The House of Rumour: A Novel PDF è The House


The House of Rumour: A Novel [Download] ➺ The House of Rumour: A Novel ➿ Jake Arnott – Thomashillier.co.uk Jake Arnott s decade spanning, continent hopping novel mixes fascinating real life figures with fictional characters as it moves briskly from WWII spy intrigue featuring Ian Fleming and occultism Alei Jake Arnott s decade of Rumour: ePUB ↠ spanning, continent hopping novel mixes fascinating real life figures with fictional characters as it moves briskly from WWII The House PDF/EPUB ² spy intrigue featuring Ian Fleming and occultism Aleister Crowley to the West Coast pulp science fiction set Philip K Dick, Robert A Heinlein House of Rumour: PDF/EPUB ✓ even L Ron Hubbard and the s UK new wave music scene Larry Zagorski, a SF writer turned US fighter pilot, searches for connections between what seem like disparate events while conspiracy theories begin to suggest the possibility of a single force behind them.

    The House of Rumour: A Novel PDF è The House connections between what seem like disparate events while conspiracy theories begin to suggest the possibility of a single force behind them."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 448 pages
  • The House of Rumour: A Novel
  • Jake Arnott
  • English
  • 12 September 2019
  • 0544077792

About the Author: Jake Arnott

Jake Arnott is a of Rumour: ePUB ↠ British novelist, author of The Long Firm and four other novels In Arnott was ranked one of The House PDF/EPUB ² Britain s most influential gay and lesbian people When he was included in a list of the fifty most influential gay men House of Rumour: PDF/EPUB ✓ in Britain in , it was declared that he was widely regarded as one of Britain s most promising novelists.



