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10 thoughts on “Three Score and Ten

  1. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Rating 4.5 of fiveThe Book Description Finished posthumously by her close friend, C A Lejeune, Three Score and Ten concludes the Barsetshire series with the birthday party of the heroine of the first novel, Laura Morland, now seventy years old, surrounded by her grown family, her literary legacy, and the same small town drama that enchanted and amused readers thirty years previously Thirkell s last, unfinished novel features a host of new and old friends from the author s beloved Barsetshi Rating 4.5 of fiveThe Book Description Finished posthumously by her close friend, C A Lejeune, Three Score and Ten concludes the Barsetshire series with the birthday party of the heroine of the first novel, Laura Morland, now seventy years old, surrounded by her grown family, her literary legacy, and the same small town drama that enchanted and amused readers thirty years previously Thirkell s last, unfinished novel features a host of new and old friends from the author s beloved Barsetshire This time out, a little boy appears to save Wiple Terrace, home of Miss Hampton and Miss Bent, from destruction The budding romance between Lord Mellings and Lavinia Merton flowers, a past love finds Dr Ford, and the Old Bank House provides the setting for the final scene, an all Barsetshire party My Review Of all the bittersweet pleasures I know, the completion of a dead author s beloved series stands alone at the top of my list This, the twenty ninth book in Thirkell s Barsetshire series, is never to have a companion added It is a shame, on one level, and a relief on another.I love the divagations and arabesques of illogic and whimsy that Thirkell specialized in One s gently daft old Great Aunt Maude, speaking from the edge of the grave to one s child self, telling stories of the damnedest thingslife before TV Horses as transportation instead of sport No showers how extraordinary, how unimaginably primitive, how exciting Laura Morland, introduced in the first book as the slightly harassed and mildly put upon widowed mother of four wildly energetic, not terribly obedient sons, newly arrived in Barsetshire, is now turning seventy, which was quite a great age in 1959 She sits writing her Madame Koska thrillers, one after another, each just like the next and quite happily so she has her youngest son s oldest son wished on her for the summer hols she goes to parties, visits old friends for tea, takes pretty no longer young single women to the lairs of elderly single men and somehow makes it all come out right Mrs Morland is of the fabric of Barsetshire She is the weft of the cloth, putting the picture into perspective, adding color and strength, and yet her lifetime habit of self deprecation is ingrained and requires her to play down her milestone birthday and reject a party celebrating it in her honor.And herein the relief of the series ending The attitudes of fifty years ago can jar on modern sensibilities The attitudes considered old fashioned fifty years ago And of course, as anyone who has read the books before this one knows, there s the racism inherent in the time and place, most strongly evidenced by Thirkell s portraits of the Mixo Lydian Ambassadress Ye gods The assumption that one must be married, must have a wife to care for one, a husband whose babies to have, isn t exactly in line with today s thinking and was slowly losing its hold on womanity even in 1959 The country simple folks whose lives revolve around the rhythms of nature and the needs of their domestic cattle and crops, then a doomed lot of old fashioned yokels, are now quite celebrated by the culture Look at the Fabulous Beekman Boys They re making a living out of promoting this very lifestyle, a gay couple riffing on Martha Stewart and probably unknowingly Thirkell Go read their blog You ll see what I mean Sharon Springs is like Barchester in a number of ways But for all that, the sheer delight of sitting with Mrs Morland, the authoress s well known alter ego in the stories, as she contentedly runs out the sands in her life s hourglass, looking not ahead by much and back with a good deal of affection, is quite a pleasant experience Mrs Morland isn t dead yet, you see, she isn t just waiting for God, she is smiling and chatting and dispensing her inimitable style of wisdom to the young things quite without portentousness or even awareness of what she s doing The Leslies, the Fosters the Pomfrets, one supposes , the Thornes and Mertons and Keithsof all generationsopen their homes to Laura Morland, celebrated authoress, and old friend in this last installment As Mrs Thirkell herself died at seventy one, it isn t a huge leap to imagine all these quiet teas and dull dinners self described and Agricultural Shows as Mrs Morland s own last ones, and see them in this sweetly golden glow of times well and truly lost.Being a Thirkell novel, well story since novel implies a plot of which this dear and lovely creation is void, there are engagements that will lead to the next generation s birth and upbringing, there are young people of every age busily engaged in the business of becoming themselves, there are so many many bustling scenes of no great moment but such deep pleasurethe knowledge that, despite the impending departure of the main character for good and all, there will be other lives and other worlds and new perspectives on it all The sadness we feel at inevitable loss is tempered, as it always should be, by the eternal verity that Life, my dear, Life Goes On.I love Barsetshire, and need its beautiful landscapes and wonderful people in my mental furniture And sad as I am that I can t go there afresh in a new book, I m so pleased to have had the chance to close the circle in finally reading this deeply autobiographical book The door to Barsetshire, however, I refuse to close The breeze from it is so beguilingly fresh


