The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure

The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure ✅ [PDF / Epub] ☉ The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure By Tristan Taormino ⚣ – Thomashillier.co.uk The Feminist Porn Book brings together for the first time writings by feminists in the adult industry and research by feminist porn scholars This book investigates not only how feminists understand po The Feminist Porn Book brings together for the Porn Book: eBook ☆ first time writings by feminists in the adult industry and research by feminist porn scholars This book investigates not only how feminists understand pornography, but also how feminists do porn that is, direct, act in, produce, and consume one of the world s most lucrative and growing industries With original contributions by Susie Bright, Candida Royalle, Betty Dodson, Nina Hartley, Buck Angel, and , The Feminist Porn Book updates the debates of the porn wars of the s, which sharply divided the The Feminist PDF \ women s movement, and identifies pornography as a form of expression and labor in which women and other minorities produce power and pleasureTristan Taormino is an award winning author, columnist, editor, sex educator, and feminist pornographer She is the author of seven books including The Ultimate Guide to Anal Sex for Women and Opening Up She runs the adult film production company Smart Ass Productions and is an exclusive director for Vivid EntertainmentCeline Parre as Shimizu is an associate professor of film and performance studies at the University of California, Santa Feminist Porn Book: Epub µ Barbara, and founding editor of Camera Obscura She is the author of Straitjacket Sexualities and theCultural Studies Book Award winning, The Hypersexuality of RaceMireille Miller Young is assistant professor of feminist studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara Her forthcoming book, A Taste for Brown Sugar Black Women, Sex Work, and Pornography Duke University Press examines African American women s sex work in the porn industry.


10 thoughts on “The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure

  1. Thomas Thomas says:

    No doubt that porn shapes our culture and that our culture shapes porn, so I appreciate The Feminist Porn Book for addressing pornography in deep, meaningful ways The editors include a multitude of voices, including sex workers who have starred in porn, porn producers, porn academics, as well as people from different racial ethnic groups, cis and trans voices, able and disabled individuals, queer perspectives, etc I most enjoyed reading the essays in which those within the industry critiqued t No doubt that porn shapes our culture and that our culture shapes porn, so I appreciate The Feminist Porn Book for addressing pornography in deep, meaningful ways The editors include a multitude of voices, including sex workers who have starred in porn, porn producers, porn academics, as well as people from different racial ethnic groups, cis and trans voices, able and disabled individuals, queer perspectives, etc I most enjoyed reading the essays in which those within the industry critiqued the problematic parts of it, such as women who called out the facial money shot for its objectification, women of color who named their exotification and fetishization within the industry, and trans and disabled writers who reclaimed their own attractiveness through their sex work While porn is often rightfully associated with misogyny and sexism, this collection highlights those working within the industry trying to improve it That said, as fellow Goodreads reviewer Melissa writes in her review, I found the lack of critique of capitalism and labor exploitation a bit unsettling I m not critiquing the sex workers for their choices, I just wish the editors had included some writing about how to better support sex workers in the industry from an economic justice perspective, especially those who come from marginalized backgrounds A few essays touch on this point, about porn being driven by consumers and how no matter what at the end of the day a product is being sold, yet I felt underwhelmed by the depth of the economic analysis Perhaps I feel this way about this book because I recently read the amazing Revolting Prostitutes , which included a thorough naming and deconstruction of capitalism Overall, a good book that I would recommend to those interested in sexuality, sexual expression, media studies, feminism, or just like, porn My favorite essay Keiko Lane s Imag in ing Possibilities The Psychotherapeutic Potential of Queer Pornography, a powerful work about a therapist recognizing her own complicity in pathologizing queer desire and how she has striven to do better While some of the essays have a bit too much jargon, the overall intent of the collection to create a compilation of feminist essays on pornography to work toward dismantling the complete fixation on white, heterosexual men s pleasure rings clear


  2. Melissa Melissa says:

    This book had some great essays about how to make feminist porn although if visual representations of sex are feminist, I much rather call it erotica than porn , but a majority of the essays put a bad taste in my mouth primarily because they never once questioned capitalism, exploitative labor, and the connections of the control of women s bodies to capitalism and instead very explicitly celebrated it You re not making good feminist porn if your tantamount goal is capital and not the explosi This book had some great essays about how to make feminist porn although if visual representations of sex are feminist, I much rather call it erotica than porn , but a majority of the essays put a bad taste in my mouth primarily because they never once questioned capitalism, exploitative labor, and the connections of the control of women s bodies to capitalism and instead very explicitly celebrated it You re not making good feminist porn if your tantamount goal is capital and not the explosion of patriarchal, heterosexist, cissexist, ableist, sizest, and white supremacist control of the gaze No way, no how the revolution will be not be funded, thank you very much There was rarely an acknowledgement that feminists can watch and engage with porn and support sex workers their autonomy, their sexualities, their health, their skilled labor while still hating what capitalism does to exploit people s labor There definitely needed to be a book which explored feminist porn, but there was this underlying attitude in many of the essays that shamed you for being a feminist who aims for the destruction of capitalism


