De bruiloft van Figaro PDF Ï De bruiloft Kindle -


De bruiloft van Figaro [PDF / Epub] ✅ De bruiloft van Figaro By Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais – Thomashillier.co.uk L ing nieux et spirituel Figaro se marie Ce grand jour est cependant assombri par le libertinage du comte Almaviva, qui d sire acheter les faveurs de sa fianc e avant la c r monie Go t de l intrigue e L ing nieux et spirituel Figaro se marie Ce grand jour est cependant assombri par le libertinage du comte Almaviva, qui d sire acheter les faveurs de sa fianc e avant De bruiloft Kindle - la c r monie Go t de l intrigue et mots d esprit ne seront pas de trop pour faire triompher la justice et l amour.

  • Paperback
  • 152 pages
  • De bruiloft van Figaro
  • Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais
  • Dutch
  • 05 May 2018
  • 9064031088 Edition Language Dutch Other Editions 128

About the Author: Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais

Pierre Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais was a French playwright, watchmaker, inventor, musician, diplomat, fugitive, spy, publisher, horticulturalist, arms dealer, satirist, financier, and revolutionary both French and AmericanBorn a provincial watchmaker s De bruiloft Kindle - son, Beaumarchais rose in French society and became influential in the court of Louis XV as an inventor and music teacher He made a number of important business and social contacts, played various roles as a diplomat and spy, and had earned a considerable fortune before a series of costly court battles jeopardized his reputationAn early French supporter of American independence, Beaumarchais lobbied the French government on behalf of the American rebels during the American War of Independence Beaumarchais oversaw covert aid from the French and Spanish governments to supply arms and financial assistance to the rebels in the years before France s formal entry into the war in He later struggled to recover money he had personally invested in the scheme Beaumarchais was also a participant in the early stages of the French Revolution He is probably best known, however, for his theatrical works, especially the three Figaro plays.



10 thoughts on “De bruiloft van Figaro

  1. Lisa Lisa says:

    Mon cavalier, r pondrez vous mes questions At the culmination of this brilliant play, written just a few years before the beginning of the French Revolution, the all powerful Comte de Almaviva challenges Figaro to answer his questions Figaro, superbly, retorts Eh Qui pourrait m en exempter, Monseigneur Vous commandez tout ici, hors vous m me That is the perfect definition of a tyrant being in command of everything, except for himself The play, which celebrates esprit and cunning Mon cavalier, r pondrez vous mes questions At the culmination of this brilliant play, written just a few years before the beginning of the French Revolution, the all powerful Comte de Almaviva challenges Figaro to answer his questions Figaro, superbly, retorts Eh Qui pourrait m en exempter, Monseigneur Vous commandez tout ici, hors vous m me That is the perfect definition of a tyrant being in command of everything, except for himself The play, which celebrates esprit and cunning intrigues to out manoeuvre the abuse of privilege and power, is probablywell known in its opera adaptation by Mozart But the original by Beaumarchais is well worth reading in its own right, displaying aacid political focus, which has proven to be relevant as a societal mirror over time, leading to its being forbidden by the Vichy r gime in the 1940s for example A late honour chapeau Beaumarchais I remember the first time I read it in a literature class at university My professor had a predilection for humorous enlightenment thinkers, and Figaro was a character he loved to quote Noblesse, fortune, un rang, des places, tout cela rend si fier Qu avez vous fait pour tant de biens Vous vous tes donn la peine de na tre, et rien de plus When he read those famous lines from Figaro s soliloquy, they stuck in students minds All the arrogance and ridicule of a privileged position were highlighted in the hilarious idea of Vous vous tes donn la peine de na tre, et rien de plus.Reading the play again, with a different focus now, the character of Figaro is still fascinating, but his companion, the intelligent young woman Suzanne, is evenstriking She is threatened by the institutionalised rape culture of the privileged class, fearing the Comte de Almaviva s droit de seigneur , which allows him to claim the first night with the bride, should she marry Figaro Not willing to submit to that cruel tradition, the plot develops around the various steps to be taken in order to outwit the power of the Comte Add some confusion over identities, parental relationships, adultery and tricks, and you have the perfect 18th century play in a nutshell.Just like Leontes in The Winter s Tale, Almaviva is rehabilitated in the end, reconciled with his wife, not opposing Figaro and Suzanne any J ai voulu ruser avec eux ils m ont trait comme un enfant Oh, the luxury of a dictator who is able to detect his own childlike foolishness The cheerful ending does not weaken the serious arguments raised in the play, however, as they are repeated in a final song, sung by different characters taking turns The ideas of injustice and power abuse are accentuated and discussed, reflecting on the topics in the preceding action Beaumarchais Suzanne sings out loudly what Shakespeare s women hinted at implicitly Qu un mari sa foi trahisse Il s en vante et chacun rit Que sa femme ait un caprice,S il l accuse on la punit.De cette absurde injusticeFaut il dire le pourquoi Les plus forts ont fait la loi The inequality between men and women plainly called cette absurde injustice , Figaro s monologue denouncing the privileges of the nobility, a side discourse on the role of the child born out of wedlock all these themes show the groundbreaking modernity of Beaumarchais political vision put on stage for wide reception In pre social media times, the theatre held an important role in spreading ideas With Figaro praising wit l esprit as the way to change an unjust, unequal society, he sets the task for centuries to come Par le sort de la naissance,L un est roi, l autre est berger Le hasard fit leur distance L esprit seul peut tout changer.De vingt rois que l en encense,Le tr pas brise l autel,Et Voltaire est immortel As Figaro closes with Voltaire, I will join him with the philosopher s famous quote against intolerance crasez l inf me Celebrating l esprit of 18th century Enlightenment thinkers, light spreads Fiat lux

