[Download] ✤ Living Into Community: Cultivating Practices That Sustain Us ➸ Christine D. Pohl – Thomashillier.co.uk


10 thoughts on “Living Into Community: Cultivating Practices That Sustain Us

  1. says:

    This book will focus on several practices that are basic to human life IN families, communities, and congregations that are vibrant and sturdy, we notice certain patterns in relationships We see folks making and keeping promise, living and speaking truthfully, expressing gratitude, and offering hospitality 5 Each of the practices we will be exploring is important to the biblical story and to expectations about the ways in which the people of God should live Each is also at the heart of G This book will focus on several practices that are basic to human life IN families, communities, and congregations that are vibrant and sturdy, we notice certain patterns in relationships We see folks making and keeping promise, living and speaking truthfully, expressing gratitude, and offering hospitality 5 Each of the practices we will be exploring is important to the biblical story and to expectations about the ways in which the people of God should live Each is also at the heart of God s character and activity we worship a God who is faithful and true, gracious and welcoming 6 We begin with the practices of gratitude because the Christian life is most of all a response to the grace we have received Christian community begins in gratitude, is sustained by our promise and truthfulness, and is expressed in hospitality But things ware never really that linear or sequential The grace to which we respond is expressed in God s welcome to us That elicits and strengthens our practice of hospitality Our promises are rooted in God s fidelity to us, and our truthfulness finds its home in the grace and truth of Christ 13


  2. says:

    This book is not well written but I forced myself to get through it because there seemed to be some interesting concepts about what s needed in healthy communities However, overall, the book feels very disorganized and negative, and in the end, when I went back through the highlighted points, I realized that the best concepts or quotes were actually not even from this author For example, the author quotes Hannah Arendt when talking about promises, and this is a great point concept that when This book is not well written but I forced myself to get through it because there seemed to be some interesting concepts about what s needed in healthy communities However, overall, the book feels very disorganized and negative, and in the end, when I went back through the highlighted points, I realized that the best concepts or quotes were actually not even from this author For example, the author quotes Hannah Arendt when talking about promises, and this is a great point concept that when we make and keep promises, we create islands of predictability amid the unpredictability of human affairs and the unreliability of human beings


  3. says:

    Not every important reminder need be nested in witticism or profundity While not particularly eloquent, the simplicity of this book s message still rings with truth


  4. says:

    I enjoyed this book and the four community practices that the author understands as integral for healthy biblical community gratitude, promise keeping, truthfulness, and hospitality.


  5. says:

    Community is marked and grown through the practice of gratitude, truthfulness, promise making and keeping, and hospitality Anecdotal and practical The author gave me plenty to work on as I recommit to participating in church rather than just running a church.


  6. says:

    As I was reading the introduction I found myself wondering at points whether Pohl had been given a report about the very congregations I have served in The fact that her description of what unhealthy communities look like could so easily have been a description of communities I have spent time in speaks to the common difficulty of truly living in community with one another.Community, as Pohl defines it, isthan just the accumulation of persons with which we interact It isthan just a As I was reading the introduction I found myself wondering at points whether Pohl had been given a report about the very congregations I have served in The fact that her description of what unhealthy communities look like could so easily have been a description of communities I have spent time in speaks to the common difficulty of truly living in community with one another.Community, as Pohl defines it, isthan just the accumulation of persons with which we interact It isthan just a neighborhood, office, or church Community is only community when there is an intentionality to live our lives in an intimate and edifying connection with one another.If I had been asked to elevate three qualities that lead to healthy community, I am quite sure I would not have come up with the same ones that Pohl did But after reading the book and considering how gratitude, promise keeping and truth telling can so quickly build community when attended to, and evenquickly destroy when neglected, I believe she is on to something.There is much here that will be helpful to those seeking community, especially to leaders who are charged with its active cultivation Probably would have been better to reconcile the 2nd and 3rd chapters of each section because there was so much over lap, and I think the tie in to hospitality at the end was a bit of a stretch, but I appreciated the insights on the whole and found the mix of theory, observation, and story to make this an enjoyable read


  7. says:

    I feel split on this one There is plenty of good thinking and research here, and it s presented in a very clear, consistent structure It s very choppy, though In an effort to cover broad concepts quickly, Pohl has written somethinglike a handbook to community or, rather, a handbook to gratitude, promises, and truth, with a side of hospitality I feel like my relatively plentiful highlights will be useful, but it never felt like that deep a read.


  8. says:

    Thoughtful practices for not a perfect community but a graceful and truthful onePohl s book outlines four practices for building a community of Christ 1 Gratitude 2 Promise making3 Truth telling4 HospitalityThese aren t things I ve seen in other discussions of building community They aren t guaranteed to grow anyone s church But they speak to the character of the type and quality of our community regardless of size.


  9. says:

    I wanted this to be awesome but it was just okay Good points, but the four topics discussed were frequently dealt with as their own freestanding topic devoid of any substantial unique connection to community So yes, communities should have these marks gratitude, promise keeping, truth telling, and hospitality, but I gotout of discussing these topics with others than just sticking to the writing.


  10. says:

    It is practical and realistic with some interesting ideas However, I sense the author was trying to cover too many things in a small volume, which made some concepts not well explained and discussed When I am reading it, I feel like it jumps around too much without diving deep in any specific area I think Part I Gratitude is most well written Part II III, which for me are supposed to be the most interesting parts of the book, are not that well crafted It is practical and realistic with some interesting ideas However, I sense the author was trying to cover too many things in a small volume, which made some concepts not well explained and discussed When I am reading it, I feel like it jumps around too much without diving deep in any specific area I think Part I Gratitude is most well written Part II III, which for me are supposed to be the most interesting parts of the book, are not that well crafted


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Living Into Community: Cultivating Practices That Sustain Us Every Christian Should Read This Provocative Book Christine Thoroughly Delineates The Interlocking Relationships And Dangerous Deformities Of Practices That Could Deepen Our Communities But Often Destroy Them This Volume Is Pertinent To Our Families, Churches, Even Places Of Work Marva J Dawnauthor Of Truly The Community

  • Paperback
  • 224 pages
  • Living Into Community: Cultivating Practices That Sustain Us
  • Christine D. Pohl
  • English
  • 10 December 2019
  • 0802849857

About the Author: Christine D. Pohl

Christine D Pohl is Associate Provost and Professor of Church and Society Christian Ethics at Asbury Theological Seminary, Wil, Kentucky, where she has taught since 1989 She received a B.S in Special Education at Syracuse University, 1972 a M.A in Theological Studies, Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, 1986 and a Ph.D in Ethics and Society at Emory University, 1993 She is best known as the author of Making Room Recovering Hospitality as a Christian Tradition.