The Gypsies eBook ↠ Paperback


    The Gypsies eBook ↠ Paperback story of The Gypsies fascinating customs and their neverending struggle to survive as free nomads in a hostile world."/>
  • Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • The Gypsies
  • Jan Yoors
  • English
  • 22 December 2017
  • 0881333050

10 thoughts on “The Gypsies

  1. Adam Adam says:

    ROAMING WITH THE ROMAI first learned of the existence of this extraordinarily fascinating book by Jan Yoors when I was reading Fonseca s book about gypsies Roma , Bury me Standing Published in 1967, this book is available from on line second hand stores.Sometime in between the 2 world wars, Jan Yoor, a young Belgian teenager, did something very unusual He ran away with the gypsies He joined a group kumpania of Roma camping near to his home, and was eventually adopted by them His under ROAMING WITH THE ROMAI first learned of the existence of this extraordinarily fascinating book by Jan Yoors when I was reading Fonseca s book about gypsies Roma , Bury me Standing Published in 1967, this book is available from on line second hand stores.Sometime in between the 2 world wars, Jan Yoor, a young Belgian teenager, did something very unusual He ran away with the gypsies He joined a group kumpania of Roma camping near to his home, and was eventually adopted by them His understanding parents did not seem to mind him being away from home and school for long periods whilst he wandered around Europe with his new companions.Yoor s first hand experiences of living the life of a young gypsy were not wasted Years later, he described them in his book The Gypsies His account of living with the Roma is detailed and seems accurate Yet, it is not a dispassionate anthropological study As I read his book, I felt that I was almost experiencing the trials and tribulations of life on the road with the gypsies Yoors shows a deep understanding of the subtleties of the Roma mentality, and describes their beliefs, traditions, and daily life, exquisitely At times, his writing has a poetic quality, yet it never becomes trite or flowery The Roma could not have wished for asympathetic yet objective description of their lives than that written by Yoors.Read this gracious book, and you will see the Roma in an entirely new light


  2. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    If you are trying to understand how gypsies think, reason and behave this is one book I can recommend, but I learned that there are gypsies and then there are gypsies There are those that are scarcely nomadic anythe Gitanos of Spain and France,the Sinti of Germany and the Rudari of Romania The Rom that are dispersed around the world may be split up into four main tribes the Lowara, the Tshurara, the Kalderasha and the Matchyaya They differ in appearance, temperament, occupations, lan If you are trying to understand how gypsies think, reason and behave this is one book I can recommend, but I learned that there are gypsies and then there are gypsies There are those that are scarcely nomadic anythe Gitanos of Spain and France,the Sinti of Germany and the Rudari of Romania The Rom that are dispersed around the world may be split up into four main tribes the Lowara, the Tshurara, the Kalderasha and the Matchyaya They differ in appearance, temperament, occupations, language and mode of living Their customs and traditions differ The Lowara and the Tshurara are predominantly horse dealers, while the Kalderasha, which are the most numerous, are coppersmiths and live in tents The author, who was born in Antwerp, Belgium, left home at the age of twelve to live with Lowara Rom It is the customs, traditions, beliefs and behavior of this group that one learns most about in this book The author spent ten years living with the Lowara, during the 1930s The dates are very unclear There are few people who straddle both the Rom and the Gaje communities, as non gypsies are called by the Rom The book concludes with the treatment of the Rom during WW2 The book covers the food, festivals, manner of comportment, clothing, marriage, birth of children and death among these people The author was accepted as one of them, although he periodically left them and returned to his birth family It is very strange to observe how his Belgian family reacted He stayed predominantly with one large family , living with them in a horse drawn wagon, several wagons making up the kumpania A little time is spent with both Tshurara and Kalderasha Rom, allowing readers to learn about the tribal differences My reaction to this was that there was little tolerance between the different groups Intermarriage is rare Although I learned a lot from this book, I do not necessarily trust the validity of all the statements The author is speaking as a Lowara speaks He was not impartial I questioned his credibility, particularly his judgments of gypsies from other tribes He was very supportive of the Lowara beliefs and extremely critical of the Tshurara Rom Here I am, trying desperately to see as the Rom do, to understand how they think, and I find they are so mistrustful and hateful towards each other and of course the Gaje too Trickery is central to their lifestyle No denial of this is made in the book I use the word trickery because I cannot drop my moral code and see their actions as they see them They feel for example it is OK to steal chickens, because they need them for food, we are told they only take a little and only what is absolutely necessary Do I believe that How do you define what is necessary I still cannot excuse or accept this behavior They feel they may cheat non gypsies because they are mistreated After reading this book I cannot forgive or even really understand their life choices They are intolerant of non gypsies and of each other Although I have learned a lot, this book has not made meforgiving ortolerant of their misdemeanors I have learned so many things about them that I do not like I cannot think as they do I thought this book would bring me closer rather than pushing me away from the Rom