  2. Anastasia Anastasia says:

    Read for class.Wow, I ve actually enjoyed it The characters were amazing, and this is exactly the type of comedy I love It actually made me chuckle a couple of times.Plus, Suzanne was fucking great and had some of the best comebacks And was a little bit feminist ish Sort of In a way Figaro was also cunning and funny, so I appreciated him a lot Overall, very glad I haven t decided to skip this one.

  3. Pauline Van etc. Pauline Van etc. says:

    I read Beaumarchais play since I recently discovered that it was a big hit in 1784 prior to the French Revolution Louis the XVI hated it and Danton and Napol on praised it The story is about Figaro, a valet who will soon get married to a maid The Count for which they both work wants to exercice his Droit du seigneur , a supposed medieval right allowing lords to have sexual relations with subordinate women on their wedding nights While historians are not sure this Droit du seigneur re I read Beaumarchais play since I recently discovered that it was a big hit in 1784 prior to the French Revolution Louis the XVI hated it and Danton and Napol on praised it The story is about Figaro, a valet who will soon get married to a maid The Count for which they both work wants to exercice his Droit du seigneur , a supposed medieval right allowing lords to have sexual relations with subordinate women on their wedding nights While historians are not sure this Droit du seigneur really existed at that time, the entitlement of the lords was real The play acted as a catalyst for change and freedom from the unfair power of the feudal lords and the monarchy What is particularly interesting in Le Mariage de Figaro is the rendition of the context of pre revolutionary France You can really feel the Enlightenment ideas floating around Without the freedom to criticise, there is no true praise and the insolent and at once brillant wordsmith of Beaumarchais reflecting the desire for political change It has some good quotes as well about the unfairness against women treated as children for our assets, punished as adults for our faults A nice and easy play to delve into revolutionary France

  4. Armyn Armyn says:

    I had to read this book for my European Humanities class ,and I m so glad my professor assigned it This book was hilarious I wondered why my professor assigned the class the second book in the series but the book was easily understandable It was easy to find out what happened in the previous book The story is like a Twelfth Nights mixed with Midsummer Nights Dream It was very entertaining.The only reason why I gave it 4 stars is because it felt a little rush at the end and I didn t really l I had to read this book for my European Humanities class ,and I m so glad my professor assigned it This book was hilarious I wondered why my professor assigned the class the second book in the series but the book was easily understandable It was easy to find out what happened in the previous book The story is like a Twelfth Nights mixed with Midsummer Nights Dream It was very entertaining.The only reason why I gave it 4 stars is because it felt a little rush at the end and I didn t really like the connection they made between Figaro and Marceline It felt as if the author took an easy way out, but overall it was still enjoyable

  5. Anna Groover Anna Groover says:

    Read this for my French lit class about dangerous women Not sure I picked up on all the nuances of the play, but I enjoyed it nevertheless The last act is particularly fun because all of the women basically get together and say all right, we re tired of this crap and manipulate the men into doing what they want them to do.

