Gothic Music: The Sounds of the Uncanny PDF/EPUB ê



10 thoughts on “Gothic Music: The Sounds of the Uncanny

  1. Baal Of Baal Of says:

    I have a vivid memory of my first encounter with music that I explicitly understood as Gothic My friend Troy was driving us to the UT campus in his Ford Torino for one of our late night wanderings, and he popped in a mix tape Charles sent me this recently I don t know if you ll like it, but check this out And the sounds of Bela Lugosi s Dead crept from the speakers I was entranced This was exactly the kind of music I had been gravitating towards for the last few years I was already fami I have a vivid memory of my first encounter with music that I explicitly understood as Gothic My friend Troy was driving us to the UT campus in his Ford Torino for one of our late night wanderings, and he popped in a mix tape Charles sent me this recently I don t know if you ll like it, but check this out And the sounds of Bela Lugosi s Dead crept from the speakers I was entranced This was exactly the kind of music I had been gravitating towards for the last few years I was already familiar with The Church, and The Cure, but I can t remember if I already knew about Joy Division the sequences of my music journey are lost to me now, except in the broadest of impressions But at that instant, I knew a whole new world of music had opened up to me, and my already deep interest in the darker side of music had just found a new cavern to explore.As an aside, van Elferen makes a distinction that a Gothic scene or Gothic milieu is aaccurate terminology than Gothic subculture, given the fact that the goth scene is too widely varied and lacks the kind of binding common values to be properly called a subculture Note that this is from my memory and I couldn t find the keywords in the index to find the exact passage, and my 45 minutes of skimming through the book again did not help me uncover it, so take that as paraphrasing I will use the term Goth scene going forward to refer to the social world in which I became immersed.My entry into the Goth scene came a littlethan 10 years after its origin At this time the Goth scene was still mostly considered an object of derision by mainstream society, a butt of jokes, scorn, and accusations that goths cared for littlethan moping in their bedrooms, writing bad poetry in diaries, being obsessed with stupid things, and being conformists In contrast, what I found was a vibrant, wildly varying and creative group of people, with beliefs and values ranging all over the map, tied together by a common love of dark and melancholy aspects of life and culture Far from being conformists, the goths I became friends and acquaintances with brought stunningly different aesthetics and styles together to somehow all end up being loosely Gothic Above all I found the Goth scene to be both intellectual and accepting, and from this I learned to beaccepting as well, for example completely losing the homophobia I had been raised with The unifying feature was darkness whatever that meant, which ties in to van Elferen s core thesis the Gothic is about the uncanny, that is the strangely familiar rather than just the simply mysterious It is fascinating to read such a deeply researched and scholarly examination of just what makes Gothic, and further takes the lines of inquiry into the literary realm Van Elferen draws from sources such as Derrida and Nietzsche placing much of her synthesis outside my areas of knowledge, which means I am probably missing out on a good portion of her depth of meaning Nevertheless I felt edified after reading this book, and I like that she gives a solid intellectual foundation to my love of Gothic music.To clarify the scope of what van Elferen considers Gothic music, she covers 5 areas of popular culture, each given a chapter to allow a deep examination of how music is used to evoke a sense of the uncanny She stars with Gothic literature and the use of descriptions of sounds and silence, and specifically disembodied voices and sounds disconnected from their source, which create the feel of something both familiar and strange From literature she then moves to film music, TV music and computer game music, and finally to Goth music, linking each with the uncanny thread There is no attempt to be a complete overview of the entirety of the vast richness of Goth music, for example Dead Can Dance are not even mentioned, and Sisters Of Mercy are given only one mention, however she picks her examples for dissection with care, and uses each choice effectively to build her case This is a book that I feel I should revisit in a few years Even better, I would like to have a discussion with friends who have also read it.Since this book was written in a university context, there is word usage outside my normal parameters In particular, I was thrilled to learn about diegetic vs non diegetic music, and I now regularly pay attention to that distinction when watching TV or movies Some other words I had to either learn or refine my understanding of were sfumato, hauntology and ontology For the most part, van Elferen writes in a style that is approachable but there were occasional sections such asthe obsessive foregroundedness of Gothic media can produce a momentary position of epistemological uncertainty whose euphoria stems from its bleeding into an ontological uncertainty What is observed here is the effect of hauntography, the ontological destabilisation caused by the disclosure of pervasive spectrality which, to be fair is partially her quoting of Alex Link I still don t understand that sentence, and perhaps I never will.This book is clearly aimed at a very narrow and specific slice of people, but for those that care about this kind of thing, it is deeply gratifying and maybe even a bit revelatory


  2. Kathleen Kathleen says:

    Chris Baldick describes Gothic as a fearful sense of inheritance in time with the claustrophobic sense of enclosure in space, these two dimensions reinforcing one another to produce an impression of sickening descent into disintegration 11.


  3. Ebm Dj Ebm Dj says:

    This turned out to be a great find For anyone into the darker aesthetics of the music industry, it was a worthwhile read


  4. Ebm Dj Ebm Dj says:

    I found this book to be a delightful read For anyone just casually interested in the topic or anyone knee deep into the gothic music scene, it s a great book to pick up.


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Gothic Music: The Sounds of the Uncanny [Download] ➾ Gothic Music: The Sounds of the Uncanny ➹ Isabella van Elferen – Thomashillier.co.uk Gothic Music traces the sound of the Gothic from the eerie echoing footsteps that haunt gothic novels to the dark soundscapes that give contemporary goth nightclubs their dark atmosphere This broad pe Gothic Music traces the sound of the Gothic The Sounds PDF/EPUB » from the eerie echoing footsteps that haunt gothic novels to the dark soundscapes that give contemporary goth nightclubs their dark atmosphere This broad Gothic Music: PDF/EPUB ² perspective enables Isabella van Elferen to widen the scope of gothic music which includes bands such as Christian Death, Bauhaus, The Damned, and The Sisters of Mercy from its roots in the Music: The Sounds PDF Í contemporary goth subculture to manifestations in mainstream literature, film, television, and video games, while also offering a musical and theoretical definition of gothic music that is lacking in current scholarship Bringing together versions of the Gothic in all media, van Elferen connects those to the subculture a historical and theoretical connection that has not been made previously in gothicist or goth scholarship Whether giving voice to the spectral beings of early cinema, announcing virtual terrors in video games, or intensifying goth s nocturnal rituals, gothic music truly represents the sounds of the uncanny.