  3. Kara Babcock Kara Babcock says:

    My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit This powerful statement, first deployed and used in this essay by Flavia Dzodan, is often on my mind And I choose to open my review of The Feminist Porn Book with it, because that is how I want to position myself As a white person, I recognize I have a hell of a lot of privilege in our society So it is imperative that I remember the importance of intersectionality, and that I work hard not to let my feminist thoughts and statements i My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit This powerful statement, first deployed and used in this essay by Flavia Dzodan, is often on my mind And I choose to open my review of The Feminist Porn Book with it, because that is how I want to position myself As a white person, I recognize I have a hell of a lot of privilege in our society So it is imperative that I remember the importance of intersectionality, and that I work hard not to let my feminist thoughts and statements inadvertently support other systems of oppression.I choose to open my review of The Feminist Porn Book with this statement, because sex work is a nexus of intersectionality Sex work requires us to interact with sexism and misogyny, with transphobia and homopobia, with racism and abelism, and with capitalist exploitation We must engage with all of these issues we must be intersectional when discussing sex work So it can t even be as simple as being pro sex work or anti sex work or pornography The issue is farnuanced than that, and that s why I picked up this book.If you want a one sentence summary The Feminist Porn Book is a collection of scholarly and personal essays about feminism and porn from people who study, produce, direct, or perform in pornography Many of the essays are highly academic, both in tone and language and in the sense that they are rigorously cited with endnotes Many of the essays come from people who have spent most of their adult lives behind of or in front of the camera, directly engaging with pornography and with their own complex feelings about the medium and how it relates with feminist movements Although certain common themes run throughout some of the essays, and the editors have grouped them largely into four broad topics, each essay is its own revelation given the author s unique experiences, perspective, and opinions.This is a diverse book, for the most part There are cis and trans voices, abled and disabled voices, Black and brown and white voices, straight and queer voices, etc There are certainly some voices missing from the conversation in their introduction, the authors admit that this volume focuses on the porn industry of the West for feminist porn to be a global project,work would need to be done to include non Western scholars and pornographers in the conversation Yet I think it is a good sign of the diversity of this collection that not all of the essays line up behind a single ideology of feminist porn Or, as the introduction states Throughout the book, we explore the multiple definitions of feminist porn, but we refuse to fix its boundaries Certainly there are aspects of some essays I didn t agree with or would critique, others that are oppositional to each other but that I don t yet have an opinion on, one way or the other That s awesome This is a book that makes you think and question.The first part of the book provides a bit of history into the emergence of feminist porn The first essay is an excerpt from Betty Dodson s memoir This is one piece that I found both fascinating and occasionally frustrating, for Dodson throws off little nuggets like, Most men are hardwired to have multiple sex partners that set my skeptical of evolutionary psychology and gender essentialism alarm bells ringing By and large, however, this part of the book is very eye opening for a younger reader like myself As someone who came of age online, it s hard to understand what it would have been like to live in a world that did not have constant, immediate access to porn I mean, these days it is hard to avoid even with your safe search filter on I know, in theory, that there existed a time of the porno videotape and the hard copy porno mag, etc but I don t know what that world is like, or what it was like for those people producing porn and trying to make it feminist.The second part of the book concerns the feedback cycle between watching porn and producing feminist porn This section truly embraces intersectionality They approach the question of feminist porn from the perspectives of race, queer identity, therapy, andThe essays herein really challenge the reader to consider porn beyond the thin veneer of primarily heterosexual, heavily racist, commodified pornography that we often find at the surface of the industry.One of my main takeaways of this book is that I really still have so muchto learn about this subject I feel like I might