The Cost of Discipleship PDF/EPUB ï The Cost MOBI


    Free Unlimited eBook grace and costly The Cost MOBI :↠ grace Cheap grace, Bonhoeffer wrote, is the grace we bestow on ourselvesgrace without discipleshipCostly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the girl which must be asked for, the door at which a man must knowIt is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life The Cost of Discipleship is a compelling statement of the demands of sacrifice and ethical consistency from a man whose life and thought were exemplary articulations of a new type of leadership inspired by the Gospel, and imbued with the spirit of Christian humanism and a creative sense of civic duty."/>
  • Paperback
  • 320 pages
  • The Cost of Discipleship
  • Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • English
  • 02 August 2018
  • 0684815001

10 thoughts on “The Cost of Discipleship

  1. Dwight Davis Dwight Davis says:

    I went into Discipleship thinking that I would really hate it I love the early academic theology of Bonhoeffer, and I m really interested in Bonhoeffer studies, but I figured that a book couldn t be that interesting and ground breaking if so many fundamentalists love it I was so wrong.Bonhoeffer puts forth a lot of very radical ideas here The idea of the Church being the physical manifestation of Christ, and therefore vicariously representing Christ on earth is brilliant Bonhoeffer completel I went into Discipleship thinking that I would really hate it I love the early academic theology of Bonhoeffer, and I m really interested in Bonhoeffer studies, but I figured that a book couldn t be that interesting and ground breaking if so many fundamentalists love it I was so wrong.Bonhoeffer puts forth a lot of very radical ideas here The idea of the Church being the physical manifestation of Christ, and therefore vicariously representing Christ on earth is brilliant Bonhoeffer completely redefines ontology and personhood Bonhoeffer argues, The new human being is not the single individual who has been justified and sanctified rather, the new human being is the church community, the body of Christ, or Christ himself The implications of this train of thought on philosophy, theology, ontology, ethics, race issues, ecclesiology, etc are staggering And yet Evangelicals skip over these ideas and only talk about Bonhoeffer s concept of cheap and costly grace While that is a great meditation on the role of grace in our lives, there s so muchto this book Having a knowledge of Bonhoeffer s life, particularly his role in the conspiracy against Hitler, his context in Nazi Germany, and his disgust with the holocaust, is essential to fully understanding this work According to the German editors of this volume, this work is entirely bound up in Bonhoeffer s life, inseparably so.This critical edition is essential reading The editors do a great job of providing contextual footnotes to help the reader understand many of the concepts presented here and how they are being built on the foundation of his early academic theology The foreword and afterword are incredibly helpful as well