  6. Bruce Bruce says:

    Ready for production in 1778, the French censors and King Louis XVI prevented the staging of this play by Beaumarchais until six years later, largely because of its political radicalism Many contemporary and subsequent critics have attributed to the play an important precipitating factor in the French Revolution, although in retrospect it may have beena reflection of emerging anti aristocratic sentiment than its cause Mozart s opera of the same title was based on it and was produced in 1 Ready for production in 1778, the French censors and King Louis XVI prevented the staging of this play by Beaumarchais until six years later, largely because of its political radicalism Many contemporary and subsequent critics have attributed to the play an important precipitating factor in the French Revolution, although in retrospect it may have beena reflection of emerging anti aristocratic sentiment than its cause Mozart s opera of the same title was based on it and was produced in 1786 Lorenzo Da Ponte, Mozart s librettist, rewrote Beaumarchais play, eliminating Figaro s long rant at the end against the nobility and replacing it with an aria against unfaithful wives Thus the political invective that made the play so toxic in Paris was not an issue when Mozart s opera was performed in Vienna, although its licentiousness was.The characters in this work are well drawn and highly individual, the plot is delightfully convoluted, and the dialogue is scintillating Woven into the story are issues of marital infidelity and seigniorial rights, aristocratic privilege and class cunning, masculine demands and feminine wiles Women and the underclass win the day, to the discomfiture and ridicule of the male upper class Both Beaumarchais play and Mozart s opera are highly entertaining and socially critical it is easy to see how the powers that be of the time would be offended and made uncomfortable.The play was the second in a related series of three by Beaumarchais, the first having been The Barber of Seville and the third The Guilty Mother

  7. Dorian Jandreau Dorian Jandreau says:

    I was looking for this book in my country very long I finally found it and ordered immediately, because first time I got known to this story was Russian musical with my favorite singer Philip Kirkorov He played Count Almaviva Since that New Year night when I saw that musical, I got obssesed with this story And I started reading this book in Lithuanian after so many years after that musical s premiere on TV And I love this book Drama, intrigues, jokes, passion everything I love I so love I was looking for this book in my country very long I finally found it and ordered immediately, because first time I got known to this story was Russian musical with my favorite singer Philip Kirkorov He played Count Almaviva Since that New Year night when I saw that musical, I got obssesed with this story And I started reading this book in Lithuanian after so many years after that musical s premiere on TV And I love this book Drama, intrigues, jokes, passion everything I love I so love passionate dramas full of jealousy, love, missing parents and wegginds It is a story of times when I wish I could live But, unfortunately, I cannot return back in time That s how I imagine 18th century, just like in this book Count Almaviva of course is my favorite Just like me jealous, furious and unfaithful He is my favorite character in the play And, of course, because of that Russian musical My favorite singer played his role perfectly In fact all these Russian singers and actors made the best show ever created by this book They played all the characters just like the author showed them in this book I feel so happy I read this play finally after so many years It was so entertaining and it gave me so much feelings and joy

  8. Marc Marc says:

    This is a crazy and sparkling comedy, a form of absurd theatre in a way a precursor of Beckett and Pirandello Figaro is the master schemer here, but he s not master of the plot at all all his plans and tricks fail He hasthe allure of Sancho Pancha, Don Quichote s loyal servant I was struck by the remarkable role of the female characters they take over the intrigue The moral of the story has a distinct social flavour money will replace birth as the foundation of power no wonder th This is a crazy and sparkling comedy, a form of absurd theatre in a way a precursor of Beckett and Pirandello Figaro is the master schemer here, but he s not master of the plot at all all his plans and tricks fail He hasthe allure of Sancho Pancha, Don Quichote s loyal servant I was struck by the remarkable role of the female characters they take over the intrigue The moral of the story has a distinct social flavour money will replace birth as the foundation of power no wonder this was written in the 18th century, the time of the upcoming bourgeoisie