have felt back when I first started learning about sexism, misogyny, patriarchy, etc I m still learning the vocabulary and trying to listen to all the various voices of those directly involved and marginalized by these issues Most crucially, I m aware that I need to be careful of generalizing about porn For example, just before I started reading this book, I was having a conversation with a friend about porn because, yeah, I have awesome friends who will talk to me about porn I said, among other things, that it s unfortunate people often get their sex education from porn these days In some sense, I still agree with that sentiment the extremely problematic porn I mentioned above, which is so easily available and prevalent, creates so many problems if internalized as a representation of what sex really is Yet in making that statement, I simultaneously erased the whole part of the industry devoted to creating actual educational porn.That s why the third part of the book is probably my favourite This section examines the intersections of feminist porn and scholarship Some of the essays are by academics who write and teach about porn, whether it s in a women s studies or gender studies or film studies course It s really cool to hear about their experiences creating their syllabi, how they teach, the resistance or buy in they ve encountered from students or faculty or the public As an educator, this all fascinates me Similarly, as an educator and just someone who believes in good sex ed in general, I loved reading the essays from Nina Hartley and Tristan Taormino, who explain both their rationales and their methodologies behind creating educational porn This section also includes a standout essay by Ariane Cruz, who examines her complicated and conflicting feelings as a Black woman studying how porn represents Black women as part of her PhD She explains the way that this has affected her life, her organization of her personal space at home, and how she relates to herself, to others, to her partner, to pornography.The final section of this book showcases several feminist porn producers and performers, giving them a platform to explain their personal visions of what feminist porn should comprise These essays are all fascinating in their own right I have to admit that by the time I reached them, even though I was already reading this book one essay at a time alongside other books, I was feeling a little psychically fatigued, and I probably didn t give these as much consideration as they are due.The United States just passed a law FOSTA SESTA heavily constraining the ways in which sex workers can communicate online It s ostensibly to help stop sex trafficking Being both Canadian and just very busy and unable to keep on top of every American political crisis, I honestly have not paid much attention to this one but the sex workers I ve seen speak about it are not happy, charging the proponents of this law with using it to restrict sex work, to legislate morality and those are the voices I would listen to While Canada might not have exactly the same issues, we aren t necessarily better Here in Ontario we are about to head into a provincial election, and the Conservative party is chomping at the bit to roll back relatively new curriculum with very progressive and healthy guidelines for teaching sex, sexuality, and gender In some ways we live in a quite progressive era, yet in others we remain incredibly conservative and judgemental.Whatever your personal stance on porn and sex work, the fact remains it s a part of our society There are people who do it People who are exploited by it, people who exploit it, people who seek to dismantle and turn it inside out and make it feminist It is, like any other industry or artistic endeavour or social moment, a complicated and diverse and non monolithic phenomenon that deserves scrutiny, critique, and careful thought What kind of society do I want A feminist one A sex positive one A safe one And that means engaging with sex work and pornography, discussing it, listening to those involved and trying to steer policy in a way that protects vulnerable people without throwing hard working people under the bus.So it kind of seems like The Feminist Porn Book isnecessary today than ever We need to talkabout sex We need to stop twisting ourselves into contortions to try to sound both pro porn or anti porn depending on who s listening That isn t the point The point is that we should respect the autonomy and agency of sex workers and take our cues from them when it comes to dismantling and changing the problematic parts of their industry If I want to talk reform of peer review, I m going to listen to scientists As a teacher, I hope my words carry weight when we talk about changing education So if you are interested in learningabout porn and its intersections with feminism, racism, etc., then this is a great place to start.But it s only a start


