The Wild Boys Kindle ✓ The Wild eBook ´


The Wild Boys ❃ [EPUB] ✻ The Wild Boys By William S. Burroughs ➜ – Thomashillier.co.uk The Wild Boys is a futuristic tale of global warfare in which a guerrilla gang of boys dedicated to freedom battles the organized armies of repressive police states Making full use of his inimitable h The Wild Boys is a futuristic tale of global warfare in which a guerrilla gang of boys dedicated to freedom battles the organized armies of repressive police states Making full use of his inimitable humor, wild imagination, and style, Burroughs creates a world that is as terrifying as it is fascinating.

    Free Unlimited eBook wild imagination, and style, Burroughs creates a world that is as terrifying as it is fascinating."/>
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 184 pages
  • The Wild Boys
  • William S. Burroughs
  • 06 March 2019

About the Author: William S. Burroughs

William Seward Burroughs II, also known by his pen name William Lee February , August , was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author, he is considered to be one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the th century His influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture The Wild eBook ´ as well as literature Burroughs wrote novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays Five books have been published of his interviews and correspondences He also collaborated on projects and recordings with numerous performers and musicians, and made many appearances in filmsHe was born to a wealthy family in St Louis, Missouri, grandson of the inventor and founder of the Burroughs Corporation, William Seward Burroughs I, and nephew of public relations manager Ivy Lee Burroughs began writing essays and journals in early adolescence He left home in to attend Harvard University, studied English, and anthropology as a postgraduate, and later attended medical school in Vienna After being turned down by the Office of Strategic Services and US Navy in to serve in World War II, he dropped out and became afflicted with the drug addiction that affected him for the rest of his life, while working a variety of jobs In while living in New York City, he befriended Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, the mutually influential foundation of what became the countercultural movement of the Beat GenerationMuch of Burroughs s work is semi autobiographical, primarily drawn from his experiences as a heroin addict, as he lived throughout Mexico City, London, Paris, Berlin, the South Americanand Tangier in Morocco Finding success with his confessional first novel, Junkie , Burroughs is perhaps best known for his third novel Naked Lunch , a controversy fraught work that underwent a court case under the US sodomy laws With Brion Gysin, he also popularized the literary cut up technique in works such as The Nova Trilogy In , Burroughs was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and in was awarded the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by France Jack Kerouac called Burroughs the greatest satirical writer since Jonathan Swift , a reputation he owes to his lifelong subversion of the moral, political and economic systems of modern American society, articulated in often darkly humorous sardonicism J G Ballard considered Burroughs to be the most important writer to emerge since the Second World War , while Norman Mailer declared him the only American writer who may be conceivably possessed by geniusBurroughs had one child, William Seward Burroughs III , with his second wife Joan Vollmer Vollmer died in in Mexico City Burroughs was convicted of manslaughter in Vollmer s death, an event that deeply permeated all of his writings Burroughs died at his home in Lawrence, Kansas, after suffering a heart attack in .



10 thoughts on “The Wild Boys

  1. Luke Luke says:

    Anybody that likes William S Burroughs only says that because they want to sound like they can comprehend what in the hell he s talking about when NO ONE actually can Or they just saw the Naked Lunch movie and thought that talking beetle type writers are cool Anybody that likes William S Burroughs only says that because they want to sound like they can comprehend what in the hell he s talking about when NO ONE actually can Or they just saw the Naked Lunch movie and thought that talking beetle type writers are cool

  2. Kat Vomit Kat Vomit says:

    I learned that reading Burroughs on the bus makes me feel incredibly filthy and awkward from this book It could be all the allusions to the smell of rectal mucus, or maybe I m just weird.