10 thoughts on “The House of Rumour: A Novel

  1. Sam Quixote Sam Quixote says:

    The House of Rumour is Jake Arnott s tour of 20th century curios taking in some of its most defining moments and including some of its most interesting and notorious individuals Reality and fiction blur as created characters mix with real people, and events have a habit of connecting to other events with tenuous links jonbar points , to use sci fi vernacular A classified paper detailing a secret government operation in World War 2 to use black magic and astrology to lure Hitler s second i The House of Rumour is Jake Arnott s tour of 20th century curios taking in some of its most defining moments and including some of its most interesting and notorious individuals Reality and fiction blur as created characters mix with real people, and events have a habit of connecting to other events with tenuous links jonbar points , to use sci fi vernacular A classified paper detailing a secret government operation in World War 2 to use black magic and astrology to lure Hitler s second in command, Rudolf Hess, to leave Germany for Scotland is stolen by a transvestite prostitute in late 80s England from a retired spymaster From there Arnott sends the reader back to the dark year of 1941 where the war was firmly in favour of the Nazis and a young Ian Fleming, commander in Naval Intelligence, utilised his contacts to arrange a meeting with Aleister Crowley, once known as the wickedest man in the world Crowley agrees to Fleming s bizarre plan or is this disinformation to hold magical gatherings to lure Hess to Britain, sending word to his cult centre in California to do the same And so on to California where we meet a young fictional author, Larry Zagorski, who is introduced to Robert Heinlein and his Manana Society where he meets L Ron Hubbard and Jack Parsons I won t go into the various strands of the story because there are too many to list but they include the Nuremberg Trials, the Cold War, the Cuban Revolution, Jim Jones Peoples Temple, UFO conspiracies, and culminating in space with the Voyager 1 probe Jake Arnott has written some tremendous books so far in his career but The House of Rumour is his best yet and definitely his most ambitious It is structured in the style of tarot cards with 21 chapters each named after a face card The Hanged Man , The Hierophant , The Female Pope , etc with each chapter told from the perspective of the rich and varied cast of characters It s a beautifully written novel full of fascinating people and events I loved the parts in the 40s highlighting the Golden Age of science fiction and reading about the exploits of Jack Parsons a rocket scientist who would die in mysterious circumstances and L Ron Hubbard who would go on to found the controversial religion Scientology , Arnott captures the spirit of the age showing the naivety and excitement of the times The communes and free love read like the 60s but this was the 40s, a time that wasn t as innocent as some would make out Across the pond, the Ian Fleming chapters were my favourite You get a great sense of the man he was and how frustrated he was that he wasn t the suave, manly character he wanted to be In a particularly funny section he saves a Moneypenny like colleague from an assassin in a bungling way before sitting awkwardly with her afterward, cursing that he hadn t the courage to take her to bed immediately after killing the assassin He thinks that one day, with words, he will make this right Years later after his Bond novels have made him rich and famous, he gives a clue as to the meaning of this novel The House of Rumour At the centre of the world where everything can be seen is a tower of sounding bronze that hums and echoes, repeating all it hears, mixing truth with fiction p.244 The House of Rumour is deception and counter intelligence disinformation fed to the enemy And that s what this book is full of deception A transvetite who looks like a woman but is a man a troubled female David Bowie groupie becomes a man a writer whose life influenced his fiction Fleming and a writer whose fiction influenced his life Hubbard a prescient novel called Swastika Night allegedly written by a man is revealed to have been written by a woman this is real novel and a fictional writer, Zagorski, writes a novel with each chapter named after a face card in the tarot The novel talks about utopias and dystopias and is full of examples the Cuban Revolution which tried to create a socialist paradise before becoming a bankrupt third world country Jim Jones Peoples Temple which promised paradise on earth but ended in mass suicide Each character is looking for truth in their own way but what is true in this twisting hall of mirrors story There is so much about this novel I enjoyed but this review is already too long to talk about them I will say that a number of reviews have said this novel has no plot as if this is a critique against it I agree that the book has no plot but disagree that this is a bad thing When a novel is this entertaining, where each chapter takes you into another fascinating life, bringing colour to episodes in history previously unexplored where else will you get such a description of what Hess must have felt inside the cockpit of the plane as he prepared to parachute out over the Scottish Highlands , who cares that there s no plot Does a novel always have to have a plot to be considered good I think The House of Rumour proves resoundingly that it doesn t The House of Rumour is a wildly ambitious, perfectly executed novel full of secrets, conspiracies, anecdotes featuring the occult, and a veritable cast of anti heroes and oddballs that spans both space and time, layering the novel in meaning and dead ends It s a novel that s thrilling to read but also contains so much that it invites repeated readings and no guarantees that there are answers to it at the end Jake Arnott has created in The House of Rumour a mesmerising, meditative, and vexing story whose secrets always seem within reach to the reader but always just out of reach too It s an amazing accomplishment and a masterpiece The House of Rumour is definitely my favourite novel of 2012 Bravo, Mr Arnott

  2. Gram Gram says:

    An ambitious tale of misinformation and disinformation there is a difference which centres on the solo flight of Hitler s second in command, Rudolf Hess to Britain in 1941 Hess alleged reason for this was a bid to make a separate peace with Britain, allowing Nazi Germany to concentrate all its efforts on the invasion of the Soviet Union Around this, Jake Arnott spins a conspiracy story which features famous characters from the past, such as Ian Fleming writer of James Bond books and the n An ambitious tale of misinformation and disinformation there is a difference which centres on the solo flight of Hitler s second in command, Rudolf Hess to Britain in 1941 Hess alleged reason for this was a bid to make a separate peace with Britain, allowing Nazi Germany to concentrate all its efforts on the invasion of the Soviet Union Around this, Jake Arnott spins a conspiracy story which features famous characters from the past, such as Ian Fleming writer of James Bond books and the notorious Aleister Crowley, who at the behest of Fleming, then a British naval intelligence officer supposedly set up magical gatherings in Britain and the USA to direct black propaganda into Nazi Germany, seemingly aimed at senior Nazis such as Hess, who was, to say the least, delusional and open to suggestion.The story unravels in a series of sometimes seemingly unrelated chapters to include the Golden Age of sci fi featuring a fictional author, Larry Zagorksi as well as several real writers, such as Robert Heinlein and his Manana Literary Society where Zagorski meets, among others, L Ron Hubbard and Jack Parsons a rocket scientist whose death was considered by many to be mysterious There follow details about a secret document written about the Hess flight and peace plan, the invasion of the Soviet Union and the subsequent fall of Nazi Germany, followed by the Nuremberg Trials, Hess imprisonment until his suicide in 1987, the Cold War, the Cuban Revolution, Jim Jones Peoples Temple and the Jonestown Massacre, UFO conspiracies and , culminating in space with the Voyager 1 probe Dotted among these chapters are the stories of some colourful individuals from all walks of life spies, transvestites, musicians, writers, artists, revolutionaries, magicians and charlatans It s a rich, heady mixture which works well in some places and fails in others I found a few chapters to be dry or downright boring, but overall, it s an enjoyable read