  4. Maya Maya says:

    The fact that people apologizing and working for the filmed rape industry can call themselves feminists just goes to show how meaningless that word has become.


  5. Jack Hart Jack Hart says:

    If this book were a machine it would be one that did a lot of different jobs and had a lot of moving parts Moreover, it would come as a kit which one would have to put together for oneself in accordance with the particular uses that came to mind The fact that it s for an as yet largely uncreated audience makes it interesting, intriguing, and maybe important Several Good Reads reviews reckon with the fact that the book is not on the whole for them by suggesting that the reader skip over the es If this book were a machine it would be one that did a lot of different jobs and had a lot of moving parts Moreover, it would come as a kit which one would have to put together for oneself in accordance with the particular uses that came to mind The fact that it s for an as yet largely uncreated audience makes it interesting, intriguing, and maybe important Several Good Reads reviews reckon with the fact that the book is not on the whole for them by suggesting that the reader skip over the essays whose language or point of view is unappealing That s probably good advice for any work composed of a large number of various voices It s also, though, worth noting that someone else is savoring and dwelling upon the very essays one samples and skips There are two stances one can take toward this reading fact The first is traditional different strokes for different folks tolerance You read yours, and I ll read mine But, the volume can be said to represent an opportunity for readerly edge play The point, of course, is not to convert a squik out to a turn on, but to come to a comfortable familiarity with a range of embodied experience different than one s own Because without some sense of an active inquiry into intimate experience as it exists outside the range of one s bodily memories, tolerance tends toward indifference, and s all too easily pass themselves off as morality.So The Feminist Porn Book offers, at a high level of abstraction, a safe place for a non personal exploration of the philosophical form of the question What is hot By opening that seemingly conventional question up to also ask For whom When and where and how and why And what innovations in hotness might be possible Andspecifically, what is hot when pornography prioritizes and celebrates female desire, pleasure, and orgasm Many of the pornographers writing here are quite forthcoming about making the kind of porn they wanted to see, but could not find on the market Many of the professorial students of porn are as candid as they can manage to be about the mysteries of their own vexed taste for porn It all makes for an unprecedented exploration of the category of the hot If you re like me you ve heard the term sex positive often enough to realize it was deployed by some self conscious group that aspired to be a movement, but you had no information concerning the activists, performers, writers, scholars, and entrepreneurs who made the movement go The Feminist Porn Book serves as a kind of informal genealogical survey of some of that movement s central voices.One of thereviewers complained that the same ten names are referenced over and over, and while that s true, to complain about it strikes me as ungenerous That s because these names often come up in the course of first person essays in which someone is celebrating or wrestling with their involvement with porn As they explain their journey they cite the names of those they ve met, argued with, and been influenced by Assembling these same ten names, then, I would see as part of the book s achievement In a few short decades the direct influence of the vital lives of Betty Dodson, Nina Hartley, and Susie Bright will be lost to living memory The Feminist Porn Book includes memoir essays by these founding figures, as well as well as a lot of grateful citation by women whose lives, thought, expression, and inner composure achieved through sexual and intellectual exploration they ve made possible I guess if you read a bunch of thank you notes as thank you notes they d be pretty boring unless they were written to you But lines of gratitude are a way to enter the deeper mysteries of transmission, and are a crucial function of any writing whose aim is high influence One of the things I admire about The Feminist Porn Book is the way it manages its relation to its powerful thousand volumed older sister The Feminist Anti Porn Book As is recounted by several contributors, in the 1980 s some feminists advocacy of censoring sexual representations in the name of public morality was so powerful it became associated in the public mind with feminism itself Andrea Dworkin argued with passionate and influential conviction that because pornography dehumanized women it should be criminalized, and the law professor Catherine McKinnon made serious inroads in getting laws passed that would have allowed women to sue venues showing pornography for violating their civil rights The essayist Robin Morgan coined WAP s Women Against Pornography rallying cry Pornography is the theory, rape is the practice These abolitionist fears about the effects of representation were so powerfully set out in the 1980 s that one hears them voiced as instant reactions even today For example in a Good Reads response to this book someone wrote, The fact that people apologizing and working for the filmed rape industry can call themselves feminists just goes to show how meaningless that word has become Confronted by this denunciation of their choices and decisions to participate in the porn industry, or introduce a porn canon and conditions of production and reception study into university curriculums, one