  3. Lynn Lynn says:

    I was relatively innocent when I read The Wild Boys and it gave me nightmares The staccato, choppy plot is too disjointed to ever really allow anything to come to a close so the images tend to remain in some vestibule of the brain and come spilling out at night when your poor consciousness tries to form them into some kind of completeness.The images themselves are sometimes gruesome and you can almost sense Burroughs lunatic energy and all his wild imaginings spilling out on the page and being I was relatively innocent when I read The Wild Boys and it gave me nightmares The staccato, choppy plot is too disjointed to ever really allow anything to come to a close so the images tend to remain in some vestibule of the brain and come spilling out at night when your poor consciousness tries to form them into some kind of completeness.The images themselves are sometimes gruesome and you can almost sense Burroughs lunatic energy and all his wild imaginings spilling out on the page and being herded somewhat unsuccessfully into the form of a novel Some people will have trouble with the homosexual imagery, but almost everyone will be haunted to some extent by the casual eroticization of death and cruelty I think the Mayan sequences are some of the most persistent.But this is not mere incoherent pornography, there is a wild, energetic beauty and an almost religious devotion to wontonly intense experience that is along with WSB s poetic style unforgettable.Lynn Hoffman, author of the much less disturbing bang BANG A Novel and the downright soothing New Short Course in Wine,The

  4. Nate D Nate D says:

    Sir, we ve been overrun by clawed pubescent urchins, requesting backup Choppy, anarchic, gleefully pornographic, confrontationally off putting Yet satirical, clever, kinetically experimental, serially engaging in spite of itself And completely caught up in its own desires to denial of any other readerly needs, which has its merits, even if the stuttering stop start repeat of the images here has a decidedly masturbatory quite literally aspect and associated outside boredome With some of the Sir, we ve been overrun by clawed pubescent urchins, requesting backup Choppy, anarchic, gleefully pornographic, confrontationally off putting Yet satirical, clever, kinetically experimental, serially engaging in spite of itself And completely caught up in its own desires to denial of any other readerly needs, which has its merits, even if the stuttering stop start repeat of the images here has a decidedly masturbatory quite literally aspect and associated outside boredome With some of the play with viewpoint and camera here the roving pan shot, the peepholes that unify disparate material this has a Robbe Grilletian aspect, but with a direct gay gaze that still seems daring only a decade after the censorship of Naked Lunch For all of this, and despite the Problems in evidence throughout the weird cultural artifact that is Burroughs, this might be his best

  5. Mel Mel says:

    William S Burroughs does not like women or at least he did not like his distopian fantasies to contain any flattering versions of them I would not expect a man who shot his wife in the head accidentally while trying to shoot a shot glass off her head while wasted I might add to have any use for women although it is said that he was deeply sorry and remorseful for having accidentally murdered his wife He even says so in his wild distopian world where women are eventually used as surrogate William S Burroughs does not like women or at least he did not like his distopian fantasies to contain any flattering versions of them I would not expect a man who shot his wife in the head accidentally while trying to shoot a shot glass off her head while wasted I might add to have any use for women although it is said that he was deeply sorry and remorseful for having accidentally murdered his wife He even says so in his wild distopian world where women are eventually used as surrogates to makewild boys and they have no need to even come remotely in contact with any awful women creatures from the time they are born That being said I still enjoy Burroughs writing It is engaging and creative and perverse in a way that only Burroughs can be This book is filled with pages and pages of raw sweaty gay male sex but is not without its own sensitivities , war, violence, decadence and drug references This is why I love Burroughs he just said things in a way no one else does and the fact that he does not want any women in his distopian fantasy world filled with young men who are filled with an isatiable lust for each other and a lust for violence really does not bother me one bit This is his fantasy world not mine and I am glad he wrote it down so I could get a glimpse into it We need books like this Books that scare and disgust people but at the same open your mind to a new way of thinking and writing

  6. tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE says:

    I used to think of this as the last of Burroughs 5 cut up novels It s probablyappropriate to think of it as the 1st of the homoerotic adventure novels Or something Anyway, it s great I read it when I was a research volunteer for a NASA study re space stn living No shit This was at the Phipps Clinic of Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Balti I was living in a simulated space stn environment for 15 days w 2 other guys It was mainly an experiment in behavior modification desi I used to think of this as the last of Burroughs 5 cut up novels It s probablyappropriate to think of it as the 1st of the homoerotic adventure novels Or something Anyway, it s great I read it when I was a research volunteer for a NASA study re space stn living No shit This was at the Phipps Clinic of Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Balti I was living in a simulated space stn environment for 15 days w 2 other guys It was mainly an experiment in behavior modification designed to produce routines that wd prevent astronauts from going crazy in a restricted environment I took The Wild Boys into the study w me particularly b c of its anti control theme After the study was over, I was interviewed by a reporter for the Johns Hopkins Magazine or some such I remember talking about Duchamp I probably sd a lotof things that were a bit too weird for Hopkins This wd ve been the 1st time I was ever interviewed The article was squelched perhaps this was an early instance of my being censored by the press The Wild Boys is probably Burroughs s clearest novelistic depicition of feral revolutionaries