  3. Archie Valparaiso Archie Valparaiso says:

    Why this wasn t longlisted for the Booker Prize perhaps tells you all you need to know about the Booker longlist Unconventionally structured, in that the plot is overarching, built up through several cross chapter strands, with characters ranging from the real including Ian Fleming on the slide in Jamaica, L Ron Hubbard on the tap in the Valley, Rudolf Hess on the lam in the Scottish highlands, Jim Jones on the Kool Aid in Guyana, the eighties Soho tranny socialite Vicky de Lambray on the mak Why this wasn t longlisted for the Booker Prize perhaps tells you all you need to know about the Booker longlist Unconventionally structured, in that the plot is overarching, built up through several cross chapter strands, with characters ranging from the real including Ian Fleming on the slide in Jamaica, L Ron Hubbard on the tap in the Valley, Rudolf Hess on the lam in the Scottish highlands, Jim Jones on the Kool Aid in Guyana, the eighties Soho tranny socialite Vicky de Lambray on the make in Shepherd Market you know people like that to the invented but fully convincing hero of sorts a Californian golden age SF writer called, wonderfully plausibly, Larry Zagorski The writing is quite spectacular, with deft switches of style between chapters, periods and locations brought off in a way that issubtle and convincing than in, for example, the for me overpraised Cloud Atlas At first sight, this may look like an experiment in genre fiction the author is best known for his earlier gritty gay noir novels but the writing isaccomplished and the themesprofound than much alleged straight no pun intended literary fiction Just call it contemporary fiction at its most convincing, spectacular and quite an achievement given its patchwork structure emotionally moving I expect this to be my only five star score on Goodreads for quite some time

  4. Tony Tony says:

    How I love this book I ve never read Jake Arnott before, thinking he might be a superior form of a pulp writer, judging by the subject matter of many of his previous books I was amazed then, how literate and elegant the book is The individual strands hold up on their own as mini character studies, but written with a clarity and flow that are quite intoxicating No word is out of place, even the most bizarre plot developments seem to have logical consistency, there is beauty, warmth and sadnes How I love this book I ve never read Jake Arnott before, thinking he might be a superior form of a pulp writer, judging by the subject matter of many of his previous books I was amazed then, how literate and elegant the book is The individual strands hold up on their own as mini character studies, but written with a clarity and flow that are quite intoxicating No word is out of place, even the most bizarre plot developments seem to have logical consistency, there is beauty, warmth and sadness in equal measure It could be said that the book is about the 20th C obsession with conspiracy, disinformation, and the strange paranoias that can affect almost entire nations, but in the end, it is the individual voices you remember, and Larry s last thoughts, looking back on a long life But then I ve already had my future, in my work and my imagination moved me enormously The world is a speculative fiction , he adds In Mr Arnott s hands one looks forward eagerly to what that world will bring

