A Field Guide to the Familiar: Learning to Observe the

A Field Guide to the Familiar: Learning to Observe the Natural World [Ebook] ➠ A Field Guide to the Familiar: Learning to Observe the Natural World By Gale Lawrence – Thomashillier.co.uk Designed both to encourage beginning naturalists and to challenge experienced observers to look at the familiar in new ways A Field Guide to the Familiar offers an introduction to common plants animal Guide to PDF Î Designed both to encourage beginning naturalists and to challenge experienced observers to look at the familiar in new ways A Field Guide to the Familiar offers an introduction to common plants animals and natural phenomena Beautiful drawings add to the book's refreshing approach to nature study Organized by the seasons of A Field Epub / the year Field Guide to the Familiar: PDF or each chapter focuses on one subject and one learning objective From fall’s first frost to the field crickets of high summer this innovative guide explores in depth such familiar sights as bumblebees rainbows acorns blueberries and shooting stars Each chapter includes descriptive information to help readers identify each subject as Field Guide to eBook ↠ well as life cycle information that shows how a subject functions within a grander scheme Readers learn that every plant and animal – even the atmosphere – has its own story and they begin to perceive the natural world as whole interconnected and continuous Whether read seuentially or used as a field Field Guide to the Familiar: PDF or companion or handy desk reference A Field Guide to the Familiar gives every reader a sense of the natural world as an accessible – and endlessly fascinating – place.


5 thoughts on “A Field Guide to the Familiar: Learning to Observe the Natural World

  1. Andree Sanborn Andree Sanborn says:

    Further explorations for a beginning naturalist and great pages to share with my students We can use one essay a week in season and get to know the topics make new connections and further our curiosity about other things that we see The seasons in this volume are broken into half seasons as I call them like First Frost and Indian Summer Late Fall to Christmas The essays cover things inside our homes Christmas cactus and cluster flies are two essays Each season also covers either a constellation that should be familiar to all of us like Cassiopeia or familiar phenomena like shooting stars This is a wonderful continuation of The Beginning Naturalist Every family should have a copy for their children and every school needs a copy for their students


  2. Oldbluebus Oldbluebus says:

    Entries arranged according to the time of year and what one is most likely to encounter makes the book easy to use Annoying bits of evolutionary content


  3. Erica Erica says:

    Sweet book


  4. Kate Kate says:

    If Mother Nature herself needed a lawyer Lawrence could defend her with ease While she emphasizes answers to the most obvious riddling uestions we all have about the flora fauna and natural phenomena in New England Why do so many skunks end up as roadkill? What kind of beetle keeps thudding against the screen door in summer? Does ragweed have any redeeming traits? How do I pick out the seasonal constellations? Where do Christmas cacti come from? How do rainbows work?she also reveals the hidden patterns that make each one resilient uniue and connected to us No matter how little or how much I had been exposed to these things before reading I was inspired to look closer in every case often coming to respect even the most unsavory creatures just a bit


  5. Dee Renee Chesnut Dee Renee Chesnut says:

    This book rates 5 stars for it is worth keeping on your shelf for reference It is divided into seasons to help the beginner observe what might be happening at any given moment at the home of the reader I recommend it to parents of inuisitive children There are plenty of illustrations by Adelaide Murphy


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