  2. Werner Werner says:

    Although I had a vague memory, when the Christian Goodreaders group chose this book as a common read, of having read some of Bonhoeffer s writings back in my early 20s, I now believe that what I read back then was his Life Together The Classic Exploration of Christian Community which I m currently rereading I had no recollection, over my recent days of reading, of having read any of the text previously If I had read it even back then, I think it would have madeof an impression on me Although I had a vague memory, when the Christian Goodreaders group chose this book as a common read, of having read some of Bonhoeffer s writings back in my early 20s, I now believe that what I read back then was his Life Together The Classic Exploration of Christian Community which I m currently rereading I had no recollection, over my recent days of reading, of having read any of the text previously If I had read it even back then, I think it would have madeof an impression on me but I also think I would have been too immature in my Christian experience at that time to fully appreciate and engage with it That isn t to say that my ability to do so now is perfect either, but I have the advantage of over forty years of added growth and perspective Also, I have the added benefit of having read Eric Metaxas biography of Bonhoeffer, Bonhoeffer Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy a year ago, which got five stars from me my review is here , and which considerably enhanced both my understanding of Bonhoeffer s thought and my admiration for him as a person.Bonhoeffer has to be ranked as one of the top theological thinkers, in the classical Christian tradition, of the 20th century, and probably of any century His objective here, however, is not an abstract summation of Christian doctrine, but a practical exposition of how Christian doctrine bids Christ s disciples to live in the concrete reality of a world that s very hostile to Christianity While his concern is practical, however, it has to be said that unlike C S Lewis, a thinker to whom I d accord similar stature he s not writing to make his thought accessible to the average layperson This is very much, not only serious theology, but academic theology informed by his background in graduate theological study and in higher education teaching Indeed, the material here is based directly on his lectures teaching in the Confessing Church s underground seminary the experience which in turn is the basis for Life Together, so the two books have an organic relationship Reading it was heavy sledding intellectually for me and I have a seminary degree because of the complexity of the thought Another challenge derives from the fact that it was originally written in German Bonhoeffer had studied in the U.S and could speak English, but he once said that he could express himself theologically much better in German If rendering his thoughts into English was hard for him, one can guess that it sometimes poses difficulty for translators, too I read this in the Macmillan reprint of the 1959 2nd ed of the Student Christian Movement s translation by R H Fuller with some revision by Irmgard Booth, which was the first edition to translate the whole work The book has four principal parts the first is a basic discussion of the relationship of Christian living to salvation by grace through faith, in the context of Bonhoeffer s Lutheran background I was raised as a Lutheran, so could relate to this As it developed historically, the Lutheran tradition in practice stressed the role of God s unearned grace in salvation to the point that it made any kind of actual Christian living in obedience to God s commands into an optional afterthought at best, and at worst even viewed it as a hindrance to faith, since the supposed essence of faith was treated as believing that you could now do anything you wanted to and still be saved by grace an attitude Bonhoeffer characterizes as cheap grace My eventual disgust with this attitude as a teen, if fact, was a major reason for my leaving the Lutheran church Bonhoeffer remained a Lutheran, but regarded this kind of cheap grace as a perversion of Luther s thought A life of radical obedience to God discipleship is in fact the object of God s call to humans in salvation, and is enabled by the same free grace that enables conversion and salvation itself it does not earn salvation nor accord merit to the disciples, but is nonetheless inseparable from salvation.In the second and third parts, Bonhoeffer works through the Sermon on the Mount and the sending out of the twelve disciples as messengers of the Kingdom of God in the Gospel of Matthew, dealing with the Biblical text in expository fashion and often with significant interpretive insights as a source of principles or blueprint for what characteristics Christian discipleship needs to embody in the modern context or, indeed, in any cultural context His Bible based understanding of the Christian church as very literally the Body of Christ, the earthly continuation of Christ s saving and serving incarnation in the world, by virtue of our real and dynamic union with him as believers, joined to both his redemptive death and his resurrected new life is the focus of the final part.My appreciation for Bonhoeffer s thought isn t without specific disagreements In particular, he espouses a strong vocational pacifist ethic that is, waging war and administering forcible justice is okay for the State and its agents, but the Christian isn t allowed to take part in it because of our supposedly different calling , based principally on literal interpretations of language used by Jesus in places in the Sermon on the Mount that I would consider hyperbolic in context, and as qualified by other Scriptures A detailed discussion of the case for and against Christian vocational pacifism isn t appropriate here, but I think the position is flawed and logically contradictory It s also not a position that Bonhoeffer himself ultimately stuck with, since he eventually came to believe that his Christian moral duty in obedience to God required him to assist in the conspiracy to assassinate Hitler Some of his pacifist admirers today refuse to acknowledge this, but the evidence is overwhelming I also disagree with his Lutheran sacramental theology, which embraces infant baptism as an actual producer of saving albeit invisible faith IMO, believer s baptism would beconsistent with his view of radical discipleship and with the New Testament s view of baptism But those disagreements don t, for me, diminish the overall value of this book Even when you disagree with Bonhoeffer, he s intellectually and spiritually stimulating.This edition has a very short Foreword by Anglican Bishop G K A Bell, who knew Bonhoeffer personally, and a roughly 24 page biographical memoir by Bonhoeffer s brother in law, Gerhard Leibholz, which also reproduces, in English translation, a couple of Bonhoeffer s poems written in prison In summation, I don t think this book would appeal to non Christian readers throughout, it presupposes a Christian faith commitment, and can t really be appreciated without that But I would highly recommend it for all college educated Christians who can handle the reading level