  5. Cynthia Cynthia says:

    Fact vs Fiction House of Rumour is laid out in chapters that correspond to the Tarot s major arcana from The Fool through The World Almost anyone important who played a role in World War II has a least a cameo appearance It is replete with real people like the Bond book author Ian Fleming including the real life handler M and M s girl Friday Miss Moneypenny That s on one side of the Atlantic The action in the US takes place in pre and post World War II California among science fiction writ Fact vs Fiction House of Rumour is laid out in chapters that correspond to the Tarot s major arcana from The Fool through The World Almost anyone important who played a role in World War II has a least a cameo appearance It is replete with real people like the Bond book author Ian Fleming including the real life handler M and M s girl Friday Miss Moneypenny That s on one side of the Atlantic The action in the US takes place in pre and post World War II California among science fiction writers and Hollywood The Author Heinlein is among the elite as is L.Ron Hubard when he was simply a hack writer rather than a cult leader Arnott mixes together real and imagined people so much so that I found myself googling names I didn t recognize He actually creates some originals to mix in with the known characters One intriguing plot device was the legend of Rudolf Hess s 1941 flight to Scotland where he attempted to negotiate peace between England and Germany The actual main character in the book is Rumour itself and how it was used to preserve the different countries ideology Arnott defines rumour as a blend between the truth and disinformation it s whatever serves the creators needs.Arnott explores how what we choose to believe defines us Of course rumour is used to manipulate others but it manipulates those who use it as well This is the true genius of this book In my opinion the flaw of this book is in how he forced himself to bend his story around the Tarot theme It feels disjointed at times though in others it s fascinating The blend of real and imagined characters kept me guessing and trying to work out the truth I m sure this was Arnott s intention but it also distracted me and took me out of the story I m on the fence between rating House of Rumour a three or a four star book For now I m going with three stars but that might change as I continue to think about the book There were sections that were riveting and others that were dry It felt like he boxed himself in too much by trying to fit the story too strictly to his set use of the Tarot

  6. Mark Mark says:

    This one s a bit of a surprise a non genre author better known for his tales of homosexuals, contemporary gangsters and seventies pop culture, a Brit who gave rise to the term geezer chic , turns in an ambitious piece of genre fiction that cleverly blends facts with fiction Result an occasionally brilliant novel.From the outset it s a combination of disparate ideas that really shouldn t work together Golden Age pulp SF writers, James Bond author Ian Fleming, German deputy Nazi Rudolf Hess, This one s a bit of a surprise a non genre author better known for his tales of homosexuals, contemporary gangsters and seventies pop culture, a Brit who gave rise to the term geezer chic , turns in an ambitious piece of genre fiction that cleverly blends facts with fiction Result an occasionally brilliant novel.From the outset it s a combination of disparate ideas that really shouldn t work together Golden Age pulp SF writers, James Bond author Ian Fleming, German deputy Nazi Rudolf Hess, the British government of 1941, UFO s, the Space Race, Tarot Cards and Satanism is not a combination you would normally think of Indeed, it rather seems like some sort of manic miscellany.Despite this, the tale is literate, engaging and, most importantly, just the right side of plausibility The book s tale is begun with a narrative from Larry Zagorsky, an fictional SF writer of the 1940 s and 50 s This was my initial surprise Arnott creates such an evocative picture of the SF fan scene of that time that I was immediately reminded of the early days of the Futurians on the US East Coast and,importantly, the West Coast compatriots of Heinlein, Sprague de Camp, Cartmill and their associates Zagorsky soon spends time amongst the West Coast fraternity and comments on their meetings In the wrong hands this tale could be told just for laughs, with a sneer at the fledgling fan group In reality it s handled with humour, yet there is a love and respect given here suggesting the sense of wonder created by such well intentioned chinwag sessions is maintained without making the lead figures ones of ridicule.As the story progresses we get a variety of different characters and we are told of events shown from different viewpoints In the present, Zagorsky is given details of a mysterious file that suggests that Hess s defection to Scotland in the Second World War was possibly connected to the consequences of an occult temple service in the US in 1941 The story then goes back to the 1940 s and 50 s and tells of members of that meeting, which includes many SF filmmakers and writers whom Zagorsky knows Jack Parsons, one of the founders of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory JPL was not only a scientist and avid SF reader, with many connections in the genre, but also an active member of a Satanist cult who, in this story, is encouraged to perform strange deviant acts in order to encourage the world s race into space As flying saucers are first reported and Sputnik launches into space, UFO cults and space based religions occur in the late 1940 s and 50 s as part of this global hysteria Many of these people known by Zagorsky become involved in the move to the SF genre beingmainstream and B movie film making Mixing non genre people such as Zagorsky with others, such as Intelligence Officer and James Bond author Ian Fleming, Nazi deputy Rudolf Hess, not to mention a minor visit from Aleister Crowley also in Arnott s previous novel, The Devil s Paintbrush with Arnott s fictional characters is an inspired decision Though many of these real people are cameos, they help create a factional world that allows the reader to imagine what if I understand it wouldn t be an Arnott novel unless there were some unusual events and characters, and this is quite true here we have sado masochism, sex orgies, transvestitism, gender realignment written in a time when such things were uncommon , and a smattering of homosexual relationships. it s a secret world that existed beneath the veneer of straight laced Britain, Germany and the USA in the 1950 s and probably miles away from the real one However, this culturally fertile environment, despite being filled with lots of brilliant moments, crucially fails to gel into a cohesive plot Whilst illuminating bizarre cults and conspiracies, as well as the secretive world of espionage and the environment of the fledgling genre writer, in the end it all becomes a tale of style over substance There are a number of separately interesting plot strands that on their own keep the reader entertained However, despite a great setup, at the end I was left feeling unsure what the actual point was The great reveal seems to be less important than the way the disparate threads converge and diverge Perhaps this is the Great Secret , that only acolytes of occultists like Crowley can understand.Paranoid conspiracy theorists will love this book Rather like the progeny of Neal Stephenson and Charles Stross, with a touch of Philip K Dick, this is a crazy, chaotic and brilliant, if uneven, read.There was enough here to keep me interested, and I was pleased I read it, even if it is a victim of its own ambition that doesn t quite hold together in the end Reminiscent of Paul Malmont s books, there is enough here to enjoy that makes it overall a great read It most definitely is not for everyone, yet there is enough to show an active mind at work.Surprisingly, yet pleasingly, recommended