  3. Kathy Kathy says:

    A LIFE CHANGING BOOK FOR ME I THINK I RECOGNIZED MY NAN MADE ME WANT TO LEARN MORE AND MORE.


  4. Andre Andre says:

    If the author wanted to dispel gypsy stereotypes, he sure as hell did not do a good job If you take gypsy stereotypes and take out theextreme once like actual witchcraft and sexual promiscuity, you are pretty much left with the image the author presents of these Lovarra.And even though the book is called The gypsies the author makes it pretty clear early on that he is not interested in any gypsies that live sedentary of seminomadic like gitanoes, gypsies of England, Sinti and Rudari If the author wanted to dispel gypsy stereotypes, he sure as hell did not do a good job If you take gypsy stereotypes and take out theextreme once like actual witchcraft and sexual promiscuity, you are pretty much left with the image the author presents of these Lovarra.And even though the book is called The gypsies the author makes it pretty clear early on that he is not interested in any gypsies that live sedentary of seminomadic like gitanoes, gypsies of England, Sinti and Rudari He outright says he is only writing about nomadic gypsies he seems to look down e.g on the urban Kalderasha girls , he says their disheveled appearance is some defense mechanism and considered totally normal and says they are not really Christian or Muslim, it is only a thin veneer to hide their true religion which are exactly some of the stereotypes known.And he is not even consistent You see while some statements support the unkemptness of gypsies the author stated at the start, others don t fit that at all and he almost seems to hesitate calling them strict in their rules He didn t want to call them Victorian but based on what he says their rules are just as strict.If what the author wrote here is true than these people are gypsies in every way There is no regular way of acquisition mentioned except theft for a long time, no income except begging, magic and fortune telling until late in the book when horse trading is mentioned They are xenophobic Constantly lie and blame the gaje for it and according to him they may not even be poor When the author wrote that Kore and another boy went to a nearby hamlet to offer to whet knives and sharpen and adjust scissors, I hoped that finally there is some other income except begging, magic and theft, but nope They charmed the daughter into one scissor which they only gave back because Jan prodded Kore to, who saw nothing bad in the theft and Jan excuses it with indifference to material possession In fact he tends to state gaje as evil quite quickly while excusing every Roma behavior The moment these Rom have an honest trade horses we get this story of how Jan and Nanosh rip off some Jewish tailor because they reason that their dresses are so extravagant, that he can give it to no one else, even if they cannot pay in full That is the reasoning of a swindler.I know the author tries to portray the Gaje as unjustifiably mistrustful and somehow the gypsies as justified, at least he doesn t condemn it, if all of them in the group act like Pulika and Kore, I see no reason to trust them They are liars, thieves, xenophobic, chauvinist and quite frankly when you are not one of them you cannot trust them at all At least based on what the author is writing The people he presents are insanely superstitious, xenophobic and anti women Of course the author tries to excuse it or spin the latter as somehow something positive for women that half their body is considered impure.Is it even verified that what he wrote happened You see theI read of this book theI suspected that the author misinterpreted things or made them up He claimed that gypsies have no Christianity but ancestor worship but so far except for that spell there was no ancestor worship, he says they do not bond or want to associate with gaje, but then they do it whenever there is opportunity to do it, they have friendship and many even own land apparently The only thing consistent is that he excuses their criminal behavior.And he not only is hypocritical when it comes to Rom and Gaje but also between the different tribes or maybe even groups You see Pulika also claimed to have been King of the Gypsies once, that was ok for the author, but these other kings apparently only call themselves so out of vanity In fact the author seems to have a distain for them because they like to dress stylishly and being well groomed The other gypsies he claims to dress disheveled the kids even wipe their hands on their hair to give it a sheen and being thieves and liars but these kings are the vain ones He described the Tshurara women in exactly the way many would have described his gypsies, wild, unkempt, dirty, the girls with awkward attractiveness And his Kore friend is totally judgmental about them Also I do wonder whether the author did not mix stereotypes with fact as we even had