might imagine that the women writing in The Feminist Porn Book might be a little irritated by their judgmental older sister But, by and large, they don t come across as counter judgmental Many acknowledge the provoking influence of the Dworkin McKinnon arguments as they sought views that would square their experience of lived sexuality and encounters with porn Perhaps coming to some kind of terms with one s inner puritan is a crucial part of any ethical development But now, immersed in their own projects of creating an inclusive, ethical and consent based pornography that is still hot and profitable, they are at peace with what they have to offer Many are willing to be in dialogue with the sister who sees them as wretchedly misguided, but they do not seek her permission They know what they are about and what they re trying to do They have porn to make, and a world to change My favorite essay was Imag in ing Possibilities The Psychotherapeutic Potential of Queer Pornography It was written by the psychotherapist Keiko Lane, and like so many of these essays what made it good was her complication of a received interpretation In this case it s the one that says that an attraction to violent sex can only indicate the presence of a trauma history which must not be acted out The idea is that one seeks out degrading actual encounters this is used to explain sex workers to themselves or virtual ones through a taste for rough sex pornography in order to relive or reverse childhood abuse Now that this can happen is an agreed upon thing, a premise that any competent therapist will have in mind But that account of someone s motivation is a small swath on a large spectrum, and there s a tendency on the part of insight therapists to imagine it as the answer the one about which the client must be convinced for the sake of her own self knowledge.So the story that Dr Lane tells is of being an out queer therapist doing her internship and being assigned a butch identified dyke in her late twenties This client had in fact been sexually abused as a child, and had fantasies of being in charge which she borrowed from pornography made by and for straight men Dr Lane had some kind of discussion, largely undisclosed, with her client about her desire and its possible meanings and implications Apparently the discussions did not focus on the danger of her desires but left open the possibility that under the right circumstances they could be the source of mutual consensual pleasure and fulfillment After the session ended, I turned off the tape recorder I had a brief fantasy of erasing the tape, because I didn t sound like any of the neutral toned psychoanalytic therapists in the case studies my supervisor had been giving me to read My fantasies of erasing the tape, or even just misplacing it, were quickly supplanted by a sinking feeling of dread over sharing it with my supervisor It turns out that Dr Lane s forebodings were well founded Her supervisor did not want her to discuss with her client the possibility of healing enactments I argued with my supervisor about this for weeks She was interested in my idea about symbolized enactments, but still felt that my client was setting herself up to traumatize herself or someone else Eventually she told me that I had to confront my client, to caution her against enacting her fantasies and urge her to explore them only verbally The young therapist did as she was told, and felt crappy about it as if she d betrayed her client s courage in bringing forward her desire The essay then pivots to describe a class called Queer Bodies in Psychotherapy which Dr Lane teaches to graduate students in a clinical psychology program It s a class in which pornography is part of the curriculum for reasons she explains, and the issue of enactment presumably gets a fuller andnuanced hearing than was available even just ten years ago The most important thing about The Feminist Porn Book is that it documents and forwards an ongoing conversation As I was writing this review Twitter told me that the second annual Feminist Porn Conference would be held on April third and fourth of 2014 at the University of Toronto s Mark S Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies If the topic intrigues you, but after sampling this book you don t share my enthusiasm for it, stay tuned there sto come Here s a list of presentation titles for the 2014 Feminist Porn Conference referred to above.Feminist Porn 101 What It Is, What It Isn t, and Why It MattersConsent Authenticity Interrogating Two Feminist Porn TenetsFeminist Porn Battlegrounds Religion, The Law and TumblrTheory Practice Masochistic Femininity and Feminist Kink PornOur Great Grand Queers Porn Before WWIITurned On New Technologies, Sexual Interface Feminist Erotic MediaBusiness Track If You Build It, They Will.com Feminist Porn Website Development TroubleshootingRace and Sexual Labor on Screen Perspectives from a Performer, a Viewer, and an AcademicResearch It, Archive It, Teach It, Do It Sex Work in the AcademyLove the Whore You re With Self Care Allyship for Sex WorkersTurned On New Technologies, Sexual Interface Feminist Erotic Media Contrapuntal ReadingGlosswitch writes, The underlying thought behind sex positive feminism is conservative and unimaginative, fearing a sexless void should patriarchy ever vacate the space it currently fills I find this a puzzling formulation, but here is a link to the essay Sex Positive Feminism doing patriarchy s work for it Conference TweetsSo the Conference is over, but Claire Litton helpfully created a storify tweet archive Unfortunately I can t post a direct link because you have to have a Storify account to see it but it s free to set one up, and only takes seconds Then you can search Storify for Feminist Porn Conference 2014 Day 2 Or search Twitter for the Conference hashtag fpcon2