  7. Mike Clarke Mike Clarke says:

    I am of a generation that filled pulp magazines with cheap prophecy Now the events in my own lifetime seem evenfantastic Such ponderous blurb should have been a warning, but with happy memories of Jake Arnott s previous bestsellers The Long Firm, He Kills Coppers, Johnny, Remember Me I was heedless, and thus begun a gruelling, rewardless slog through this soupy stuff A few of the usual Arnott ingredients are present period settings lovingly sketched, the dialogue driven narrativ I am of a generation that filled pulp magazines with cheap prophecy Now the events in my own lifetime seem evenfantastic Such ponderous blurb should have been a warning, but with happy memories of Jake Arnott s previous bestsellers The Long Firm, He Kills Coppers, Johnny, Remember Me I was heedless, and thus begun a gruelling, rewardless slog through this soupy stuff A few of the usual Arnott ingredients are present period settings lovingly sketched, the dialogue driven narrative capturing the sounds of an era but somewhere it s gone horribly wrong In attempting I think to write in a film noir pulp fiction crossover, Arnott s sure style has deserted him This is a heavy, remorseless sort of book that weighs the reader down with an uneven pace, far too many subplots and a lack of conclusiveness.I was going to say that there are too many good ideas in here and it really should have been the genesis of several novels not just one, but I m so bored with that I wonder if it s fear that the engulfing crisis in publishing means their future great novels risk not being birthed that makes Zadie, Kate and now Jake try to jam in everything and the kitchen sink Enough I want a book that isn t going to require repeated reprises to stick in my mind when I get about 30 minutes a day for some entertainment as night falls Stop trying to be so epic on my time The good bits are when he writes both economically and freely a neat trick if you can manage it such as the short riff between Hitler and Hess on how the former hated the moon Offbeat and off plot, and it could have been a particularly annoying section really, but compelling in its handling But there s too much languorous, slow moving, unengaging flapdoodle, and one or two frighteningly bad bits, including the silly old satanists pretending they re having sex with Baphomet Add in Roswell, Jim Jones and his people s temple, a self obsessed and unpleasant fantasist and an archetypically airheaded porno actress and you get a mix of dozens of characters and situations it s very hard to invest in or care about.Here s another fine writer trying just a bit to hard and the creaks and the groans are audible Could this be the secret history of the 20th century asks the publisher breathlessly Who will you believe On the basis of this, I m going back to Lady Antonia Fraser and a large creme de menthe

