinating look into the world of a New York City medical examiner Melinek hits the ground running in her new position examining victims of suicide, accidents, homicide and all forms of violent deaths She also visits scenes where the bodies have been found The book is written with a sense of dark humour, but is not offensive or disrespectful of the deceased that find their way to Working Stiff Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek and T.J Mitchell is a fascinating look into the world of a New York City medical examiner Melinek hits the ground running in her new position examining victims of suicide, accidents, homicide and all forms of violent deaths She also visits scenes where the bodies have been found The book is written with a sense of dark humour, but is not offensive or disrespectful of the deceased that find their way to her examining table Major events in NYC are depicted such as 9 11 The book demonstrates that the life of a medical examiner is not as easy or glamorous as we see repeatedly on tv or film It is difficult, painstaking work that most of us can only imagine Though the subject matter is serious, Dr Melinek has written an enthralling account of the work she does Highly recommended


  9. Jim Jim says:

    A very good book that s guaranteed to ruin CSI for you I quit watching years ago She does a great job describing what a busy city morgue is like How she manages to wait for months for paperwork, deals with the crazed public, overworked police,just popped so realistically A rush on a tox screen meant only waiting a week, while a month wasn t unusual She had to balance knowing part of the picture with releasing the body to relatives while accurately assessing the sort of death it A very good book that s guaranteed to ruin CSI for you I quit watching years ago She does a great job describing what a busy city morgue is like How she manages to wait for months for paperwork, deals with the crazed public, overworked police,just popped so realistically A rush on a tox screen meant only waiting a week, while a month wasn t unusual She had to balance knowing part of the picture with releasing the body to relatives while accurately assessing the sort of death it was Far too often, she only knows half the story has to move on Sometimes she comes in on the second half.Her statistics on suicides attempts were interesting IIRC, men manage to kill themselves 3 times as often as women, but women make 3 times as many attempts They re just not very good at it, while guys seem to be good at it even when they don t mean to be Yetproof that the sexes are equal, but certainly not the same.How a death certificate is filled out why was somewhat different than I thought What constitutes accidental death, homicide, medical misadventure was interesting There were far fewer murders than I thought there would be, but some of the stories were pretty horrific She does a good job describing what she could determine what she couldn t Fascinating.Her husband co writer T.J Mitchell must be quite a guy The chapter on her work during 9 11 some of the stories she brought home would have had me hovering like a helicopter I loved the way he supported her.She could certainly cuss like a sailor at times Can t say as I blame her Not a lot of it in the book, but she certainly didn t clean anything up for the squeamish Her descriptions were accurate sometimes quite grotesque Probably not a good book to read during lunch.She dwells a bit too much on her father s suicide While I learned quite a bit the first time she mentioned it, by the end of the book, I was pretty tired of hearing about it.Overall, very well read a good book It didn t seem all that long for all that it covered Highly recommended.20150619 I just had to add a link to a Cracked.com article We Light Your Scrotum On Fire 6 Realities Of The Morgue at your own risk Cracked is generally accurate nasty


  10. Debbie "DJ" Debbie "DJ" says:

    Can I just say OMG I learned a lot about exactly what a forensic pathologist does, and let me just say again, OMG Judy Melinek details every sort of disease and injury possible in a human body Her account of her very worst case almost had me doubled over, but I was also fascinated Hmm, not sure what this says about me I ve got to mention her account of 9 11 as she was one of the pathologists involved in trying to identify all the bodies Her details and descriptions werehorrifying than a Can I just say OMG I learned a lot about exactly what a forensic pathologist does, and let me just say again, OMG Judy Melinek details every sort of disease and injury possible in a human body Her account of her very worst case almost had me doubled over, but I was also fascinated Hmm, not sure what this says about me I ve got to mention her account of 9 11 as she was one of the pathologists involved in trying to identify all the bodies Her details and descriptions werehorrifying than anything I have ever read Definitely not for the faint of heart, but truly captivating


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Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner [Read] ➬ Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner Author Judy Melinek – Thomashillier.co.uk The fearless memoir of a young forensic pathologist s rookie season as a NYC medical examiner, and the cases, hair raising and heartbreaking and impossibly complex, that shaped her as both a physician The fearless memoir of Two Years, PDF/EPUB » a young forensic pathologist s rookie season as a NYC medical examiner, and the cases, hair raising and heartbreaking and impossibly complex, that shaped her as both a physician and a motherJust two months before the Septemberterrorist attacks, Dr Judy Melinek began her training Working Stiff: PDF \ as a New York City forensic pathologist With her husband TJ and their toddler Daniel holding down the home front, Judy threw herself into the fascinating world of death investigation, performing autopsies, investigating death scenes, counseling grieving relatives Working Stiff chronicles Judy s two years of training, taking readers Stiff: Two Years, PDF/EPUB Á behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing deaths in the Big Apple, including a firsthand account of the events of September , the subsequent anthrax bio terrorism attack, and the disastrous crash of American Airlines flight Lively, action packed, and loaded with mordant wit, Working Stiff offers a firsthand account of daily life in one of America s most arduous professions, and the unexpected challenges of shuttling between the domains of the living and the dead The body never lies, and through the murders, accidents, and suicides that land on her table, Dr Melinek lays bare the truth behind the glamorized depictions of autopsy work on shows like CSI and Law and Order to reveal the secret story of the real morgue.

    Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a offers a firsthand account of daily life in one of America s most arduous professions, and the unexpected challenges of shuttling between the domains of the living and the dead The body never lies, and through the murders, accidents, and suicides that land on her table, Dr Melinek lays bare the truth behind the glamorized depictions of autopsy work on shows like CSI and Law and Order to reveal the secret story of the real morgue."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 258 pages
  • Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner
  • Judy Melinek
  • 14 July 2017
  • 1476727252

About the Author: Judy Melinek

Judy Melinek, MD is Two Years, PDF/EPUB » a graduate of Harvard University She trained at UCLA in medicine and pathology, graduating in Her training at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New York is the subject of her memoir, Working Stiff, which she co wrote with her husband, Working Stiff: PDF \ TJ Mitchell Currently, Dr Melinek is CEO of PathologyExpert Inc works as a forensic pathologist in Oakland, California She also travels nationally and internationally to lecture she has been consulted as a forensic expert in many high profile legal cases First Cut will be the debut novel in a Stiff: Two Years, PDF/EPUB Á medical examiner detective fiction series.