  6. Anna Anna says:

    An insightful and fascinating collection of essays from many different perspectives and backgrounds Proof that pornography needsacademic study that it belongs in any media and sexuality curriculum that it plays many roles in our culture Some of the essays get bogged down in overly academic terminology, to the point of being difficult to read, but all are worthy reads that challenge assumptions and the tropes of mainstream pornography.


  7. Sarah Szymanski Sarah Szymanski says:

    I d like to start off by saying that I went into this book as a biased, anti porn feminist I do already hold strong beliefs on the topic of porn and I wasn t really expecting them to change from reading this book, though I was curious to see if they would shift at all.On the back cover, reviewer and feminist pornographer Annie Sprinkle promised to eat her bra if this book didn t sway anti porn feminists to the pro porn side I hope you have that bra handy, Ms Sprinkle, because I didn t find th I d like to start off by saying that I went into this book as a biased, anti porn feminist I do already hold strong beliefs on the topic of porn and I wasn t really expecting them to change from reading this book, though I was curious to see if they would shift at all.On the back cover, reviewer and feminist pornographer Annie Sprinkle promised to eat her bra if this book didn t sway anti porn feminists to the pro porn side I hope you have that bra handy, Ms Sprinkle, because I didn t find that book to do that at all This book seemed largely self serving, made for feminists or individuals who are already on the pro porn side, or at the very least, not against porn.I was disappointed by Betty Dodson s comparison of emotional sexual assault victims to fascists and lynch mobs, simply because their dislike of porn came from an emotional, personal and traumatic place, which is apparently irrational Clarissa Smith and Feona Attwood s article was basically a review of Gail DinesPornlandwhere they took some of theemotional parts from the book, acting as if her opinion on porn wasn t at all based on fact, conveniently leaving out any of the facts in her book, while also hardly providing any pro porn facts of their own Jane Ward claims we can take queer meaning from sexist and homophobic porn, despite the fact that this type of porn is largely highly detrimental to how society views women and queer people Danny Wylde acknowledges that we don t truly know whether a porn scene is consensual or not, yet does not criticize that fact These are some of the things I was most disappointed with in this book, and I found very little value in anything else.There were two things I did appreciate the mention of, however 1 Some of the contributors spoke to the importance of female sexuality being acknowledged and not portrayed in a negative light Women s sexuality has been repressed in many parts of the world for much of history and it is important that women are not shamed for their sexuality I am not anti sex, though I am critical of it, believing that just because sex is not inherently bad, does not mean that all kinds of sex are good.2 There was some writing about the concerns of anti porn feminists banding together with conservatives to criticize porn, and the worry that if pornography was banned, sexual health information, abortion information access and LGBT resources might be too I understand these concerns and do not see a benefit in working with conservative groups who, just like many working in the porn industry, hold negative views of women and our sexuality and wish to largely repress it.These are things I ll be aware of as I continue to educate and talk about why I m anti pornography.I do understand how this new brand of feminist porn can empower individual women, however, as long as the mainstream industry exists which exploits and degrades women, as well as doesn t care for their consent, I will be opposed to pornography


  8. Jessica Silk Jessica Silk says:

    I was really excited to get my hands on this book because it s such an important and fun topic However, since it s a collection of essays, my engagement with the pieces varied tremendously and left me wanting What I didn t like Even though I benefit from educational privilege, have taken feminist theory courses, and have read all kinds of high brow theory, most of theacademic pieces were very difficult to read either due to overly academic language or because the arguments wer I was really excited to get my hands on this book because it s such an important and fun topic However, since it s a collection of essays, my engagement with the pieces varied tremendously and left me wanting What I didn t like Even though I benefit from educational privilege, have taken feminist theory courses, and have read all kinds of high brow theory, most of theacademic pieces were very difficult to read either due to overly academic language or because the arguments were often unclear bad lazy or referenced too many other writers works without providing summaries of said works I think smart folks can and should write in clear ways that make their points in aaccessible fashion.What I did like The pieces that werepersonal for instance, most of the pieces where sex workers wrote from their OWN experiences, desires, beliefs were so muchinteresting, accessible, and thought provoking than theacademic writings Fortunately, there were many of these and they covered a wide range of topics, including providing a historical context and looking at the intersections of gender identity, sexual identity, race ethnicity, ability, etc I understand the need to have multiple standpoints and types of writing in one collection, but for me thepersonal first hand pieces were so much better that they just made a lot of the theoretical cultural criticism pieces seem really vague and lacking in their arguments For example, it was hard to read Celine Parrenas Shimizu s analysis of Keni Style s behaviors in Tristan Taormino s Rough Sex 3 because it s all speculation which is especially limited after reading other folks speaking from their own experience Maybe what bothers me is that when it comes to something as personal as sexuality, every nuance is really important and it s hard to analyze other people s intentions or experiences or desires unless we explicitly ask them, right So how do we go about analyzing other people s behaviors or intentions and apply them to our own theories arguments unless we ask them And what does it mean to use someone else s behaviors choices for our own arguments This is a huge limitation for me I wish I hadexamples, but since it was hard for me to stay engaged while reading this book, it took me a few months to get to all the pieces


  9. Silence Welder Silence Welder says:

    This book was amazing It was great to hear so many stories in the words of varied porn performers and educators It s a proper academic text with references and studies, but also personal accounts and opinions Altogether enlightening, informative and encouraging It made me want to read the work of anti porn activists too, to hear their side of the argument s and to make my own decisions An important and worthwhile book in my opinion.


  10. Alyssa Alyssa says:

    This collection of essays is written by an interesting mix of scholars, performers, and directors with some who are all 3 It gives an in depth, diverse view of an industry that is so often depicted as a big bad , but is in fact as nuanced as any other.


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