the they are actually rich clich and only when they almost terrorize the country side is he not ok with it He almost rants about the Tshurara, contrasting them to the suddenly oh so disciplined Lovarra, calling them completely undisciplined, dirty and being the reason for the gaje hostility As if he is projecting Maybe the current hostility is due to the Tshurara, wherever the book was currently, but who knows He doesn t know, and he claims the Tshurara only steal, but how would he know When Tshurara girls basically invade a shop and trick the owner, respectively steal from him, the author comments this with that no gypsy would ever be welcome again in that place but when the Lovarra of his group do the same or something similar the consequences are apparently not worth mentioning This double standard made me seriously considering stopping reading this Fonso whipped his sister on the face and hands because when Tsinoro s son had half heartedly pretended to abduct the bride her sigh was to Fonsoa sigh of pleasure and that was too dishonorable for him And of course the author has no comment for that When Gaje and Tshurara do this or gorge themselves wildly he scolds them but his precious Lovarra get scolded barely What a hypocrite.And some things really can only be excused by citing cultural differences because no other would work The author mentions a case where the mother of a baby was 12 or 13 years old, which could mean childbirth is dangerous And yes she is married to a much older man and so the gypsy group here lies and if they want to lie to cover it up, why on earth do they claim this obviously elderly woman is the mother Come to think about it, apart from some exceptions, the only women mentioned are elderly or girls combine that with everything prior and the statements of how often they falsify papers and citizenships this book is a tirade of gypsy stereotypes.Whenever the author talks about what is gypsy, like that true gypsy style is to have no change of clothes, I cannot help but suspect that he is exaggerating or plain lying That someone has no other clothes is hard enough to belief but what about the gypsies who are not nomadic I guess they aren t true gypsies for him aka the guy is judgmental not because of any harm done but because it does not fit his views.Not only does it appear as if the people he is living with don t really tell him anything as he learns apparently important stuff over and over anew, but he comes along as an arrogant prick He referred to the language of the Cale or Gitanos of Spain as a language all their own, much influenced by corrupt Spanish And unless corrupt has some meaning I am not aware of, that is a derogatory statement.And he even complains that the term gypsy is often and inaccurately used to connote romantic dreams of unfettered, unrealizable freedom, adolescent yearnings for a passionate way of life, contempt for the menial, or to specify any good for nothing vagrant of questionable honesty, which is ironic, considering how much this describes the people he presented The most striking difference between what he claims and what I know was when he shortly mentioned Sinti Sinti themselves as far as I know do not say that the word means person or human being And I would not count on most being musicians and makers of stringent instruments even back then Right away I can only remember a few from the time of this book who did that Also they are smaller than the Roma and easily angered The women always clad in black I have seen lots of pictures from Sinti of the time and the women rather tended to dress like this So what is his statement based on And their tribal organization is matriarchal and marriage only by elopement And if their dialect is practically unintelligible to other gypsies, can it really still be called a dialect Also he says it preserved the purest and most ancient forms of words and pronunciations who have lost most of the original inflections and have to a large extent substituted faulty German grammatical structure for their own Wow this guy is condescending And how does he even know that Not to mention that a Lovarra here apologizes to his ancestors, the mule, for relying on the Blessed Virgin of the Gaje Based on everything I ever read and heard about Sinti, they are usually the direct opposite of these Lowara in this regard.Not to mention, considered that then author stated that the Rom follow no form or ritual, they sure as hell seem to be overburdened with ritual, customs, laws and the like.So yeah, the book seems quite contradictory and the title is misleading At best it should have been called The Lovarra PS Only towards the end do we ever get told where the group actually is that time in Paris , prior it was always so vague that it could be anywhere, thereby invoking another gypsy stereotype Just like the claims that these gypsies chose their life and that they want to wander all the time