  7. Anthony Anthony says:

    It is difficult to gauge this novel, the most confounding thing I have read in recent memory So, I want to reread this and readabout it, to better understand my own feelings But I think I love The Wild Boys.The book is a set of thinly connected vignettes, going as far back as the 1890s and as far forward as 1988, twenty years after the book was written It focuses mainly on the global rise of fascism in the West and of anarchy outside it after the world hits peak oil A good number of th It is difficult to gauge this novel, the most confounding thing I have read in recent memory So, I want to reread this and readabout it, to better understand my own feelings But I think I love The Wild Boys.The book is a set of thinly connected vignettes, going as far back as the 1890s and as far forward as 1988, twenty years after the book was written It focuses mainly on the global rise of fascism in the West and of anarchy outside it after the world hits peak oil A good number of the vignettes are dedicated to boys who, for whatever reason, have decided to leave conventional lives to dive into a world of freedom and sex with other boys The last quarter of the book is about a global phenomenon of wild boy gangs who plague dictatorships in their homelands, killing cops and soldiers with brutal efficiency by day and having ritual death resurrection orgies by night It is framed in a postmodern way almost to a fault, with drone cameras, fictionalization, and peep shows of the incomprehensible serving as recurring motifs In science fiction, observant writers are too often gets mistaken for being prescient But the themes of surveillance, collapse, and freedom in the chaos of a dying civilization, of never escaping the dynamic of watching and being watched, couldn t berelevant today Things were going to hell when this was written and they have not stopped It is also a unique and highly liberatory contribution to gay aesthetics it touched my spirit, the desire to be wild, to live in touch with your desires outside of straight categorization, to live outside the anxieties of the straight world, freedom from the emasculation and the evil of Western civilization It is a dream, a nightmare, a treasure

  8. Scott Scott says:

    This book is not for everyone probably not for most people It requires work and an understanding of what the Beat authors were trying to do andspecifically a grasp of Burroughs literary aims and personal story I recommend that those not familiar with Burroughs first read to the introduction to Queer Beats , edited by Regina Marler It does a nice job explaining the movement and giving a brief literary biography to Burroughs and related authors poets Marler also discusses the social This book is not for everyone probably not for most people It requires work and an understanding of what the Beat authors were trying to do andspecifically a grasp of Burroughs literary aims and personal story I recommend that those not familiar with Burroughs first read to the introduction to Queer Beats , edited by Regina Marler It does a nice job explaining the movement and giving a brief literary biography to Burroughs and related authors poets Marler also discusses the social and literary significance of the Beat movement.The Wild Boys has no coherent story That is not the way Burroughs writes It is a collection of cinematic fantasy scenes that are often visceral, pornographic, violent, surreal, brutal, beautiful, and disturbing Images and scenes double back and are retold or re imagined repeated Nothing is taboo Most of the sexual scenes are male on male, and since many come from Burroughs memory and fantasies, they involve under age boys and are very graphic and explicit Burroughs creates an anti conventional fantasy world a queer Neverland populated with anarchistic gay lost boys where he flips the bird to conventional s and ideals, using his mastery of language and imagery as a weapon and a paint brush I think that this is an amazing book and that Burroughs is a great author I suspect that most readers will think it is trash and pornography

  9. Andy Andy says:

    The thought of William S Burroughs is sometimes better than his actual fiction picture if you will a man who combines brilliant science fiction with National Geographic pictorials oftribes, no women, no men, just crazy insane boys who love to kill and jerk off combined with creaky old 1940 s boyish Fu Manchu pulp adventure crap The concept is pretty nuts but the execution is, well, almost as creaky and tiresome as Fu Manchu himself.

  10. Az Az says:

    He teaches me how to write And who could read better porn than The Frisco Kid

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