  3. Sandy Ferguson Sandy Ferguson says:

    Where does one begin This is a book that will profoundly change your understanding about what it means to be a person of faith in the world Bonhoeffer challenges us to look beyond the values of this world, and asks us are we willing to embrace the true cost of discipleship His analysis of cheap grace, and its corrupting influence reminds us that there are times that we have to challenge the powers of this world, that there are times when to be a good Christian means we can t always be a good c Where does one begin This is a book that will profoundly change your understanding about what it means to be a person of faith in the world Bonhoeffer challenges us to look beyond the values of this world, and asks us are we willing to embrace the true cost of discipleship His analysis of cheap grace, and its corrupting influence reminds us that there are times that we have to challenge the powers of this world, that there are times when to be a good Christian means we can t always be a good citizen Bonhoeffer wrote in the shadow of evil, made even worse by the reality that many so called Christians were only too willing to serve Adolf Hitler and his evil regime Bonhoeffer makes it clear to the reader that cheap grace is at the heart of such fatal compromises of faith, that allow evil to flourish It is through understanding costly grace, that we can embrace discipleship that will allow us to witness to this world in such a way that we are freed from the powers of this world.Bonhoeffer s words are just as important today, as they were in the dark days of the Nazis, and will always challenge us in our faith


  4. booklady booklady says:

    Listened to the audio version of this book and found it very compelling It challenged me in ways I didn t know I needed challenging, which is why it earns 5 stars from me As a lifelong cultural Catholic and for the last twenty years or so actively striving to be Christlike Catholic, I need books which help me to look at my faith from a fresh perspective.Bonhoeffer s eclectic approach to the Gospels reminds me very much of his German compatriot and one of my other favorite authors, Pope Bened Listened to the audio version of this book and found it very compelling It challenged me in ways I didn t know I needed challenging, which is why it earns 5 stars from me As a lifelong cultural Catholic and for the last twenty years or so actively striving to be Christlike Catholic, I need books which help me to look at my faith from a fresh perspective.Bonhoeffer s eclectic approach to the Gospels reminds me very much of his German compatriot and one of my other favorite authors, Pope Benedict XVI The fact that they are both devout German Christians couldn t have anything to do with that could it Especially insightful in this text are Bonhoeffer s contrast between cheap and costly Grace his exegesis on the encounters between Jesus and the Rich Young Man and others and his challenges to our understanding of our own discipleship.Highly recommended, especially in the audio format I was reluctant to do anything else once I started listening


  5. Mike Mike says:

    I have spent most of my life attending what are generally called the mainline Protestant denominations in the US I grew up in the United Methodist Church and I m now a PCUSA Presbyterian I have heard this book quoted or referenced In sermons and bible studiestimes than I can count But I had never actually read it myself so I decided to as part of a Lenten discipline of reading only books on religion during Lent Having now finished, I am surprised at its popularity among liberal Christi I have spent most of my life attending what are generally called the mainline Protestant denominations in the US I grew up in the United Methodist Church and I m now a PCUSA Presbyterian I have heard this book quoted or referenced In sermons and bible studiestimes than I can count But I had never actually read it myself so I decided to as part of a Lenten discipline of reading only books on religion during Lent Having now finished, I am surprised at its popularity among liberal Christians Don t get me wrong, I liked a lot it but the message of this book is that the gospel is true, that it is urgent that it be proclaimed, and that all men need to repent and follow it This is so very different from the Stuart Smalley like I m good enough, I m smart enough, and doggone it, people like me school of preaching that I hearSundays than not Here s a couple of sentences from Bonhoeffer Nothing could beruthless than to make men think there is still plenty of time to mend their ways To tell men that their cause is urgent and that the kingdom of God is at hand is the most charitable and merciful act we can perform, the most joyous news we can bring Now maybe your PCUSA or United Methodist or Episcopal Church or ELCA Lutheran church is different from mine, but that s not the message I m hearing every Sunday How I wish I did So why is Bonhoeffer quoted so often I think it is mainly that his heroic life and martyrdom while struggling against the Nazis has made his biographyprominent than his theology And the phrase cheap grace makes a nice sound bite for those who ve never really taken the time to read what Bonhoeffer meant by it And that s a shame because there is much here that we in 21st century America need to hear Anyway, I have the book 4 stars On message and theology, I d give it 5 but it is pretty thick and not easily readable in parts How much of that is due to translation issues from the original German and how much is due to it being just a very academic writing styleI don t know I had the same issue when I read Pope Benedict s book on the life of Christ Perhaps I just have a problem reading German theologians I would also note that this probably isn t the best book for a non Christian or someone who has been away from church a while It presupposes a pretty good grasp on the bible and basic concepts of theology CS Lewis Mere Christianity would be a better introductory kind of book But if you re looking for a meaty, substantive theological treatise, this is a good one