  9. Alex Alex says:

    I am stealing this description from anger, joy, compassion, jealousy, love, and sexual passion From the I am stealing this description from Daponte s Operatic Mythology A Gaggle of Gods and GoddessesBy Roger CantrellWhen Lorenzo Da Ponte wrote the Italian libretto for Le Nozze di Figaro , he must have immediately seen the fascinating parallels between the lives of the characters in Beaumarchis play and those of classic mythology The emotions the characters portray are timeless anger, joy, compassion, jealousy, love, and sexual passion From the ancient authors, Sophocles, Homer and Virgil come stories, which have resonated with these same emotions throughout the ages Da Ponte adds to his libretto the spice of ancient times and the singers, coaches, conductors and stage directors of today will find themselves assaulted by a whole gaggle of gods, goddesses, and archaic symbols wittily woven into the text of Mozart s opera For in spite of the popularity of Xena, Warrior Princess , the middle names of the pop group N Sync arelikely to be known than even the most common names of the Greek pantheon So let us journey back in time to a day when gods and goddesses roamed the earth to learn who and what their stories are and what they mean to the 21st century performer interpreting the libretto of Da Ponte and music of Mozart.Act IThe search begins in No.5 the duettino between Susanna and Marcellina In the gamesmanship of trying to top each other, with a few well chosen insults, Marcellina finally erupts with the phrase Per Bacco precipito, which literally means By Bacchus I explode Bacchus is the Roman name for the Greek god Dionysus Bacchus or Dionysus was fathered by Zeus and the mortal woman Semele Hera, the jealous wife of Zeus, tricked the pregnant Semele into persuading the expectant papa to reveal himself to her in his true god like form Semele was destroyed or exploded by the sight of Zeus in all his godly glory Marcellina is inferring that Susanna, the evil manifestation of Hera , will trick her into exploding by her thinly disguised barbs about her age and thus get her goat which itself is one of the animal symbols of Bacchus Susanna in her aside also has a mythological reference She calls Marcellina Sibilla which is the name of the Sibyls These were women consulted as oracles by the ancient Romans and Greeks Her words of prophecy were usually tricky and often obscure to the person involved and one had to be on guard against being fooled by the oracle The name is also synonymous with our word witch In No.7 Terzetto, after the Count has discovered Cherubino hiding in a chair, a fearful Susanna says giusti Dei Literally Just Gods This plural invocation calls upon Zeus and his brother Poseidon Zeus, the sky god, is the carrier of justice and judgment Poseidon also carries something of the same character as Zeus with the exception that his authority comes from below as lord of the sea From Zeus with his penchant for extra marital peccadilloes, Susanna seeks a sympathetic heavenly intercession for being caught in a situation that would seemingly undermine her credibility as an honest woman Poseidon has control over those events in life that are beyond the control of mortal men such as earthquakes, tidal waves, and clever little page boys who make bad situations worse requiring divine intervention to untangle the mess At the end of the recitative following this terzetto the Count calls Cherubino picciol serpente after realizing that the boy, while hidden, has heard the whole of his conversation with Susanna The phrase means little serpent The serpent is of course the tempter of Eve in the Garden of Eden The Count believes that Cherubino has tried to tempt Susanna in the same garden he wished to create for his own conquest From the pychological point of view, the serpent also symbolizes the emotional entanglements with which the little serpent has entwined himself creating a muchdangerously complicated situation than the simple seduction of a pretty servant The finale of Act I is Figaro s aria Non piu andrai Since this aria is directed at Cherubino, the time has come take a look at his name and the description titles Figaro gives him during the aria Cherubino, whose true name is Leon de Astorga, has the dubious honor of being called little Cherub The cherubs were known as the naked winged babies in renaissance art who were also known as atti , little loves They were the descendants of the Roman god of erotic love known as Cupid or the Hindu god, Kama Beaumarchais, the author of the play upon which Da Ponte based his libretto, wrote that at the bottom of Cherubino s character is the vague, restless desire of adolescence in full hormonal attack Each of the arrows of Kama, the Hindu god of erotic love, has a name such as Death bringing Agony and Open Up Perhaps, Beaumarchais is suggesting that Cherubino has an arsenal of arrows that will open up the love lives of the women in the castle In the aria, Figaro first calls Cherubino farfallone which has two meanings 1 a philanderer 2 a big butterfly which is appropriate since Cherubino has been constantly flitting around the beauties of the castle night and day disturbing their rest Figaro next calls him Narcisetto meaning little Narcissus Narcissus was the youth drowned in the pool of water from which he was constantly admiring himself Thus, he became the symbol of vanity, selfishness, self love, and self satisfaction The next name he calls him is Adocino signifying Little Adonis Adonis was the young lover of Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty Adonis was killed by a boar one day while hunting In some myths this boar was the god Ares, who was also a lover of Aphrodite I believe this reference is very much pointed toward the Count as Adonis and Figaro as Ares, disguised as a boar Da Ponte s libretto does not actually indicate the exit of the Count and Basilio until the end of Figaro s aria Therefore a dramatic case can be made that Figaro s name calling is equally directed if notat the Count as well as Cherubino When Figaro begins to tell Cherubino about his future military life among the soldiers, he exclaims poffar Bacco Another Bacchus reference this time concerning the play of Euripides The Bacchae In the play, Bacchus or Dionysus comes to Thebes as the instrument of change that will destroy the status