  8. Maya Panika Maya Panika says:

    I loved this book It took me a while to love it, but once the connections start to engage, it snaps into sharp focus and the structure of the whole comes plain It is a complicated novel and very difficult to review.A series of episodes, a set of lives loosely linked are woven together the strange prophetic novel that seems to predict Rudolph Hess s flight to Scotland, a young writer of pulp SF and his relationship to a cult that is connected to Aleister Crowley who is connected to a secret se I loved this book It took me a while to love it, but once the connections start to engage, it snaps into sharp focus and the structure of the whole comes plain It is a complicated novel and very difficult to review.A series of episodes, a set of lives loosely linked are woven together the strange prophetic novel that seems to predict Rudolph Hess s flight to Scotland, a young writer of pulp SF and his relationship to a cult that is connected to Aleister Crowley who is connected to a secret service agent who is connected to Rudolph Hess who is connected to a notorious transvestite who is connected to a confused singer turned actor who is making a film based on an old SF story that brings us back to the pulp writers It all comes around in the end, full circle, connecting not neatly or nicely, but very satisfyingly I don t know enough about the Tarot to know if the episodes follow its story of the Fool s journey or if that s a conceit since Jake Arnott uses the Crowley Tarot rather than the classic deck and since Crowley appears as in the story and the theme of occultism runs through it, I assume it s highly significant and I should probably readabout it Quantum entanglement is another theme, and other theories of quantum physics, and it draws a lot of inspiration from Michael Coleman Talbot and the hologramatic universe theory It took a while to get it who are these people, how can they possibly have anything In common But as you keep reading the thing begins to develop a definite WOW factor The artistry of it is stunning it reminds me of those pictures that were so popular when I was a student, you peer endlessly into what seems to be a bank of impenetrable colour and then, suddenly, you see the image, everything snaps into sharp focus, everything becomes clear It took about 5 days bedtime reading for this book to become something I couldn t wait to pick up again each night Stick with it, it takes time to develop but it s definitely worth it It s not a book for everyone, it s certainly not the page turning thriller the cover blurb suggests, but if enjoy a challenging novel that requires you to think a little, or you have any interest at all in quantum physics, you ll love it

  9. Thom Thom says:

    Jake Arnott is best known for his early novels based in the London ganglands of the 1960s, but since publishing Johnny Come Home in 2006, he has focused onesoteric aspects of twentieth century history, focusing on radical political groups and occultists The House of Rumour brings these strands together, with a plot taking in most of the major conspiracies of past 60 years, from Rudolph Hess through to Aleister Crowley, as well as Jonestown and the Black Panthers Arnott s characters inhab Jake Arnott is best known for his early novels based in the London ganglands of the 1960s, but since publishing Johnny Come Home in 2006, he has focused onesoteric aspects of twentieth century history, focusing on radical political groups and occultists The House of Rumour brings these strands together, with a plot taking in most of the major conspiracies of past 60 years, from Rudolph Hess through to Aleister Crowley, as well as Jonestown and the Black Panthers Arnott s characters inhabit Chapel Perilous, the psychological state described by Robert Anton Wilson in which individuals cannot be certain whether or not their actions are being influenced by supernatural forces, or whether the conspiracies exist in their own heads The best bits of the novel deal with Ian Fleming s role in British Intelligence during World War 2, and there is a very effective passage incorporating Hess s mysterious flight to Scotland and the Apollo 11 mission Elsewhere, the book gets a little bogged down with a multiplicity of voices, but there are plenty of interesting inroads into the shadow history of the century

  10. Richard Richard says:

    This has the potential to be a really great book but just warbles on too much It s a fine idea about how much of 20th Century history was tied in with the occult and how those in power use magic for their own ends Unfortunately it goes off on way too many tangents for me.

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