  5. Calzean Calzean says:

    I have read one other book on the Gypsies Australian Gypsies Their Secret History which is written in recent times through various interviews The stereotype Gypsy is dispelled in both books but this one is farpersonnel and embracing.Yoors leaves home, with his parents permission, and joins a family of Gypsies with this book taking him through his teens and up to WWII He explains there are various types of Gypsies, their customs, lifestyle and relationship with non Gypsies As margin I have read one other book on the Gypsies Australian Gypsies Their Secret History which is written in recent times through various interviews The stereotype Gypsy is dispelled in both books but this one is farpersonnel and embracing.Yoors leaves home, with his parents permission, and joins a family of Gypsies with this book taking him through his teens and up to WWII He explains there are various types of Gypsies, their customs, lifestyle and relationship with non Gypsies As marginalised outsiders, which is what they want, Gypsies also were subjected to persecution, racism and violence Yoors early life was certainly different as he embraced a world unencumbered with the need for chattels


  6. Jason Jason says:

    This book is written as a protest against oblivion, as a cry of love for this race of strangers who have lived among us for centuries and remained apart With this poetic beginning, Jan Yoors tells us the story of his life as he left his family to join a new family among the Rom,commonly called Gypsies For the most part, we gaje non Gypsies in their language only know the most minimal stereotypes about this culture fortunetelling women, swarthy bandana wearing people in covered w This book is written as a protest against oblivion, as a cry of love for this race of strangers who have lived among us for centuries and remained apart With this poetic beginning, Jan Yoors tells us the story of his life as he left his family to join a new family among the Rom,commonly called Gypsies For the most part, we gaje non Gypsies in their language only know the most minimal stereotypes about this culture fortunetelling women, swarthy bandana wearing people in covered wagons who play pranks, the fiddle, and according to many myths, kidnap non Gypsy children Even in the Renaissance fair circuit in the USA, those who dress as gypsies know very little about the real Gypsy culture What Jan Yoors does in his book is pull away the curtain and show us the life of a Rom family on the road, joining at the age of 12, and traveling with them through World War II And he does it as one of their people, not some potentially dry anthropologist or even someone who creates a romanticized cookie cutter vision To Yoors, his family, led by the elder Pulika, are individuals who live their lives like any of us would, just in a very different fashion We learn about how the process of arranged marriages and the negotiations involved, about fortunetelling being the province of Rom women, and how Pulika s group, or kumpania, connect with the non Gypsies for business and pleasure No doubt there are aspects of Gypsy culture that many of us would find negative The concept of purity being one of them, especially with regards to women Long story short, women are considered impure from the waist down, so say their skirts touch the chain of a wagon, it would need to be replaced Don t worry ladies, using the bathroom is also considered impure to the point Gypsy guys have to go check on the horses in a group, because people who go out alone are assumed to be using the bathroom and it s wrong for a person to have other people think that s what they re doing, because it s dirty as an American guy, Hey, I need to hit the restroom, come with me is weird Yoors presents these aspects of Gypsy life fully realizing that his audience may be outraged or weirded out by these, but rather than just have a knee jerk reaction, like they must be total chauvinists , Yoors takes a thoughtful and realistic approach to this, trying to understand how these cultural aspects developed in the case of women and the purity issue, he brings up the point of menstruation and living in very close conditions with very little privacy, and points out how Rom women use this to their benefit, such as getting some privacy and in one case using it to drive other Gypsies away And he does it from a loving perspective there s no doubt his love for the Rom is deep and sincere, but he also does not put them on a pedestal Because of this, The Gypsies becomes a story about individual lives lived in the backdrop of a culture and an overall enriching tale I mark this book under my history shelf because not only does the book focus on the Gypsies, but their interactions with mainstream European culture gives a rare presentation on Europe as the Nazis rise to power and Europe begins to slide into war He discusses how the Gypsies were brutally victimized during the war, with over half a million of their people slaughtered and how the Rom tried to adapt to the situations All in all, this book is a loving, well written story I don t know if Jan Yoors is still alive, but if he isn t I hope there were Rom at his funeral weeping and tearing at themselves the way they do when others of their family pass away