quo of the King and his kingdom Figaro now casts himself in a war fighting to bring change into society while the Count tries to keep business as usual.Act IIAfter Susanna s aria Venite inginocchiatevi Susanna calls Cherubino Serpentello meaning little Serpent I would refer the reader to the previous explanation and history of serpent in Act I Needless to say, Cherubino has continued to exude his adolescent sexual magic on the two women forcing Susanna to acknowledge its seductive power At the end of Cherubino and Susanna s duettino, Aprite, presto aprite , Susanna addresses her nervous concerns to the pagan gods Oh Dei as Cherubino is about to leap from the second floor window of the castle to escape the discovery and impending wrath of the Count She continues with a sigh of relief at Cherubino s safe leap from the window and calls him demonietto little demon She is amazed at his speedy use of the devilish powers he seems to possess The finale to Act II contains references to giusto ciel , giusti Dei , and other various divinities All of which are indicative of the belief that some unseen hand must be in charge of the events of this crazy day.Act IIIThere is a very interesting reference in the beautiful duettino sull aria between Susanna and the Countess It occurs in the word zeffiretto meaning little breeze A zephyr or breeze comes from the Greek god Zephyrus who was the god of the West wind Symbolically the wind represents change and the wind coming from the west signifies the realm of death The death of errant behaviors and the return of husbandly love will be brought about by the West wind wafting sotto i pini under the pine trees The pine s phallic shape is a symbol of masculine sexuality Here, Da Ponte changed the tree type from Beaumarchais original chestnut trees to the muchsexually charged pines Although, I must admit there s something about those chestnuts of Beaumarchais that makes my mouth water Act III Finale.At the end of the dance during the wedding celebration, Figaro observes that the Count has received a note, which he assumes, by the Count s reaction, is a billet doux from a lady During the Count s pantomime with the note, Figaro ironically comments to Susanna previously forbidden by the Countess to tell Figaro about the plan for fear of him gumming up the whole works again about the Count s encounter with the note and the pin used to seal it Finally, Figaro says what a Narcissus Il Narciso the Count is I refer the reader to Figaro s Act I aria Non piu andrai for the meaning of Narcissus Narcisetto Act IVAt this point in the opera, Figaro mistakenly believes that Susanna has arranged a lover s rendezvous with the Count in the garden Figaro, while waiting to take his revenge in the name of all husbands, sings the aria Aprite un po quegl occhi, open your eyes, guys He warns all men not to believe in the trustworthiness of women He calls them witches who cast spells on men to make them suffer, and sirene sirens singing their seductive songs to make men cast themselves into the sea and drown This nautical reference is about one of the most famous epics in all mythology The Odyssey written by the Greek poet Homer The adventure concerns Odysseus Roman name Ulysses in his long quest to return home after the Trojan War One of the episodes in the epic concerns the aforementioned sirens Odysseus has been warned by the blind prophet Teiresias to beware of the island of the two sirens Their singing was so sweetly seductive that any man hearing their song would be drawn to island s rocky shore and killed Odysseus was told to plug the ears of his men with wax in order to avoid being lured to their death Unfortunately, Figaro has already heard the deceptive song of Susanna and has been thrown into a sea of dark despair While floundering off the island of the Sirens, Figaro flings a couplemythic stones at women son orse benigne, colombe maligne they are gentle she bears, malignant doves The she bear is the symbol of the goddess Artemis called Diana by the Romans which was one of her incarnations And since there is no such thing as a gentle she bear , Figaro compares himself to Actaeon who while hunting got caught watching the naked goddess bathing and was torn apart by his dogs The malignant doves are the totem of the mighty, flighty Aphrodite, and are the birds of sexual passion Act IV FinaleDuring the finale, which is a conundrum of mistaken identities, the Countess pretends to be Susanna A self deceived Figaro overhears the Count call Susanna Venere Venus This sets the stage for the final mythological odyssey of Lorenzo Da Ponte A few pages later after the exit of the Count and Susanna Countess, Figaro says entro la bella Venere col vago Marte prendere nuovo Vulcan del secolo in rete la potro the beautiful Venus has gone in with the handsome Mars as the new Vulcan of the century, I will catch her in my net Venus was the wife of Vulcan, the lame Smith god Unfortunately, Venus stayed too late in the arms of her lover, Mars, one fine summer night, and was seen by her hubby Vulcan Enraged, Vulcan beat a hasty retreat to his blacksmith shop and made an bronze hunting net, as delicate as silk but totally unbreakable which he secretly attached to the post and sides of his wedding bed I m sure the wedding bed irony was not lost on Figaro who began this opera measuring the room given to them by the Count for their wedding bed Vulcan told Venus he needed a night out with the boys and that he was off to Corinth As soon as he was out of sight, Venus paged Mars which probably interrupted a quiet moment during a performance at the local amphitheater , who quickly joined his lover for some good ole fashioned nooky At dawn, they discovered they were hopelessly entangled in Vulcan s bronze net Vulcan surprising them, called all the gods to bear witness to the shameless couple ensnared in his bed.This myth surely echoes Figaro s own plans for his unfaithful wife and the Count, by calling all the people of the castle to witness their treachery and shaming them in front of all For the artist and audience engaged in the live or recorded experience of Mozart s Le Nozze di Figaro , understanding Da Ponte s ironical interweaving of mythic echoes of the classic past bring an enhanced enjoyment and depth I have a suspicion that the residents of Mount Olympus would also be amused by their contribution