  6. Brett Brett says:

    This book will mess you up, and you will be better for it at least it should Bonhoeffer combats what he coins cheap grace i.e., grace with no demand, no cost, no cross He demonstrates that the life of discipleship is the life of crucifixion But this is not from some pussified metrosexual pastor, wearing his tight button down, throwing around terms like imitatio christi No, this is from a man who did it, who faithfully followed and bore witness to Christ until the end when he was hung This book will mess you up, and you will be better for it at least it should Bonhoeffer combats what he coins cheap grace i.e., grace with no demand, no cost, no cross He demonstrates that the life of discipleship is the life of crucifixion But this is not from some pussified metrosexual pastor, wearing his tight button down, throwing around terms like imitatio christi No, this is from a man who did it, who faithfully followed and bore witness to Christ until the end when he was hung naked with thin wireI just read this quote from the camp doctor who witnessed his death I saw Pastor Bonhoeffer kneeling on the floor praying fervently to God I was most deeply moved by the way this lovable man prayed, so devout and so certain that God heard his prayer At the place of execution, he again said a short prayer and then climbed the few steps to the gallows, brave and composed His death ensued after a few seconds In the almost fifty years that I worked as a doctor, I have hardly ever seen a man die so entirely submissive to the will of God


  7. Amy Amy says:

    It took me about two years to read this one I would pick it up, pause to meditate on a profound line, misplace the book, find it weeks later, read a little , pause to mediate, lose it againI m not used to reading books I cannot zip through But this one seriously challenged me I couldn t rush through it I needed to stop and think about what it actually meant Words to describe it Profound Thought provoking Challenging Encouraging Motivating I forgot how much I missed doctrine It It took me about two years to read this one I would pick it up, pause to meditate on a profound line, misplace the book, find it weeks later, read a little , pause to mediate, lose it againI m not used to reading books I cannot zip through But this one seriously challenged me I couldn t rush through it I needed to stop and think about what it actually meant Words to describe it Profound Thought provoking Challenging Encouraging Motivating I forgot how much I missed doctrine It was like a breath of fresh air The downside of taking such a long time to read it is that I m not sure I can pin point what all impacted me or which quotes I liked best It did it gradually and I fell in love with them all I guess this just means I need to read it again


  8. Amanda Geaney Amanda Geaney says:

    Whew My brain is mush.It has been really helpful for me to read this book alongside my friend and mentor We have gotten together over the past three weeks and oncethis Friday to discuss what we ve read and how our lives as disciples differ from Bonhoeffer s definition of a disciple UPDATE 9 14 18 I came across this article which helped me better understand Bonhoeffer s theology We need to be discerning readers A Reliable Guide Whew My brain is mush.It has been really helpful for me to read this book alongside my friend and mentor We have gotten together over the past three weeks and oncethis Friday to discuss what we ve read and how our lives as disciples differ from Bonhoeffer s definition of a disciple UPDATE 9 14 18 I came across this article which helped me better understand Bonhoeffer s theology We need to be discerning readers A Reliable Guide