  2. Katrina Katrina says:

    This book is still well worth reading despite it having to be finished by Thirkell s friend C.A Lejeune This book is still well worth reading despite it having to be finished by Thirkell s friend C.A Lejeune


  3. Alisha Alisha says:

    Farewell, Angela Thirkell.This was her last book, and a friend had to finish it for her, but the transition appears seamless This one brings in nearly ALL of her previous characters, if not in detail at least mentioned in passing It is a very fitting send off to a long series of books The series began in High Rising with Laura Morland, harassed mother and authoress, and it concludes with her 70th birthday, an event which draws nearly all the inhabitants of the county together for old times Farewell, Angela Thirkell.This was her last book, and a friend had to finish it for her, but the transition appears seamless This one brings in nearly ALL of her previous characters, if not in detail at least mentioned in passing It is a very fitting send off to a long series of books The series began in High Rising with Laura Morland, harassed mother and authoress, and it concludes with her 70th birthday, an event which draws nearly all the inhabitants of the county together for old times sake There are still a few engagements to be arranged, as there are in every Thirkell book There are village fetes, dinners, and tea parties There are incorrigible but good hearted children, comfortable friends, and desultory conversations It s life with rose coloured glasses I find it a little difficult to place this book, because it was published in 1961, which to me is an era that starts to scream modern literature, but even though these characters are meant to be contemporary 1960 ish, they feel muchold fashioned I suppose that is because MOST of the focal characters are now middle aged or elderly By the time of her last book, Thirkell seemed to spare very little time for the 20 somethings they only make the grade if they can follow in their parents footsteps and stay a little old fashioned themselves Her characters are nostalgic.The other thing that makes this book feel very old is the presence of the nobility as an American who is only self educated about Britain, I had the idea that by the 1960s the lords and ladies were gettingrare, but in this book the county is bursting with them, even though they re significantly reduced in their lifestyle And they take a really active part in the doings of the county everyone seems to be friends with them And now I wonder, was that part of Angela Thirkell s personal nostalgia, or were there still lots of highly visible landed gentry in mid 20th century Britain Anyway, it has been a treat to read Angela Thirkell s funny, pensive books where sometimes the characters think just the way I would and where, by the end, all is contentment and peace


  4. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    What a nice book not the strongest as far as plot ahem goes, and it certainly took some time to get going, but, as the last posthumous, in fact of Thirkell s books, it adds a lovely note to the conclusion The last chapter about Mrs Morland s party is priceless, and I was surprised to get a tad teary over the description of the Barshetshire book she s given, since it echoes so many memories I and many other readers, I m sure, have of the pleasures of the series Equally bittersweet is the What a nice book not the strongest as far as plot ahem goes, and it certainly took some time to get going, but, as the last posthumous, in fact of Thirkell s books, it adds a lovely note to the conclusion The last chapter about Mrs Morland s party is priceless, and I was surprised to get a tad teary over the description of the Barshetshire book she s given, since it echoes so many memories I and many other readers, I m sure, have of the pleasures of the series Equally bittersweet is the fact that Thirkell herself died at 70 All in all, a suitable requiem


  5. LDuchess LDuchess says:

    This is NOT the pb Moyer Bell 2005 edition shown above, whick is RIDDLED with typos Very aggravating Mine is the original Hamish Hamilton 1961 hardbound with dust cover.Sounds like AT to the end she left it unfinished Finished by C.A Lejeune.Ludo Lavinia plan a wedding, Mrs Morland is given a birthday party This is NOT the pb Moyer Bell 2005 edition shown above, whick is RIDDLED with typos Very aggravating Mine is the original Hamish Hamilton 1961 hardbound with dust cover.Sounds like AT to the end she left it unfinished Finished by C.A Lejeune.Ludo Lavinia plan a wedding, Mrs Morland is given a birthday party


  6. Jocelyn Jocelyn says:

    Angela Thirkell s last book I judged that Thirkell died at the end of p 116 If so, her last written words were, Then their talk went back comfortably to old times I decided to stop reading there After going to the end to see who married whom, according to the author who finished the book.


  7. Deb Deb says:

    And the very last word of the very last book is England Just right.