  10. Maan Kawas Maan Kawas says:

    A very beautiful play by the French playwright Beaumarchais, considered as a sequel to his first play The Barber of Seville , which has an underlying message Though the play is filled with funny situations, it indirectly conveys a criticism to the social system, namely, the aristocracy, and its authority political and military power We can see Figaro and the Count compete for Suzanne, Figaro wants to marry her, while the Count wants to trifle with her before her wedding However, the play i A very beautiful play by the French playwright Beaumarchais, considered as a sequel to his first play The Barber of Seville , which has an underlying message Though the play is filled with funny situations, it indirectly conveys a criticism to the social system, namely, the aristocracy, and its authority political and military power We can see Figaro and the Count compete for Suzanne, Figaro wants to marry her, while the Count wants to trifle with her before her wedding However, the play is light and filled with wittiness, funny plots, misunderstanding and its consequences, different types of love, unexpected coincidences e.g Figaro s real parents , jealousy, and forgiveness Some of the points the play may address may include the privilege of the aristocratic authority, which Beaumarchais criticizes, the various motives for love, marriage, marital commitment, faithfulness, the power of thinking in finding quick and effective solutions, the importance of virtue and marital fidelity It is not surprising that, with its underlying message regarding the aristocracy, King Louis XVI was shocked by it and forbade its publication before its revision by Beaumarchais I enjoyed the play, and I wanted to read it because it was the source for Mozart s opera Le Nozze di Figaro

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