  7. Shelly Cross Shelly Cross says:

    Honestly, I enjoyed this book and learned a little about Romani customs, but a lot of the book seems completely unlikelyit is suppose to be the factual account of a boy who was taken in by a traveling group of Romani when he was 12 years old You find out later that he had perfectly respectable, even well off, parents, but they didn t really look for him or even make a fuss when he got back all those months later then, were happy to let him go back whenever he wanted In addition to that Honestly, I enjoyed this book and learned a little about Romani customs, but a lot of the book seems completely unlikelyit is suppose to be the factual account of a boy who was taken in by a traveling group of Romani when he was 12 years old You find out later that he had perfectly respectable, even well off, parents, but they didn t really look for him or even make a fuss when he got back all those months later then, were happy to let him go back whenever he wanted In addition to that, Romani are known for using implausible stories to throw outsiders off their track so I really don t know how much of this is the truth and how much is just a bunch of bologna I would really like to read a book, written by a Romani, giving a truthful account of their culture Is that too much to ask


  8. Anastasia Riebs Anastasia Riebs says:

    As a person of Romany decent who has been trained in the traditions of my people, I can say with confidence that MUCH of the information in Jan Yoors authoritive text is inaccurate After being given a copy of The Gypsies, I was very angry at how my culture and people were represented Some of the misinformation was laughable, like that of The Gypsy King, which seemed to take on a lot of importance in this book in reality, we are largely matriarchal in our power structure, so idea of our As a person of Romany decent who has been trained in the traditions of my people, I can say with confidence that MUCH of the information in Jan Yoors authoritive text is inaccurate After being given a copy of The Gypsies, I was very angry at how my culture and people were represented Some of the misinformation was laughable, like that of The Gypsy King, which seemed to take on a lot of importance in this book in reality, we are largely matriarchal in our power structure, so idea of our having a king was impossible In truth, the Gypsy King was chosen during Summer Solstice celebrations and wasof a fool it was a position that held no power or authority, and nor does it to this day.Likely the individual who presented himself to Gorgers as the King was playing a trick of some sort for financial gain.Jan Yoors also told stories of Romany people buying simple medicines from drug stores and rebottling them to sell at an inflated price as magic, curative potions I suppose some unscrupulous individuals or Tribes might have done such a thing, but that would NEVER have been an accepted practice within the larger, nomadic Tribal group All smaller Romany Tribal groups have legitimate healers with skills that have been passed down thru the generations for hundreds of years Beyond that, there are entire Tribes who s focus is on traditional healing and the spirit world, where daughters would go for training or to enter into an apprenticeship with aexperienced practitioner The very idea that the Rom would bother to sell cough medicine as a Gypsy cure is ludicrous As a people, the Romany are extremely private, and would NEVER voluntarily share any significant details of Tribal life with an outsider, never Romany are extremely black and white in their moral code, and after reading Jan Yoors collection of stories, I can only assume the Tribe he lived with was a smaller one, living on the fringes of accepted behavior I did share an excerpt or two with my husband, who is also Romany, and he suggested that the things described could only take place in a small band who had formed of individuals who had been shamed in some way for their own conduct and forced to leave their own Tribes and were unable to find a respectable Tribe who would be willing to accept them.This does seem a reasonable possibility, especially if they were having a difficult time providing for themselves and thought having a Gorger travel with them might increase revenue The idea that the author was accepted in is dubious, though, as traditionally, all members of the Tribe s council, in addition to any concerned Tribal members, would need to come to a consensus regarding allowing anyone from outside the Tribe to join them That individual would be required to have skills that would bring enough wealth to contribute to the entire Tribe, in addition to providing enough for his own needs.It would also necessitate that person s own Tribe entering into negotiations to account for the loss of a valuable member of their group and potentiality gifts to the new Tribe to make up for any lack in value carried by the prospective member.Ultimately, my husband and I ripped the book up and threw it out