  8. Susan Susan says:

    This was published posthumously, and finished by someone else, based on Thirkell s manuscript and notes It doesn t read quite like the other Thirkells, but it s close.


  9. Judi Judi says:

    I shed a tear or two after reading the last book in this series Thirkell and the writer who finished the book after tHirkell s did a fantastic job of encapsulating the whole series in this final peek at Barteshire life My favorite characters were included, Laura Moreland, and Heather Adams of I tell you what fame We are also introduced to Robin Moreland, Laura s grandson, who says I know to the irritation of others just as his father Tony had done The last scene of the books is particula I shed a tear or two after reading the last book in this series Thirkell and the writer who finished the book after tHirkell s did a fantastic job of encapsulating the whole series in this final peek at Barteshire life My favorite characters were included, Laura Moreland, and Heather Adams of I tell you what fame We are also introduced to Robin Moreland, Laura s grandson, who says I know to the irritation of others just as his father Tony had done The last scene of the books is particularly tender and reminds us that although time marches on, the Barteshire traditions will continue


  10. Katherine Spivey Katherine Spivey says:

    Excellent wrap up to the series.


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Three Score and Ten [Download] ➺ Three Score and Ten ➿ Angela Thirkell – Thomashillier.co.uk The last of the Barsetshire novels, left unfinished by Thirkell at her death at , was completed from extensive notes by a friend and fellow writer, C A Lejeune Regardless of its provenance, it is a re The last of the Barsetshire novels, left unfinished by Thirkell at her death at , was completed from extensive notes by a friend and fellow writer, C A Lejeune Regardless of its provenance, it is a remarkable reprise of the whole series Mrs Morland Thirkell s alter ego , the protagonist of the first book, High Rising, is again the centre of action She turns seventy affording the opportunity for a final gathering of our favourite people who continue to act as Three Score Kindle - expected on all occasions Young Robin Morland, son of the irrepressible Tony, helps or hinders or both at once Along the way, Wiple Terrace with its motley complement of tenants is rescued from the depredations of the odious Lord Aberfordbury of Pookers Piece fame Mr Adams and Gradka, an unlikely duo, form a syndicate to frustrate his aims Matrimonial fodder is provided by the expected match between Ludo Pomfret and Lavinia Merton and the unexpected one between Dr Ford and Sylvia Gould which we thought had come about thirty years ago.

  • Paperback
  • 318 pages
  • Three Score and Ten
  • Angela Thirkell
  • English
  • 14 February 2019
  • 1559213140

About the Author: Angela Thirkell

Angela Margaret Mackail was born on January , at Young Street, Kensington Square, London Her grandfather was Sir Edward Burne Jones the pre Raphaelite painter and partner in the design firm of Morris and Company for whom he designed many stained glass windows seven of which are in St Margaret s Church in Rottingdean, West Sussex Her grandmother was Georgiana Macdonald, one of a precocious family which included among others, Stanley Baldwin, the Prime Minister, and Rudyard Kipling Angela s Three Score Kindle - brother, Denis Mackail, was also a prolific and successful novelist Angela s mother, Margaret Burne Jones, married John Mackail an administrator at the Ministry of Education and Professor of Poetry at Oxford UniversityAngela married James Campbell McInnes in James was a professional Baritone and performed at concert halls throughout the UK In their first son Graham was born and in a second son, Colin A daughter was born in at the same time her marriage was breaking up In November a divorce was granted and Angela and the children went to live with her parents in Pembroke Gardens in London The child, Mary, died the next yearAngela then met and married George Lancelot Thirkell in and in they traveled on a troop ship to George s hometown in Australia Their adventures on the Friedricksruh are recounted in her Trooper to the Southern Cross published in In , in Melbourne Australia, her youngest son Lancelot George was born Angela left Australia in with year old Lance and never returned Although living with her parents in London she badly needed to earn a living so she set forth on the difficult road of the professional writer Her first book, Three Houses, a memoir of her happy childhood was published in and was an immediate success The first of her novels set in Trollope s mythical county of Barsetshire was Demon in the House, followed by others, one each yearAngela also wrote a book of children s stories entitled The Grateful Sparrow using Ludwig Richter s illustrations a biography of Harriette Wilson, The Fortunes of Harriette an historical novel, Coronation Summer, an account of the events in London during Queen Victoria s Coronation in and three semi autobiographical novels, Ankle Deep and Oh, These Men, These Men and Trooper to the Southern Cross When Angela died on the th of January she left unfinished the last of her books, Three Score and Ten which was completed by her friend, Caroline LeJeune Angela is buried in Rottingdean alongside her daughter Mary and her Burne Jones grandparents.