  9. Bob Bob says:

    I m not going to attempt to review such a classic work Rather, I thought I would comment on what I thought were some striking themes in Bonhoeffer s work.One thing is the theme of unqualified obedience to Christ One of Bonhoeffer s chapters is The Call of Discipleship and I think that may have been an evenappropriate title for the book The call is both a gracious call, one we need but don t deserve, and a call to implicit, unqualified obedience in following Christ, as in the case of I m not going to attempt to review such a classic work Rather, I thought I would comment on what I thought were some striking themes in Bonhoeffer s work.One thing is the theme of unqualified obedience to Christ One of Bonhoeffer s chapters is The Call of Discipleship and I think that may have been an evenappropriate title for the book The call is both a gracious call, one we need but don t deserve, and a call to implicit, unqualified obedience in following Christ, as in the case of the rich young man In various ways, we want to follow Jesus and For Bonhoeffer, it is Jesus alone.His chapter on the enemy was interesting in light of his eventual participation in an assassination plot against Hitler The book discussion group I was in all struggled with reconciling what he wrote about unreserved love for the enemy with his actions against Hitler From reading Metaxas biography on Bonhoeffer, it may be the case that he didn t reconcile these but simply saw this as a tragic necessity for which he was prepared to accept judgment not only by men but God.Finally, one of the striking themes of this book is the idea that discipleship is inescapably lived out in the visible community of the church In fact, he cannot think of sanctification in purely personal terms but only in the context of the church Whereas we may tend to think of the church as instrumental in our growth in holiness, Bonhoeffer would see the bride of Christ being prepared for her wedding day, that bride being the church.As you can see from the edition, this one has been on the shelves a long time I read about 100 pages in college and then set it aside Perhaps that was enough challenge for a young disciple Thanks to the Dead Theologians Society reading group for helping me read the whole


  10. Khari Khari says:

    Well, I finished.It took me a long time, and I essentially have no idea what I just read, but I finished How can I find the biography of Bonhoeffer so muchmeaningful than the primary documents he wrote Probably because I couldn t understand them.I definitely overestimated myself with this book If it follows other patterns of my life, if I leave it alone and let it percolate for another decade or two and come back to it, I might possible understand it the next time.The only thing I reall Well, I finished.It took me a long time, and I essentially have no idea what I just read, but I finished How can I find the biography of Bonhoeffer so muchmeaningful than the primary documents he wrote Probably because I couldn t understand them.I definitely overestimated myself with this book If it follows other patterns of my life, if I leave it alone and let it percolate for another decade or two and come back to it, I might possible understand it the next time.The only thing I really got out of this book was his insistence that the fruit of the Spirit is something that happens to believers unconsciously It s a bit long, but this quote sums it up pretty well From this it follows that we can never be conscious of our good works Our sanctification is veiled from our eyes until the last day, when all secrets will be disclosed If we want to see some results here and assess our own spiritual state, and have not the patience to wait, we have our reward The moment we begin to feel satisfied that we are making some progress along the road of sanctification, it is all thenecessary to repent and confess that all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags I think that in some ways he is quite right I have noticed in my own life that when I start to notice Hey, I m doing better at this area in my life Go me That hubris inevitably precedes a drastic failure and backsliding period On the other hand, when someone else notices and says Hey you are doing better in this area in your life I m like Really I don t think so I hadn t noticed Obviously the behavior must have changed dramatically if someone else is noticing it, but those are usually the areas where the inner being is the foundation of the struggle and that inner carnality doesn t seem to ever lose it s power


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The Cost of Discipleship[Reading] ➶ The Cost of Discipleship By Dietrich Bonhoeffer – Thomashillier.co.uk One of the most important theologians of the twentieth century illuminates the relationship between ourselves and the teachings of Jesus in this classic text on ethics, humanism, and civic dutyWhat ca One of the most important theologians of the twentieth century illuminates the relationship between ourselves and the teachings of Jesus in this classic text on ethics, humanism, and civic dutyWhat can the call to discipleship, the adherence to the word of Jesus, mean today to the businessman, the soldier, the laborer, or the aristocrat What did Jesus mean to say to us What is his will for us today Drawing on the Sermon on the Mount, Dietrich Bonhoeffer answers these timeless questions by providing a seminal reading of the dichotomy between cheap grace and costly The Cost MOBI :↠ grace Cheap grace, Bonhoeffer wrote, is the grace we bestow on ourselvesgrace without discipleshipCostly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the girl which must be asked for, the door at which a man must knowIt is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life The Cost of Discipleship is a compelling statement of the demands of sacrifice and ethical consistency from a man whose life and thought were exemplary articulations of a new type of leadership inspired by the Gospel, and imbued with the spirit of Christian humanism and a creative sense of civic duty.


About the Author: Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a German Lutheran pastor and theologian He was also a participant in the German Resistance movement against Nazism, a founding member of the Confessing Church His involvement in plans by members of the Abwehr the German Military Intelligence Office to assassinate Adolf Hitler resulted in his arrest in April and his subsequent execution by hanging in April , shortly before the war s end His view of Christianity s role in the secular world has become very influential.