  9. Lasher Lane Lasher Lane says:

    I first found this book in the Seventies, on the bookshelves of Weiser s in NYC I lent the paperback to a friend who never returned it because he fell in love with it, too It is still my favorite and the most beautifully written book I ve ever read After reading it, I felt so sympathetic to their people culture that I joined The Gypsy Lore Society, of which I am still a member I m glad the book is available in print again.


  10. Jane Jane says:

    I read this probably 30 years ago and was entranced by this unusual tale One has to wonder what sort of parents would allow their son to run away with the Gypsies quite regularly, but when you read the book, you are glad that they did so I cannot compare it to any other book I have ever read This is an inside, fond but honest look at gypsy life as it existed then Many years later, the author tried to find the gypsies he remembered, and that book was a much sadder portrayal, but also worth re I read this probably 30 years ago and was entranced by this unusual tale One has to wonder what sort of parents would allow their son to run away with the Gypsies quite regularly, but when you read the book, you are glad that they did so I cannot compare it to any other book I have ever read This is an inside, fond but honest look at gypsy life as it existed then Many years later, the author tried to find the gypsies he remembered, and that book was a much sadder portrayal, but also worth reading


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The Gypsies❮Download❯ ➵ The Gypsies Author Jan Yoors – Thomashillier.co.uk At the age of twelve, Jan Yoors ran away from his privileged, cultured Belgian family and home to join a wandering band, a kumpania, of Gypsies For ten years, he lived as one of them, traveled with th At the age of twelve, Jan Yoors ran away from his privileged, cultured Belgian family and home to join a wandering band, a kumpania, of Gypsies For ten years, he lived as one of them, traveled with them from country to country, shared both their pleasures and their hardships and came to know them as no one, no outsider, ever has Here, in this firsthand and highly personal account of an extraordinary people, Yoors tells the real story of The Gypsies fascinating customs and their neverending struggle to survive as free nomads in a hostile world.


About the Author: Jan Yoors

Jan Yoors was born to a cultured, liberal family of artists, but at the age of twelve he ran off with a Gypsy tribe and lived with the kumpania on and off for the next ten years During World War II, Yoors worked with the Allies to help the Gypsies who were being systematically exterminated He was captured twice and imprisoned until the end of the warIn Yoors settled in New York City, where he set up a studio and constructed a foot vertical loom His wife Marianne and her sister Annebert joined him in they were to collaborate with Yoors in the weaving of all his work His work brought him international acclaim In the s Yoors deepened his interest in photography He returned to Europe to reestablish contact with those Gypsies who had survived the Holocaust The pictures he took on this journey became an exhibition at the National Museum of Science in New York City and now illustrate the paperback edition of The Gypsies.